[Humanist] 26.922 open access

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Fri Mar 29 09:21:46 CET 2013


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 26, No. 922.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    John Levin <john at anterotesis.com>                         (30)
        Subject: Re:  26.911 open access

  [2]   From:    Marin Dacos <marin.dacos at openedition.org>                 (73)
        Subject: French scholars say 'oui' to open access

  [3]   From:    "Holly C. Shulman" <hcs8n at virginia.edu>                  (181)
        Subject: Re:  26.914 open access

  [4]   From:    "Lele, Amod" <lele at bu.edu>                                (18)
        Subject: Re:  26.919 open access


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Thu, 28 Mar 2013 07:51:55 +0000
        From: John Levin <john at anterotesis.com>
        Subject: Re:  26.911 open access
        In-Reply-To: <20130326062046.F1FC62CE8 at digitalhumanities.org>

On 26/03/2013 06:20, Humanist Discussion Group wrote:
>
>                   Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 26, No. 911.
>              Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
>                         www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
>                  Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
>
>
>
>          Date: Mon, 25 Mar 2013 09:31:58 +0000
>          From: "James O'Sullivan" <josullivan.c at gmail.com>
>          Subject: Re:  26.909 open access
>          In-Reply-To: <20130325062744.926962DA2 at digitalhumanities.org>
>
>
> I don't think it's quite accurate to say that most academics have released
> something as open access -- I think of numerous tools, major and minor,
> that might well be free, but aren't open source.

Which is not what I said, nor what you originally charged. You stated 
that "Many people who champion open access have not actually had 
something to release as open access."

My response was: "I can't think of any champion, academic or otherwise, 
of openaccess that doesn't have something to release on such terms, or 
hasn't done so already."

It is about what advocates for open access do, not for all academia.

John

-- 
John Levin
http://www.anterotesis.com
http://twitter.com/anterotesis



--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Thu, 28 Mar 2013 11:08:03 +0100
        From: Marin Dacos <marin.dacos at openedition.org>
        Subject: French scholars say 'oui' to open access
        In-Reply-To: <20130326062046.F1FC62CE8 at digitalhumanities.org>


Dear all,

Times Higher Education has published an article titled  "French scholars
say ‘oui’ to open access". Here it is.
http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/news/french-scholars-say-oui-to-open-access/2002825.article

We have organized two days ago an open access meeting in Paris Sorbonne.
The auditorium was full of scholars, journals directors, librarians. For
those who can read French, a journalist has reported this public session :
http://speakingofscience.docteo.net/2013/03/27/open-access-en-shs-lintendance-suivra/I
would like to point out the 2 minutes speach of Pierre Mounier, deputy
director of OpenEdition, explaining why open access is so important for
him, "the last roman", because he was a latinist, considered as an
endangered species. You can listen his improvised talk during the
discussion :
https://soundcloud.com/speaking-of-science/pierre-mounier-cleo-message-open-accessWhat
message wants humanist give to the world? Are we the last Mohican, or
have we a project for the future? Thanks, Pierre, for such sincerity and
clear view of the future!

Best regards,
Marin Dacos

http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/news/french-scholars-say-oui-to-open-access/2002825.articleFrench
scholars say ‘oui’ to open access

28 MARCH 2013 | BY PAUL
JUMP http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/paul-jump/1074.bio

Senior humanities and social science academics come out in support of move
to ‘take knowledge out of silos’

 [image: Padlock and chain]

Sixty senior figures from the humanities and social sciences in France have
published a statement in national newspaper *Le Monde* in support of open
access.

The signatories, who include university presidents, librarians and journal
editors, warn that if the humanities and social sciences were to opt out of
wider moves towards open access they “would become isolated and ultimately
extinct”. The statement, titled “Who Is Afraid of Open Access?”, was
published on 15 March and has received more than 2,000 endorsements on a
dedicated website, I love open access  http://iloveopenaccess.org/ .

Its publication follows a statement in February by representatives of more
than 120 journals and 50 publishers - specialising in French humanities and
social sciences - which expressed concern that the European Commission’s
open-access policy for its Horizon 2020 funding period would stifle
subscription income, leading to “the disappearance of the vast majority of
journals published in French”.

The publishers’ statement added that the French government had given
assurances that it did not feel in “any way bound” to adopt the maximum
12-month “green” embargo length advocated by the Commission.

The academics’ riposte in *Le Monde* describes the publishers’ fears as
“largely groundless”, noting that a “thorough assessment of the sector
would be required to provide a true cost-benefit analysis” of open access.

It says open access has the potential to “take knowledge out of silos” and
allow it to play its “pivotal role” in the “collective growth” of society.

The statement also highlights the success of open access in Latin America,
which it says demonstrates its potential to break the dominance of
English-language journals, enabling a “plurality of viewpoints, modes of
publication, scientific paradigms, and languages”.

To fear open access is “to commit oneself to a narrow - and, in fact,
erroneous - vision of the future”, it says. “The humanities and social
sciences can be at the forefront of this opening movement precisely because
there is an increasing social demand for their research results.”

paul.jump at tsleducation.com

 PRINT HEADLINE:

Article originally published as: *French say ‘oui’ to open access* (28
March 2013

-- 
Marin Dacos - http://www.openedition.org
Director - Centre for Open Electronic Publishing

** OpenEdition is now a Facility of
Excellence http://www.openedition.org/10221?lang=en
* *(Equipex) **
** New email : marin.dacos at openedition.org **

CNRS - EHESS - Aix-Marseille Université (AMU) - Université d'Avignon
3, place Victor Hugo, Case n°86, 13331 Marseille Cedex 3 - France
Tél : 04 13 55 03 40 Tél. direct : 04 13 55 03 39 Fax : 04 13 55 03 41
Skype : marin.dacos - Gmail video chat : marin.dacos at gmail.com
Twitter : http://twitter.com/#!/marindacos



--[3]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Thu, 28 Mar 2013 09:28:04 -0400
        From: "Holly C. Shulman" <hcs8n at virginia.edu>
        Subject: Re:  26.914 open access
        In-Reply-To: <20130327061307.2C98B2DD9 at digitalhumanities.org>


RE: Online Access.  There needs to be some discussion of economic viability
and the financial pressures that are assaulting University education and
research in today's political environment.  But beyond that, I simply want
to point out that there are times when a reviewer of a submitted article
for a peer-reviewed journal makes good, thoughtful, helpful comments.  I
don't think peer review is simply a barrier nor do I think it is simply a
manifestation of an old-boys (and girls) club.  It can be that.  But it can
also be a step toward refining an article that is very helpful to the
writer.  My evidence, I admit, is my own experience, so it is small and
anecdotal, but I have a hunch that this can be true for everyone.  (I also
have had comments that are silly or ignorant or biased, I admit).  I think
we demean ourselves and our fields if we see open access as a work around
old-fashioned, boring, scholarship.

Holly Shulman


-- 
Holly C. Shulman
Editor, Dolley Madison Digital Edition
Founding Director, Documents Compass
Research Professor, Department of History
University of Virginia
434-243-8881
hcs8n at virginia.edu



--[4]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Thu, 28 Mar 2013 14:13:50 +0000
        From: "Lele, Amod" <lele at bu.edu>
        Subject: Re:  26.919 open access
        In-Reply-To: <20130328062330.CE1CD2CC6 at digitalhumanities.org>

I would concur with Daniel and James. I personally find blogging a more
rewarding venue for humanistic scholarship than academic journals, and I
love that I can make it completely open-access. But I only started my blog
when I knew I was *leaving* the academic job market.

It's good to have ideals for what academia and scholarship should be, and
to work to make that vision come about. But we should never confuse our
vision of what should be with our perception of what really is. I would
love to live in a world where nobody is hired for having a pile of dull
articles hidden away in dusty journals that nobody reads. But I don't.

-- 
Amod Lele, PhD
Educational Technologist
Boston University
Office: 617-358-6909
Mobile: 617-645-9857
lele at bu.edu

Blog: loveofallwisdom.com






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