[Humanist] 27.678 girls and computing

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Mon Jan 6 07:18:01 CET 2014


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 27, No. 678.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    "Dave Postles" <davep at davelinux.info>                      (1)
        Subject: Re:  27.672 girls and computing

  [2]   From:    Michael Fraser <mike.fraser at it.ox.ac.uk>                  (29)
        Subject: Re:  27.672 girls and computing


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Sun, 5 Jan 2014 14:23:35 -0000
        From: "Dave Postles" <davep at davelinux.info>
        Subject: Re:  27.672 girls and computing
        In-Reply-To: <20140105094947.730665F8A at digitalhumanities.org>

http://www.womenwhotech.com/opensource.html



--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Sun, 05 Jan 2014 15:39:44 +0000
        From: Michael Fraser <mike.fraser at it.ox.ac.uk>
        Subject: Re:  27.672 girls and computing
        In-Reply-To: <20140105094947.730665F8A at digitalhumanities.org>


On 05/01/14 09:49, Humanist Discussion Group wrote:

[...]

> 
> It seems there are a few factors at play, roughly around 3 connected
> areas: 1. Girls' interests 2. Cultural issues around gender and geek
> cultures 3. The way computers are presented and taught.

Whilst I do not claim any academic expertise in biological determinism,
nature vs nurture, or the formation of gender identity, whether in
connection with girls and computing or later career choices, I would
like to make mention of the movement against the gender stereotyping of
toys. In particular, readers may be interested in the Let Toys Be Toys
campaign that is lobbying retailers "to stop limiting childrenÂ’s
interests by promoting some toys as only suitable for girls, and others
only for boys",  http://www.lettoysbetoys.org.uk/why-it-matters/  (and
for examples, see
 http://www.lettoysbetoys.org.uk/the-let-toys-be-toys-2013-silliness-awards/ ).

Given that there remain retailers (and some manufacturers) who have
ideas from a previous age about what toys or books boys and girls
_should_ be interested in, this 'social construction' of playtime may
persist in discouraging exploration of various aspects of computing from
an early age.

(I also came across this article, Martincic, C. J., Bhatnagar, N. "Will
Computer Engineer Barbie impact young women's career choices?"
Information Systems Education Journal, 10:6 (2012): 4-14.
 http://isedj.org/2012-10/N6/ISEDJv10n6p4.html )

Mike

-- 
Dr Michael Fraser | Director of Infrastructure Services | IT Services |
University of Oxford | 7-19 Banbury Road, Oxford | http://www.it.ox.ac.uk/





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