[Humanist] 26.859 the turn turn

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Fri Mar 8 07:26:50 CET 2013


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 26, No. 859.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org



        Date: Thu, 07 Mar 2013 07:59:01 +0000
        From: John Levin <john at anterotesis.com>
        Subject: Re:  26.843 the turn turn?
        In-Reply-To: <20130303112659.6F5222CD4 at digitalhumanities.org>


On 03/03/2013 11:26, Humanist Discussion Group wrote:
>
>                   Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 26, No. 843.
>              Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
>                         www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
>                  Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
>
>
>
>          Date: Sun, 03 Mar 2013 10:50:08 +0000
>          From: Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
>          Subject: the turn turn
>
> For reasons (I assure you) having to do with computing I have found
> myself wondering about the outbreak of turns. The OED considers Jonathan
> Swift's usage in A Project for the Advancement of Religion, and the
> Reformation of Manners: By a Person of Quality (1709), "This is not to
> be accomplished...but by introducing Religion as much as possible to be
> the Turn and Fashion of the Age", meaning "That to which (the age or
> time) is disposed", to be rare. It seems to me to fit our habit of
> reference to "the linguistic turn", "the spatial turn", ad nauseam,
> rather well. I wonder first when this habit began with reference to
> disciplinary inclinations and whether anyone has done the homework and
> written about it.
>

An interesting article criticizing 'turns' is
Katrina Navickas' "'Why I am tired of turning’: a theoretical interlude"
http://www.historyworkingpapers.org/?page_id=225

My personal feeling is that the current 'spatial turn' is qualitatively 
different to those preceding because it is fundamentally driven, or 
enabled, by the new NoGIS / neogeographic technologies, such as Google 
Maps etc.

I'd very much like to read Willard's reasons 'having to do with 
computing' that led him to ask this question.

Regards

John

-- 
John Levin
http://www.anterotesis.com
http://twitter.com/anterotesis





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