[Humanist] 27.399 what to call it

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Fri Oct 4 10:23:18 CEST 2013


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 27, No. 399.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Peta Mitchell <peta.mitchell at uq.edu.au>                   (27)
        Subject: Re:  27.394 what to call it

  [2]   From:    Arianna Ciula <ariannaciula at gmail.com>                     (8)
        Subject: Re:  27.394 what to call it

  [3]   From:    "Dr. Hartmut Krech" <kr538 at zfn.uni-bremen.de>             (23)
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 27.394 what to call it

  [4]   From:    orlandi at rmcisadu.let.uniroma1.it                          (13)
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 27.398 confluence of ideas in 1936


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Thu, 3 Oct 2013 06:57:45 +0000
        From: Peta Mitchell <peta.mitchell at uq.edu.au>
        Subject: Re:  27.394 what to call it
        In-Reply-To: <20131003055137.6DA40309A at digitalhumanities.org>


Dear Willard

So my question: who has written best about this sort of thing, and what
has he or she called it?

At the risk of being seen to blow my own horn, I have written about this sort of thing—though I can't say I have written best about it—in my recent book Contagious Metaphor. Network theory has explicitly been framed in terms of (social) contagion going back to Gabriel Tarde in the late nineteenth century, so the two metaphors/concepts have been linked for a substantial period of time. This has become particularly evident in the "viral" network theory espoused by Jussi Parikka, Eugene Thacker, and Tony Sampson, among others, but it's also apparent in Dawkins's meme theory, which posits a networked form of thought contagion. None of this is particularly new, though, because notions of the contagion of example, or contagious influence, go back at least as far as classical theories of mimesis, which are themselves implicitly tied to the figure of Dionysus, the god of mimetic contagion. Other relevant texts might be Bruno Latour's Reassembling the Social, in which he discusses the ambiguity surrounding the notion of the network (and his debt to Tarde's social contagion and network theories) and Derrida's "Rhetoric of Drugs" essay, in which he talks about the "parasitology" and "virology" that is at the heart of his "matrix" of work.

I hope this is relevant and useful.

Regards,
Peta.


_______________________________
Dr Peta Mitchell
Senior Lecturer
School of English, Media Studies, & Art History
The University of Queensland
Brisbane QLD 4072 Australia
CRICOS Provider No: 00025B
p: +61 (0)7 3365 3246
f: +61 (0)7 3365 2799
e: peta.mitchell at uq.edu.au
w: http://uq.academia.edu/PetaMitchell
     http://researchers.uq.edu.au/researcher/781

Office: Michie building, room 617
Map: http://www.uq.edu.au/maps/index.html?menu=1&id=55

UQ ALLY

The UQ Ally program is a joint initiative of UQ and UQ Union.
Allies provide a 'safe zone' for students and staff identifying
as LBGT/I, and promote the University's commitment to
developing a safe and inclusive work and study environment.



--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Thu, 3 Oct 2013 09:03:37 +0200
        From: Arianna Ciula <ariannaciula at gmail.com>
        Subject: Re:  27.394 what to call it
        In-Reply-To: <20131003055137.6DA40309A at digitalhumanities.org>


For some hints to another perspective on the use the concept of networks to
express complex structural relationships in image study (e.g. history of
art) see Warnke, Martin: *What’s in a net? or: The end of the
average.* http://www.kunstgeschichte-ejournal.net/161/  In:
Kunstgeschichte. Open Peer Reviewed Journal, 2011
(urn:nbn:de:bvb:355-kuge-161-5) -
http://www.kunstgeschichte-ejournal.net/161/

Arianna Ciula



--[3]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Thu, 03 Oct 2013 14:11:00 +0200
        From: "Dr. Hartmut Krech" <kr538 at zfn.uni-bremen.de>
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 27.394 what to call it
        In-Reply-To: <20131003055137.6DA40309A at digitalhumanities.org>

Dear Willard,

the ancients called it "symphilosophein" and you may ponder 
its meaning sipping a Sarasvati cocktail sitting by Fonte 
Aretusa in Syracuse. But beware that the synchronicity noted 
is not a synopsis, a construct of your synchronoptic view. 
Is a network model truly more than an extended 
multifactorial cause-effect relationship? Within pathology, 
if you go by its original meaning, it is very certainly a 
causal relationship, despite the interrelatedness and 
interconnectedness of syndromes. Accordingly, one may also 
understand that there is something like intellectual cloning 
within societies overconcerned with social control. 
Intellectual reverse engineering has nothing spontaneous 
about it. But about all of this you have not asked.

Best regards,
Hartmut
http://ww3.de/krech

Am 03/10/2013 07:51, schrieb Humanist Discussion Group:
>>I keep wanting to ask, why are these rivulets flowing together, why do
>>particular people succumb to the virus and not others?
 >>
>>So my question: who has written best about this sort of thing, and what
>>has he or she called it?



--[4]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Thu, 3 Oct 2013 18:11:42 +0200 (CEST)
        From: orlandi at rmcisadu.let.uniroma1.it
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 27.398 confluence of ideas in 1936
        In-Reply-To: <20131003060358.7639F3A3E at digitalhumanities.org>

Surely there was a confluence; but I would like to point
that Turing's solution, unlike Church's, was not only
mathematical but in a sense "operative". I think that
for the birth of computers Turing's intuition is unique.
I write this because I would like to have opinions.

Tito Orlandi

-----------------------------------------------------------------
Tito Orlandi  (olim Univ. di Roma La Sapienza)
Centro Linceo Interdisciplinare Beniamino Segre - Roma
Hiob Ludolf Zentrum (Asien-Afrika-Institut, Univ. Hamburg)
Institutum Patristicum Augustinianum, Roma
http://rmcisadu.let.uniroma1.it/~orlandi
-----------------------------------------------------------------





More information about the Humanist mailing list