[Humanist] 27.714 3D scanners

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Sat Jan 18 11:20:41 CET 2014


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 27, No. 714.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    "Prescott, Andrew" <andrew.prescott at kcl.ac.uk>            (52)
        Subject: Re:  27.710 3D scanners?

  [2]   From:    Hannah Scates Kettler <hannah.scates at gmail.com>           (90)
        Subject: Re:  27.710 3D scanners?


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Fri, 17 Jan 2014 11:05:01 +0000
        From: "Prescott, Andrew" <andrew.prescott at kcl.ac.uk>
        Subject: Re:  27.710 3D scanners?
        In-Reply-To: <20140117105522.8CC326276 at digitalhumanities.org>


Dear Øyvind,

The University of Kent Archaeology laboratory has recently acquired a 3D laser scanner and is making very effective use of it:

http://www.kent.ac.uk/news/stories/IronAgeHelmet/2012 

The technician who manages the scanner is Lloyd Bosworth: his e-mail is l.bosworth at kent.ac.uk

Andrew

Professor Andrew Prescott FRHistS 
Head of Department 
Department of Digital Humanities 
King's College London 
26-29 Drury Lane 
London WC2B 5RL 
@ajprescott 
www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/ddh 
digitalriffs.blogspot.com 
+44 (0)20 7848 2651 

On 17 Jan 2014, at 10:55, Humanist Discussion Group <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk> wrote:

>                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 27, No. 710.
>            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
>                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
>                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
> 
> 
> 
>        Date: Thu, 16 Jan 2014 08:49:21 +0100
>        From: Øyvind Eide  <oyvind.eide at uni-passau.de>
>        Subject: 3D scanners
> 
> 
> Dear colleagues,
> 
> We are considering buying at least one 3D scanner for small objects, to be used in teaching and for small digitisation projects. It would be good to find something relatively cheap and user friendly. 
> 
> Are there any guides or surveys of such equipment focusing on usability in a cultural heritage/digital humanities context? I would also be happy to hear about any practical experience you may have in this area. 
> 
> With kind regards,
> 
> Øyvind Eide
> 
> -- 
> Dr. Øyvind Eide
> Wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter
> Lehrstuhl für Digital Humanities
> URL: http://www.phil.uni-passau.de/rehbein.html
> 
> Universität Passau
> Innstr. 40 (Nikolakloster)
> 94032 Passau
> Büro: NK 429
> 
> fon: +49.851.509.3454 (Sekretariat .3451)
> fax: +49.851.509.3452




--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Fri, 17 Jan 2014 10:11:03 -0600
        From: Hannah Scates Kettler <hannah.scates at gmail.com>
        Subject: Re:  27.710 3D scanners?
        In-Reply-To: <20140117105522.8CC326276 at digitalhumanities.org>


Hello Øyvind,

It really depends on how much detail you are wanting to capture, and what
kinds of objects you want to scan. I have personally used the NextEngine 3D
scanner (laser - about £1855) to scan archaeological artifacts and the
PAMCO/3D SOM Pro set up (digital photography - £849 for imaging software)
to "scan" a modern art collection.

Laser scanning, as you might imagine, captures a much higher level of
surface detail -and therefore produces larger files. It is perfect for
scanning archaeological artifacts when detail is necessary for analysis.The
NextEngine system is really user friendly. It does not take long to learn,
especially if one reads the short manual. It produces nice 3D meshes, but
color-capture is not the best quality. There are ways round that in a 3rd
party software such as Photoshop, which handles 3D in the later versions,
or other 3D software like Blender (freeware), but require a higher level of
skill.

Using digital photography is usually enough to capture an object, but it
creates a relatively flat 3D model and does sometimes require quite a bit
of post processing to get a decent 3D mesh. For the purposes of the art
collection, object were usually boxes or objects that did not have a lot of
surface detail. What was necessary was higher texture or material detail
that the photography was able to reproduce. Digital photography systems are
also the cheaper option and can be done with the right software and a
camera phone. 3D SOM Pro is becoming much more useable, and seems to be
focusing efforts to develop ways to edit the 3D model natively, which was a
major upgrade from version 2 of the software. Some texture touch-up is
usually necessary in a 3rd party software. 3D SOM Pro is user friendly but
the process takes longer than laser scanning in my experience. I do not
recommend the PAMCO turntable. It is dense, not very intuitive and crashes.
A lot.

There are a lot more specifics I could go into about the process pros and
cons, but that is my general impression regarding these two 3D scanning
systems. I do not know of any surveys on 3D scanning, but there are many
guides out there. The guides are specific to particular 3D scanning systems
because the strengths and weaknesses of each 3D scanner really depends on
the object, capture method and the software combination. Though there are
overarching issues like the degraded texture quality of lower priced laser
scanners, and the problems capturing concave objects with photogrammetry,
they are usually discussed in relation to a specific 3D scanner. I wish I
could be more help here. I'm sure someone else will know more than I on the
subject.

I would also like to piggy-back off Øyvind's call and ask if there are any
standard file types for maintaining/preserving the 3D files other than the
ISO COLLADA file type which no one seems to be using. And whether there has
been talk about a 3D preservation method that also packages a rendering
capability.

I look forward to further discussion!

Best wishes,
Hannah Scates Kettler



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