[Humanist] 27.453 models of computation

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Tue Oct 22 10:02:36 CEST 2013


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 27, No. 453.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Arianna Ciula <ariannaciula at gmail.com>                    (45)
        Subject: Re:  27.452 events: models of computation

  [2]   From:    Paul Fishwick <metaphorz at gmail.com>                       (63)
        Subject: Re:  27.452 events: models of computation


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 21 Oct 2013 13:29:47 +0100
        From: Arianna Ciula <ariannaciula at gmail.com>
        Subject: Re:  27.452 events: models of computation
        In-Reply-To: <20131021082558.36299767C at digitalhumanities.org>


Possibly not a very productive reply, but I think the lens of computing,
like any other lens, would constrain your vision and therefore make it
possible that you see anything at all, or, as Olsson ("A Critique of
Cartographic Reason") would put it: would allow you to make the invisible,
visible. It's optical projection as David Hockney reveals it
(deconstructing its mechanics) to us in "Secret Knowledge: Rediscovering
the lost techniques of the Old Masters".

So, I guess, the real question is, is what way would the lens of computing
be different from other lenses if at all?

Arianna

On Mon, Oct 21, 2013 at 9:25 AM, Humanist Discussion Group <
willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk> wrote:

>                  Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 27, No. 452.
>             Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
>                        www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
>                 Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
>
>
>
>         Date: Mon, 21 Oct 2013 03:26:28 +0000
>         From: S B Cooper <pmt6sbc at maths.leeds.ac.uk>
>         Subject: TAMC2014 in Chennai, India, April 11-13, 2014
>
>
> [Most items in the following list of topics for Theory and Applications of
> Models of Computation are too highly specialized and technical to be
> within range of a majority of us, I suspect. But I find it worthwhile to
> look
> through lists such as this to note points of contact between current
> theoretical interests in computer science and other fields. I note, for
> example work on automata, biology, gaming, cryptography, economics,
> learning, aesthetics, processes in nature, systems theory. I find the
> turns to biology, aesthetics and nature the most interesting -- because
> they seem at first the most adventurous. In principle computation is
> indefinitely extensible. But, I wonder, what happens to your view of
> the world when you view it through the lens of computing? Does
> it extend, select or distort your vision? --WM]
>
>
> CALL FOR PAPERS:
> 11th Annual Conference on Theory and Applications of Models of Computation
> [TAMC 2014]
> 11- 13 April 2014
> Vivekananda Auditorium, Anna University, Chennai, India
> http://www.annauniv.edu/tamc2014/


--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 21 Oct 2013 10:30:10 -0500
        From: Paul Fishwick <metaphorz at gmail.com>
        Subject: Re:  27.452 events: models of computation
        In-Reply-To: <20131021082558.36299767C at digitalhumanities.org>


Willard:

   Regarding the topic list, perhaps I am on a quest for the impossible,
but some of these topics can be expressed in a way that is not only
palatable to non-CS but is also deeply engaging. I also realize that
having said that, I shall now be required to cough up the evidence. 
I'm working on writing that now, while using different strategies.

   One strategy is to consider objects that have deep cultural and 
historical significance, while simultaneously exploring mathematical
and computing aspects of the same objects. Recently, I have been
exploring physical automata from the past as one representative 
class; however, objects of art can also serve as launching pads.
For an informal automata-related discussion, see my blog on the
subject:  http://creative-automata.com/ . The mathematics, and
indeed "programming," of these artifacts is fascinating.  

   I am working now on curating a "model exhibit" around a sculpture
from the Nasher: http://www.nashersculpturecenter.org/

-p



Paul Fishwick, PhD
Chair, ACM SIGSIM
Distinguished Chair of Arts & Technology 
   and Professor of Computer Science
Director, Creative Automata Laboratory
The University of Texas at Dallas
Arts & Technology
800 West Campbell Road, AT10
Richardson, TX 75080-3021
Home: utdallas.edu/atec/fishwick
Blog: creative-automata.com





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