[Humanist] 27.758 events: Drucker at QMUL; Rare Book School at Penn

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Sat Feb 1 12:51:19 CET 2014


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 27, No. 758.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Chris Sparks <c.sparks at qmul.ac.uk>                        (20)
        Subject: Digital Humanities Lecture at QMUL: Johanna Drucker, March
                25th 2014

  [2]   From:    Dot Porter <dot.porter at gmail.com>                         (70)
        Subject: Rare Book School: The Medieval Mauscript in the 21st Century


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2014 17:32:59 +0000
        From: Chris Sparks <c.sparks at qmul.ac.uk>
        Subject: Digital Humanities Lecture at QMUL: Johanna Drucker, March 25th 2014

*** Attachments:
    http://www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist/Attachments/1391243821_2014-02-01_c.sparks@qmul.ac.uk_9387.2.pdf


Dear all,

You are warmly invited to a public lecture at QMUL entitled Visualizing Temporality: Modelling Time from the Textual Record, given by Professor Johanna Drucker (UCLA).  The lecture will be at 6:30pm on Tuesday March 25th, in the ArtsTwo lecture theatre at QMUL's Mile End Campus and will be followed by a drinks reception.  An e-invite is attached and further details are below.

The event is free to attend, but you must book online via EventBrite here: http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/digital-humanities-with-professor-johanna-drucker-tickets-10114064439

Please forward the invitation to any interested parties you may know.

VISUALIZING TEMPORALITY: MODELLING TIME FROM THE TEXTUAL RECORD
Professor Johanna Drucker, UCLA

What does time look like? We are all familiar with the standard timeline that measures out events with neat tick-marks, like the divisions on a ruler. Yet whilst very few of us really think about the past in this sort of methodical way, the tools we use in the digital realm impose an artificial sense of order and regularity to the unfolding of events. Taking an eighteenth-century reference work, Edmund Fry's Pantographia, as her case study, Professor Drucker will examine the various overlapping frameworks that authors use when assembling and organizing historical events. Her lecture will argue that the development of digital tools must be guided by humanities scholars if we are to represent the human past faithfully.

Johanna Drucker is the inaugural Breslauer Professor of Bibliographical Studies in the Department of Information Studies at UCLA. She is internationally known for her work in the history of graphic design, typography, experimental poetry, fine art, and digital humanities. In addition, she has a reputation as a book artist, and her limited edition works are in special collections and libraries worldwide. Her most recent titles include SpecLab: Digital Aesthetics and Speculative Computing (Chicago, 2009), and Graphic Design History: A Critical Guide (Pearson, 2008, 2nd edition late 2012). She is currently working on a database memoire, ALL, the online Museum of Writing in collaboration with University College London and King's College London, and a letterpress project titled Stochastic Poetics. A collaboratively written work, Digital_Humanities, with Jeffrey Schnapp, Todd Presner, Peter Lunenfeld, and Anne Burdick is forthcoming from MIT Press.

Best wishes,

Chris

--
Dr Chris Sparks
School of History
Queen Mary, University of London
Mile End Road
London, E1 4NS

020 7882 6019



--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2014 10:45:06 -0500
        From: Dot Porter <dot.porter at gmail.com>
        Subject: Rare Book School: The Medieval Mauscript in the 21st Century


THE MEDIEVAL MANUSCRIPT IN THE
TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY
Rare Book School at the
University of Pennsylvania

I'm co-teaching a course at Rare Book School this summer, June 9-13 (RBS is
located in Charlottesville, VA, but we are teaching at the University of
Pennsylvania in Philadelphia). The course is THE MEDIEVAL MANUSCRIPT IN THE
TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY, and we (Will Noel and myself) are hoping to get a
good mix of students with primary interest in (medieval) manuscripts,
primary interest in developing software for working with (digitized)
manuscripts, and some with both. If this sounds like you please consider
applying, and please share this message with colleagues who may be
interested. You can also contact me off-list if you have any questions.

Link to the course description (Application link in the left-hand menu):
http://www.rarebookschool.org/courses/manuscripts/m95/

And I'm pasting the full description below:

This course is designed to introduce students of both the digital
humanities and manuscript studies to the concepts and realities of working
with medieval manuscripts in the twenty-first century. Through the course,
students and faculty will examine materials from the collections of the
Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books, and Manuscripts, as well
as digitized versions of those materials and others.

Students in the course will consider four issues relating to using medieval
manuscripts in a digital world. The first issue is theoretical, considering
the relationship between medieval manuscripts and their digital
counterparts, and questioning the notion of digital surrogacy. What does
"digital surrogacy" mean and how might it affect our consideration of the
physical objects represented through the surrogate? The second issue is the
practical one of imbuing best practices when creating digital assets out of
medieval manuscripts. If we are to digitize manuscripts, how can we ensure
that those digital versions are the best they can be? And again: what does
that mean? The third issue concerns the present landscape for digital
medieval manuscripts (and medieval studies more generally), including
current publication technologies and the place of Open Data. The fourth
issue is that of building resources with and for digitized medieval
manuscripts. What tools are available to enable us to create something new?
As a final project, students and faculty in the course will work together
to build something new--either "hacking" an application to display and sort
medieval manuscript data, or creating an exhibition using an existing
platform (such as Omeka). The specific direction of the final project will
depend upon the skill sets available in the room.

Students should plan to bring a laptop with them to class.

In their personal statement, applicants should indicate their background,
special interests, and expectations from the course. They should clearly
state their experience working with manuscripts or manuscript-related
courses they have taken, as well as any experience using digital
technologies. Although it is expected that some students will have some
technological experience, it is not a requirement for the course.

-- 
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
Dot Porter (MA, MSLS)
Digital Medievalist, Digital Librarian
Email: dot.porter at gmail.com
Personal blog: dotporterdigital.org
Medieval Electronic Scholarly Alliance: http://www.mesa-medieval.org
MESA blog: http://mesamedieval.wordpress.com/
MESA on Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/MedievalElectronicScholarlyAlliance
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

-- 
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
Dot Porter (MA, MSLS)
Digital Medievalist, Digital Librarian
Email: dot.porter at gmail.com
Personal blog: dotporterdigital.org
Medieval Electronic Scholarly Alliance: http://www.mesa-medieval.org
MESA blog: http://mesamedieval.wordpress.com/
MESA on Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/MedievalElectronicScholarlyAlliance
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*




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