[Humanist] 27.569 call for submssions: critical theory; empirical literary studies

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Thu Nov 28 07:16:22 CET 2013


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 27, No. 569.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    "JLT, Deutsche Philologie" <JLT at phil.uni-goettingen.de>   (18)
        Subject: Call for Submissions - Empirical Methods in Literary Studies

  [2]   From:    Delia Dumitrica <dddumitr at ucalgary.ca>                    (34)
        Subject: Reminder - CfP: Digital Technologies and Social
                Transformations: What Role for Critical Theory?


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Wed, 27 Nov 2013 10:15:22 +0000
        From: "JLT, Deutsche Philologie" <JLT at phil.uni-goettingen.de>
        Subject: Call for Submissions - Empirical Methods in Literary Studies


Call for Submissions

Journal of Literary Theory Vol. 9, No. 1 (2015)

Special Issue: Empirical Methods in Literary Studies

Editors: Fotis Jannidis (Wuerzburg, Germany), Gerhard Lauer (Goettingen, Germany), Simone Winko (Goettingen, Germany)

Empirical methods have a humble yet continuous tradition in literary studies. It is a tradition that seems to stand in fundamental opposition to historical and hermeneutical approaches due to differences concerning the practice of validation, reliability and extensiveness of their claims. JLT is interested in publishing articles that take a theoretical and systematic perspective on the question how empirical methods – despite those differences – might fit into the research practices of literary studies. How can both approaches complement each other? How can established questions in literary studies be answered differently (or maybe even more satisfyingly) by using empirical approaches? How does literature as a subject matter change through the use of empirical approaches, such as methods from the cognitive sciences or computer based processes? Which preconditions should (still) be clarified, so that empirical methods can become part of the literary studies?

We encourage submissions from all language and literature departments as well as other fields within the humanities and social sciences. Contributions should not exceed 50,000 characters in length and have to be submitted until August 1, 2014. Please submit your contribution electronically via our website http://www.jltonline.de under "Articles". Articles are chosen for publication by an international advisory board in a double-blind review process.

For further information about JLT and to view the submission guidelines, please visit http://www.jltonline.de/index.php/articles  ("About JLT" and "For Authors") or contact the editorial office at jlt at phil.uni-goettingen.de<mailto:jlt at phil.uni-goettingen.de>.

Jan Borkowski

Assistant Editor
JLT - Journal of Literary Theory
Georg-August-Universität Goettingen
Seminar fuer Deutsche Philologie
Kaete-Hamburger-Weg 3
37073 Goettingen
0049 - (0)551 - 39 - 7516
JLT at phil.uni-goettingen.de<mailto:JLT at phil.uni-goettingen.de>
http://www.JLTonline.de
http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/jlt



--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Wed, 27 Nov 2013 20:01:22 +0000
        From: Delia Dumitrica <dddumitr at ucalgary.ca>
        Subject: Reminder - CfP: Digital Technologies and Social Transformations: What Role for Critical Theory?
        In-Reply-To: <63e4726c35fb4ee5e4a595e88927da38.squirrel at webmail.ucalgary.ca>


Reminder: The submission deadline for the special issue of the Canadian
Journal of Communication (Digital Technologies and Social Transformations:
What Role for Critical Theory?) is coming up on December 1, 2013.

For more information on the call for papers, please visit:
http://www.cjc-online.ca/index.php/journal/announcement/view/197

We invite authors to submit papers exploring the use of critical theory in
research on digital technologies with reference to diverse themes and
cases, including, but not limited to studies of:

- Digital technologies and democratic/economic empowerment (e.g.
destabilizing authoritarian regimes; alleviating the democratic deficit;
including marginalized or disenfranchised groups; new forms of politics,
etc.);
- Digital technologies and the state (e.g. security; cybercrime; public
policy; governance, etc.);
- Digital technologies and power in everyday life (e.g. cyber-identity;
sociability; social ties; social capital; networks; mundane Panopticism;
etc.);
- Digital technologies and relations of production (e.g. immaterial labor;
knowledge creation/mobilization; big data; cloud computing; cultural
production; etc.);
- Digital technologies in social sciences (e.g. critical thinking; modes
of learning; evaluation and monitoring of scholarly labor, gamification,
etc.).

Extended abstracts (600 words) will be accepted until December 1, 2013.
Abstracts should explicitly discuss how the role of power/ critical theory
will be addressed in the context of the respective argument/ case. Please
include a prospective title, 5-7 keywords and a short bio-note about
yourself. We welcome abstracts in either English or French.

To submit your abstract, or for any further queries regarding this special
issue, please contact the issue editors directly: cjcissue at ucalgary.ca

Dr. Delia Dumitrica
Department of Communication and Culture
University of Calgary






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