[Humanist] 27.485 the fact of online publication

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Wed Oct 30 07:26:35 CET 2013


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 27, No. 485.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org



        Date: Tue, 29 Oct 2013 12:52:01 -0700
        From: Jascha Kessler <jkessler at ucla.edu>
        Subject: Re:  27.477 the fact of online publication
        In-Reply-To: <20131029061647.A6EC8767F at digitalhumanities.org>


As for the Internet it is rife with baddies.  Here is a letter of mine put out online at site titled www.speakwithoutinterruption.  A sort of Hyde Park, if you will, or the Union Square of the 30s/40s in NYC, a hobby of some retired businessman.  He allowed be a rubric [taken from Emily Dickinson, LETTERS TO THE WORLD, where I post letters NOT published by the media out there.]  I will paste into this post, if you wont mind, WM...?

Letters to the World (Series) by Jascha Kessler
Posted by Jascha Kessler in: Letters  

September 26, 2013

Letters to the Editor

THE LOS ANGELES TIMES

Los Angeles

Dear Letters Editor:

The Times may argue for the right to fair use of copyrighted material, lauding “new forms of creativity made possible by digital technology.” And cover its rear by adding, “…Copyright holders aren’t happy with the law either, which they say offers little protection from piracy” on a huge scale.  (Nor for individual creators.)

I’m one of those holders with no protection.  A librarian at Connecticut College recently informed me that several of my poems from magazines and my own books, were lifted by a fellow named Morgan in England, submitted under his name and published, even entered in contests, at least one of which he won.  Morgan pirated the work of other writers and put them out under his name. Flattery?  Well, yes—and/or no!  One can’t eat flattery. 

Suppose my words are picked up by some rapper who sells a million "songs"? I’m not Universal Music Publishing. I’ve no recourse. The next thing that could happen is, someone like Morgan engaging Tony Soprano’s lawyer on contingency threatens to sue me, the  copyright holder for infringement on my own work!  No kidding.

Sincerely,

Jascha Kessler

Professor Emeritus of Modern English & American Literature, UCLA, Santa Monica, CA

Jascha Kessler
Professor Emeritus of Modern English & American Literature, UCLA
www.jfkessler.com
www.xlibris.com

On Oct 28, 2013, at 11:16 PM, Humanist Discussion Group wrote:

>                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 27, No. 477.
>            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
>                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
>                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
> 
> 
> 
>        Date: Mon, 28 Oct 2013 20:47:32 +0000
>        From: Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
>        Subject: just the stuff
> 
> 
> This evening on the Channel 4 news (John Snow's programme) was a story 
> about the Syrian rebels' competition for attention, and so for funding, 
> played out in YouTube videos. These videos, the commentator pointed out, 
> are heavily influenced by the format and style of video games, which as 
> tend to approximate as closely as possible the scenery and 
> actions of real battles. The videos are professionally done. Very impressive, 
> using many of the latest techniques. In them the fighters are not 
> hamming it up for the camera, they are acting. Their exultant scenes 
> with captured objects on video are, the commentator said, more important 
> than the actual trophies, such as fighter jets the rebels cannot fly. 
> Life imitating art.
> 
> Add to this The Zuckerberg Files (see elsewhere on Humanist). And add 
> to that the astonishing resources for medieval manuscript research 
> coming on line all the time, e.g. entire manuscripts furnished as 
> downloadable pdfs by the Trier Staatsbibliothek free of charge -- 
> mind-blowing to anyone who has had to trek across Europe and to Russia 
> to get a glimpse. And on it goes.
> 
> Before anyone tries to triangulate on my state of mind using this rather 
> odd mixture of examples, let me run ahead with my point: the mere fact 
> of online publication. Has the show been stolen by something that simple?
> 
> Yours,
> WM
> 
> -- .
> Willard McCarty (www.mccarty.org.uk/), Professor, Department of Digital
> Humanities, King's College London, and Research Group in Digital
> Humanities, University of Western Sydney






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