[Humanist] 27.565 model, modelling, simulation

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Thu Nov 28 07:09:03 CET 2013


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 27, No. 565.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Stanislav Roudavski <srou at unimelb.edu.au>                 (15)
        Subject: model, modelling, simulation

  [2]   From:    Joris van Zundert <joris.van.zundert at huygens.knaw.nl>     (89)
        Subject: Re:  27.564 model, modelling, simulation


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Wed, 27 Nov 2013 08:23:23 +0000
        From: Stanislav Roudavski <srou at unimelb.edu.au>
        Subject: model, modelling, simulation

What an interesting discussion...

...as I have materially experienced in a recent workshop, the understanding of simulation in medical fields tends to be very inclusive/hybrid. Participants of medical simulations (that are rather like interactive theatrical performances) include trained professionals, students, lay people, actors, real patients, manikins of varying fidelity, equipment, mock-ups of equipment, props, interactive artifacts, computational simulations, educational documents, scenarios, solution-oriented tasks, error-search tasks, real or imagined places, architectural structures, etc. The challenge there is often not to match a known or hypothesized process but to create a relatively safe (magic circle? game?) situations that can be immersive on one hand and open for critical reflection, assessment, tinkering and redesign on the other. Such simulations can often be modified in-process as well as between runs...

In a response to the Willard McCarty's question: "Are VR applications essentially visualized simulations?" I can offer this recent paper that discusses VR/VE applications as hybrid, multiplicious (porous? friable?) performances akin to the ones outlined above. In my interpretation, such performances can include visualizations/presentations of well-bounded models/simulations but are not equivalent to them.

https://www.academia.edu/5185272/Portmanteau_Worlds_Hosting_Multiple_Worldviews_in_Virtual_Environments

Hope this is of interest. Happy to hear opinions.

---
Dr Stanislav Roudavski

The University of Melbourne
Senior Lecturer in Digital Architectural Design

Elseware Collective; ExLab
Founding Partner

personal: http://stanislavroudavski.net
collaborative: http://elsewarecollective.com, http://www.exlab.org
publications: http://unimelb.academia.edu/StanislavRoudavski/Papers
tutorials: https://vimeo.com/exlab



--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Wed, 27 Nov 2013 09:51:44 +0100
        From: Joris van Zundert <joris.van.zundert at huygens.knaw.nl>
        Subject: Re:  27.564 model, modelling, simulation
        In-Reply-To: <20131127070540.B09842EE7 at digitalhumanities.org>


Dear Willard,

I wonder if your definition for modeling a process maybe be skewing a bit
too much towards the analytical potential or simulation aspect of process?
There are contexts I suppose where model/modeling is an appropriate
description of the activities undertaken to capture a process and where–as
you say–the outcome of the process is not entirely predictable, but where
in contrast to that the process modeling is exactly aimed at keeping the
outcome within in certain bounds.

I'm thinking for instance of the situation where one is modeling a workflow
process into software or from existing software components. Say, in the
case of a workflow for digital editing. If everything works out well we
deliver an non (essentially?) analytical tool that supports editors and
researchers to capture and represent text as data, but the modeling of the
workflow is such that the data captured eventually turn into a
representational form (the digital edition) that has certain conformity.

I do think this situation holds to your definition of "when you can only
know about the components of something and cannot observe or predict what
the thing will do". But in this form it suggest that the (partial)
unpredictability is in a way an aim. Yet in workflow process modeling I'd
say the aim is to root out as much as possible unpredictability from the
resulting artifacts.

I think this raises questions about the reciprocal effects process model
and object model have on each other. Or maybe I'm just unnecessarily
confusing matters, in which case I'll let myself be happily corrected.

All the best
--Joris

On Wed, Nov 27, 2013 at 8:05 AM, Humanist Discussion Group <
willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk> wrote:

>                  Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 27, No. 564.
>             Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
>                        www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
>                 Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
>
>
>
>         Date: Wed, 27 Nov 2013 06:55:25 +0000
>         From: Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
>         Subject: model, modelling, simulation
>
> Thanks to Peter van Kranenburg in Humanist 27.558 for pointing out that
> simulations are tinkered with between runs, or simulation-games after
> the playing is done, and to Paul Fishwick for pointing out that
> modelling extends to much of what we do with our tools. The latter has
> essentially been my argument all along -- that modelling is basically
> what we do most of the time.
>
> To pick up on Peter's summary, that a simulation is "a specific kind of
> model, namely one that represents a process", let me ask, when would you
> be modelling a process rather than a thing? The answer I keep coming up
> with is, when you can only know about the components of something and
> cannot observe or predict what the thing will do. So, I could model a
> particular game of Monopoly, tweaking, say, the prices of houses on a
> particular patch of the board, but a model of Monopoly itself, with some
> (pseudo-)randomization, when run is a simulation of capitalist activity.
> Carolyn Lougee Chappell's Would-Be Gentleman, from the mid 1980s and
> still going, is an instructional simulation-game of the
> petite-bourgeoisie in 17C France. SimCity from the late 1980s, also
> still going, is likewise a simulation -- a game that models urban
> entities but whose outcome in any play is unknown to a significant degree.
>
> Can we say that the difference is between simple and complex, linear and
> non-linear systems? What other examples do we have in the humanities?
> Are VR applications essentially visualised simulations?
>
> Yours,
> WM
> --
> Willard McCarty (www.mccarty.org.uk/), Professor, Department of Digital
> Humanities, King's College London, and Research Group in Digital
> Humanities, University of Western Sydney


-- 
Drs. Joris J. van Zundert

*Researcher & Developer Digital and Computational Humanities*
Huygens Institute for the History of the Netherlands

*Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences*
www.huygens.knaw.nl/en/vanzundert/

-------

*Jack Sparrow: I thought you were supposed to keep to the code.Mr. Gibbs:
We figured they were more actual guidelines.*





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