[Humanist] 27.756 events: HTML5/XML; large collections

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Fri Jan 31 07:37:48 CET 2014


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 27, No. 756.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Tommie Usdin <btusdin at mulberrytech.com>                   (32)
        Subject: HTML5 and XML: a symposium

  [2]   From:    Centre for e-Research <cerch at kcl.ac.uk>                   (53)
        Subject: Centre for e-Research talk: Pieter Francois, 6.15pm Tues 4
                Feb, KCL, London


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Thu, 30 Jan 2014 13:00:53 -0500
        From: Tommie Usdin <btusdin at mulberrytech.com>
        Subject: HTML5 and XML: a symposium

CALL FOR PARTICIPATION

HTML5 and XML: Mending Fences 
a Balisage pre-conference symposium

a one-day symposium preceding Balisage: The Markup Conference
Robin Berjon, chair

Despite a decade of efforts dedicated to making XML the markup language of the Web, today it is HTML5 that has taken on that role. While HTML5 can in part be made to work with an XML syntax, reliance on that feature is rare compared to use of HTML5's own syntax.

Over the years, the competition between these two approaches has led to animosity and frustration. But both XML and HTML5 are now clearly here to stay, and with the upcoming standardisation of HTML5 in 2014 it is now time to take stock and see how both technologies — and both communities — can coöperate constructively.

There are many environments in which these two markup languages are brought to interact. Additionally, there is much that they can learn from one another. We are looking forward to sharing experiences and ideas that bring the two together.

Topics include:

We welcome proposals to present at the Symposium. Topics may include, but are not limited to:

- Experiences (at any level of success) working with both HTML and XML
- Applying XML tools to HTML5 and vice-versa
- How Web technology built on XML can be brought to the HTML5 world
- Capturing data and metadata in HTML, or in general extending or refining HTML for specific applications
- Approaches to working with non-XML languages with an XML tool-set, including notably JSON as it is commonly used in conjunction with HTML

Details: 
http://www.balisage.net/HTML5-XML/
information about Balisage: The Markup Conference: http://www.balisage.net/

Schedule:
18 April 2014  - Submissions due
20 May 2014    - Speakers notified
11 July 2014   - Final papers due 	
  4 August 2014 - Symposium on HTML5 and XML
5-8 August 2014 - Balisage: The Markup Conference

Questions: <info at balisage.net> 

if you don't get a response within 3 business days please re-send 
your message or call +1 301 315 9631 

======================================================================
Balisage: The Markup Conference 2014          mailto:info at balisage.net
August 5-8, 2014                               http://www.balisage.net
Preconference Symposium: August 4, 2014                +1 301 315 9631
======================================================================



--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Thu, 30 Jan 2014 18:05:50 +0000
        From: Centre for e-Research <cerch at kcl.ac.uk>
        Subject: Centre for e-Research talk: Pieter Francois, 6.15pm Tues 4 Feb, KCL, London


Pieter Francois (Oxford), "Exploring very large collections 
of texts by creating structured unbiased samples."

Centre for e-Research, King's College London
4 February, 6.15pm
-----

Next week, on Tuesday 4th February at 6.15pm, Pieter Francois (Oxford) 
will be giving a talk in the Centre for e-Research seminar series at 
King's College London. The talk is on: "Exploring very large collections 
of texts by creating structured unbiased samples." More details are at 
the bottom of this email.

The event is free of charge but please would you register beforehand, 
at: 
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/cerch-seminar-exploring-very-large-collections-of-texts-by-creating-structured-unbiased-samples-tickets-10115191811

Our seminars are held fortnightly on Tuesdays during term time at 6.15pm 
in the Anatomy Museum, on the 6th floor of King's Building, Strand 
Campus, King's College London: 
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/innovation/groups/cerch/research/projects/completed/atm.aspx 
. Seminars are followed by drinks and nibbles.

The full programme for this term can be found at 
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/innovation/groups/cerch/research/seminars/2013-14.aspx. 

We hope you can join us.

Regards,
Anna Jordanous (CeRch)

---
*Exploring very large collections of texts by creating structured 
unbiased samples*
Pieter Francois (Oxford)

Abstract: This presentation introduces the 'Sample Generator', a digital 
tool which allows users to generate structured unbiased samples of 
(digital) texts from the nineteenth century British Library holdings. 
Using the Sample Generator allows researchers to explore quickly a very 
large dataset (the British Library has approximately 1.8 million 
nineteenth century holdings) in a methodologically robust way. 
Furthermore the generated samples are easily citable and shareable. The 
overall intellectual background of the Sample Generator is that of the 
'generative humanities' in which a creative process of going back and 
forth between data and the conceptual drawing board takes centre stage. 
In addition to saving valuable research time, the main contribution of 
the Sample Generator is that it is a hypothesis generating and testing 
tool. This presentation will address the ideas behind the Sample 
Generator, offer a hands on showcasing of its main functionalities and 
will finally demonstrate the value and potential of the Sample Generator 
by zooming in briefly on one case study, i.e. an analysis of the changes 
in nineteenth century travel routes in Europe.

More details at 
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/innovation/groups/cerch/research/seminars/2013-14/s8exploring.aspx

-- 
Anna Jordanous
Centre for e-Research (CeRch)
Department of Digital Humanities
King's College London
26-29 Drury Lane, London WC2B 5RL
www: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/innovation/groups/cerch/





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