[Humanist] 27.483 models of computation

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Wed Oct 30 07:23:28 CET 2013


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 27, No. 483.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org



        Date: Tue, 29 Oct 2013 12:18:00 +0000
        From: Arianna Ciula <ariannaciula at gmail.com>
        Subject: Re:  27.471 models of computation
        In-Reply-To: <20131026072243.DD6B63A65 at digitalhumanities.org>


Thanks both for these informative replies which I dare to summarise as
following:

- modelling practices span indeed fields of knowledge and art, moving from
visible to invisible abstractions;
- what might be specific to digital humanities research - or more in
general to interdisciplinary endeavours that make use of
computationally-inspired modelling - is the necessity to combine diverse
modelling techniques (formal reading and close reading, for instance).

Arianna Ciula

On Sat, Oct 26, 2013 at 8:22 AM, Humanist Discussion Group <
willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk> wrote:

>                  Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 27, No. 471.
>             Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
>                        www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
>                 Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
>
>
>
>         Date: Fri, 25 Oct 2013 13:57:56 +0200
>         From: Øyvind_Eide <oyvind.eide at iln.uio.no>
>         Subject: Re:  27.467 models of computation; system for online
> encyclopedia
>         In-Reply-To: <20131025081455.93868768F at digitalhumanities.org>
>
>
> Dear Paul, and all,
>
> I believe the idea of producing models of various sorts is a key to this.
> Each particular model will hide and highlight different things, but so will
> each type of model at a different level.
>
> In my own area of textual studies: Various types of text encoding give
> different insights, but another level of understanding can be reached by
> comparing text encoding to other types of modelling, such as mapping. What
> is hidden and what is highlighted by this specific map? How do this compare
> to other maps? To specific examples of TEI encoding, RDF models, or even
> theatre versions (to stretch the idea of a model a bit)?
>
> I believe various exemplars of various types of models combined with what
> is currently called traditional methods (such as close reading) to be a
> useful line of work. It is indeed time consuming, but so is any detailed
> study of a text.
>
> Kind regards,
>
> Øyvind Eide
>
> On 25. okt. 2013, at 10:14, Humanist Discussion Group wrote:
>
> >                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 27, No. 467.
> >            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
> >                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
> >                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
> >
> >  [1]   From:    Paul Fishwick <metaphorz at gmail.com>
>   (28)
> >        Subject: Re:  27.463 models of computation
> >
> >  [2]   From:    "Holly C. Shulman" <hcs8n at virginia.edu>
>   (50)
> >        Subject: Re:  27.464 system for online encyclopedia?
> >
> >
> >
> --[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
> >        Date: Thu, 24 Oct 2013 11:08:21 -0500
> >        From: Paul Fishwick <metaphorz at gmail.com>
> >        Subject: Re:  27.463 models of computation
> >        In-Reply-To: <20131024073057.8C88B2F03 at digitalhumanities.org>
> >
> >
> > Arianna asks:
> >
> >> Can we do in digital humanities what scholars do/have done with other
> >> techniques? Is modelling in computing going to lift our way of seeing
> and
> >> therefore thinking to another level? I think your answer implies that it
> >> does. But what level of analysis can we reach?
> >
> > I am unsure as to what level can be reached, however, I can point you to
> > a small effort we have to produce models of various sorts, starting
> > with a sculpture (called X) by artist Liz Larner. This short news blog
> summarizes
> > the importance of the effort in terms of modelling:
> >
> >
> http://www.utdallas.edu/atec/blog/2013/10/atec-professor-reflects-on-nasher-xchange-installation/
> >
> > This process will take a few months to complete, but the idea is to
> expand
> > the nature of interpretation to result in models, a subset of which will
> be
> > expressed within the medium of typography (e.g., the more traditional
> text-based
> > interpretations of art criticism, or mathematical models using textual
> expressions).






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