[Humanist] 27.680 girls & computing; lower-cost technology

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Tue Jan 7 08:53:52 CET 2014


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 27, No. 680.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Adrian Miles <adrian.miles at rmit.edu.au>                    (8)
        Subject: Re:  27.676 lower-cost technology

  [2]   From:    Daniel Allington <daniel.allington at open.ac.uk>            (23)
        Subject: Re:  27.678 girls and computing


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 6 Jan 2014 17:21:59 +1100
        From: Adrian Miles <adrian.miles at rmit.edu.au>
        Subject: Re:  27.676 lower-cost technology
        In-Reply-To: <20140106061223.073466178 at digitalhumanities.org>


hi all  

might also be worth noting that Kano uses Rasperry Pi and while not available it’s kickstarter campaign (aiming for $100k) raised 1.5 million including 10,000 people purchasing the product. Certainly would indicate some interest.  

[insert appropriate closing]  
Adrian Miles
vogmae.net.au
https://www.vizify.com/adrian-miles
+61 (03) 9925 3157  

Sent with Mail Pilot


--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 6 Jan 2014 10:41:57 +0000
        From: Daniel Allington <daniel.allington at open.ac.uk>
        Subject: Re:  27.678 girls and computing
        In-Reply-To: <20140106061801.B825161AC at digitalhumanities.org>

On 6 Jan 2014, at 06:18, Humanist Discussion Group wrote:

>
> --[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
>        Date: Sun, 05 Jan 2014 15:39:44 +0000
>        From: Michael Fraser <mike.fraser at it.ox.ac.uk>
>        Subject: Re:  27.672 girls and computing
>        In-Reply-To: <20140105094947.730665F8A at digitalhumanities.org>
>
> Whilst I do not claim any academic expertise in biological determinism,
> nature vs nurture, or the formation of gender identity, whether in
> connection with girls and computing or later career choices, I would
> like to make mention of the movement against the gender stereotyping of
> toys.

That's a very interesting point. On a pre-Christmas visit to a large toyshop in the UK, I was struck by how heavily some manufacturers have invested in producing 'boy' and 'girl' versions of what are essentially the same toys, such as Nerf blasters and LEGO bricks. In many cases, it appears that the 'girl' versions are in some way the odd ones out. For example, the Nerf blasters with photographs of boys on the boxes are simply branded 'Nerf', whereas the Nerf blasters with photographs of girls on the boxes are branded 'Nerf Rebelle', with what I felt to be some incredibly clumsy gender stereotyping: the Heartbreaker Bow and the Pink Crush Crossbow in particular. Perhaps I shouldn't mention the availability of child-sized, princess-pink hunting rifles in the US. Is it only a matter of time before someone releases a pink-themed 'Linux Princess' distro in a misguided attempt to prepare girls for careers in systems administration?

Best wishes

Daniel

PS. I hope somebody's going to bring Sherry Turkle's work into this discussion before long.

Dr Daniel Allington
Lecturer in English Language Studies
Centre for Language and Communication
The Open University

www.danielallington.net

-- The Open University is incorporated by Royal Charter (RC 000391), an exempt charity in England & Wales and a charity registered in Scotland (SC 038302).





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