[Humanist] 27.787 characters not in UniCode

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Wed Feb 12 07:42:55 CET 2014


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 27, No. 787.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org



        Date: Tue, 11 Feb 2014 20:33:00 +1000
        From: Desmond Schmidt <desmond.allan.schmidt at gmail.com>
        Subject: Re:  27.784 characters not in UniCode
        In-Reply-To: <20140211062304.2D7D5636A at digitalhumanities.org>


Maurizio,

Perhaps you don't need a character for sescuncia. There was already a
Unicode proposal in 2006 for Roman weights and measures:
http://www.unicode.org/L2/L2006/06173-roman-coinage.pdf
This says that sescuncia can be easily composed from semuncia and hyphen.
Sumuncia already exists - it has code 10192. So I guess the idea is that
you code it as two characters and then overprint them using a format, or
edit a font and get it that way.
There's also a procedure for introducing new characters into Unicode, but
they won't accept ligatures, since this is a font issue.(That's what they
say, not me).
http://www.unicode.org/pending/proposals.html

hope this helps
Desmond

On Tue, Feb 11, 2014 at 4:23 PM, Humanist Discussion Group <
willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk> wrote:

>                  Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 27, No. 784.
>             Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
>                        www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
>                 Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
>
>
>
>         Date: Mon, 10 Feb 2014 10:34:46 +0100
>         From: maurizio lana <maurizio.lana at gmail.com>
>         Subject: Re: [Humanist] 27.780 characters not in UniCode
>         In-Reply-To: <20140210060026.3708562FD at digitalhumanities.org>
>
>
> Il 10/02/14 07:00, Humanist Discussion Group ha scritto:
> > Hi Maurizio,
> > thank you very much for this information. It is most helpful, and thank
> you
> > also to James, Alan and Laura for their references. I have now a wealth
> of
> > information to fight back against the criticism of an argument, which I
> > will explain briefly since Maurizio asks.
> thank you very much desmond for this insight into you critical thoughts.
>
> my question was an interested one because as a side effect of your
> request i was brought to think more throughly to the problem caused by
> missing Unicode characters.
>
> recalling what i wrote, one could use the currency pound Unicode
> character to represent the symbol for sescuncia because they share the
> same glyph. this can happen because we are 'people of print' but if we
> read the text at digital level (character encoding) no late latin text
> can contain a 'currency pound' symbol. similarly for thousand of other
> cases (for example when one unlocks ligatures). or, from another point
> of view: we cannot but do this real mistake at digital level because
> doing it we at least have something working smoothly at visual/print level.
>
> what i mean is: how one (person or group) could start an initiative for
> bringing into Unicode those missing characters? with 1)no worry for the
> glyphs, which can arrive later (the true problem is that of having the
> character codes); and 2) no worry for building a complete list because
> this could stop the initiative before it starts.
>
> best
> maurizio
>
>
>
> --
> erano anni felici, anche se noi non ce n'eravamo accorti
> (Anni felici, Daniele Luchetti)
> -------
> il corso di informatica umanistica:
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=85JsyJw2zuw
> la biblioteca digitale del latino tardo: http://www.digiliblt.unipmn.it/
> a day in the life of DH2013: http://dayofdh2013.matrix.msu.edu/digiliblt/
> che cosa sono le digital humanities:
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4JqLst_VKCA
> -------
> Maurizio Lana - ricercatore
> Università  del Piemonte Orientale, Dipartimento di Studi Umanistici
> via Manzoni 8, 13100 Vercelli - tel. +39 347 7370925






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