[Humanist] 26.844 the turn turnings

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Mon Mar 4 10:28:17 CET 2013


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 26, No. 844.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Mark Davies <Mark_Davies at byu.edu>                         (19)
        Subject: RE:  26.843 the turn turn?

  [2]   From:    Alan Corre <corre at uwm.edu>                                 (2)
        Subject: The turn, turn

  [3]   From:    "Dr. Robert Delius Royar PhD" <r.royar at moreheadstate.edu>  (4)
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 26.843 the turn turn?

  [4]   From:    Manfred Thaller <manfred.thaller at uni-koeln.de>            (61)
        Subject: Re:  26.843 the turn turn?


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Sun, 3 Mar 2013 14:03:41 +0000
        From: Mark Davies <Mark_Davies at byu.edu>
        Subject: RE:  26.843 the turn turn?
        In-Reply-To: <20130303112659.6F5222CD4 at digitalhumanities.org>

>> "The spatial turn" begins its steep rise ca 1986-7. What other turns are 
>> there? ... What does the metaphor itself suggest is going on?

See the different adjectives (by decade) occurring with "turn" since the early 1800s: http://googlebooks.byu.edu/?c=us&q=21436904
Also, adjectives with "turn" that are more common recently (left) than in the 1800s (right): http://googlebooks.byu.edu/?c=us&q=21436930

Remember that with the standard Google Books interface, all that one can do is look at the frequency of a given word (e.g. "turn"), which is not very insightful. With the Advanced/BYU interface for the Google Books n-grams (http://googlebooks.byu.edu), you can actually see *which collocates* are occurring with a given word and also compare between two different time periods directly (see http://googlebooks.byu.edu/compare-googleBooks.asp). This provides much more insightful analyses than with the simplistic, standard Google Books interface (http://books.google.com/ngrams), as in this case with "turn".

I'll be discussing this much more at the April 2013 workshop at U Indiana: "What Can We Do With 500 Billion Words?": http://mypage.iu.edu/~meldye/workshop/schedule.html

Best,

Mark Davies

============================================
Mark Davies
Professor of Linguistics / Brigham Young University
http://davies-linguistics.byu.edu/

** Corpus design and use // Linguistic databases **
** Historical linguistics // Language variation **
** English, Spanish, and Portuguese **


--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Sun, 3 Mar 2013 08:54:11 -0600 (CST)
        From: Alan Corre <corre at uwm.edu>
        Subject: The turn, turn


Pete Seeger is well known for the hit song "Turn, Turn". The lyrics are all taken from the Biblical book of Ecclesiastes, chapter three, with the sole exception of the words "turn, turn" which were added by Pete. Accordingly the Byrds, who recorded in 1965, hold the record for a number one hit with the oldest lyrics. King Solomon must be happy.

Alan Corré



--[3]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Sun, 3 Mar 2013 10:39:41 -0500
        From: "Dr. Robert Delius Royar PhD" <r.royar at moreheadstate.edu>
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 26.843 the turn turn?
        In-Reply-To: <20130303112659.6F5222CD4 at digitalhumanities.org>

Perhaps the turn is simply a trope (or some other form of tortuous metaphor)?

-- 
 Dr. Robert Delius Royar PhD, Associate Professor of English
 Morehead State University     r.royar at moreheadstate.edu



--[4]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 04 Mar 2013 08:26:42 +0100
        From: Manfred Thaller <manfred.thaller at uni-koeln.de>
        Subject: Re:  26.843 the turn turn?
        In-Reply-To: <20130303112659.6F5222CD4 at digitalhumanities.org>

Dear Willard,
there even seems to be multiple turns.

For me as a historian the "iconic turn", describing the idea, that 
visual sources (aka: pictures) could be changed from illustrations to 
primary sources of historical reasoning, is a memory of the seventies - 
and the first o fall "turns". Ngram nicely confirms, that this turn got 
somehow forgotten in the eighties, but had a spectacular revival with 
the internet making images available as they are now, describing a 
completely different "turn" nowadays.

Kind regards,
Manfred

Am 03.03.2013 12:26, schrieb Humanist Discussion Group:
>                   Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 26, No. 843.
>              Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
>                         www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
>                  Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
>
>
>
>          Date: Sun, 03 Mar 2013 10:50:08 +0000
>          From: Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
>          Subject: the turn turn
>
> For reasons (I assure you) having to do with computing I have found
> myself wondering about the outbreak of turns. The OED considers Jonathan
> Swift's usage in A Project for the Advancement of Religion, and the
> Reformation of Manners: By a Person of Quality (1709), "This is not to
> be accomplished...but by introducing Religion as much as possible to be
> the Turn and Fashion of the Age", meaning "That to which (the age or
> time) is disposed", to be rare. It seems to me to fit our habit of
> reference to "the linguistic turn", "the spatial turn", ad nauseam,
> rather well. I wonder first when this habit began with reference to
> disciplinary inclinations and whether anyone has done the homework and
> written about it.
>
> The phrase "the linguistic turn" was still new enough in 1961 that
> Richard Rorty, in "Recent Metaphilosophy", Review of Metaphysics 15.2:
> 304, puts the phrase in scare-quotes. (Rorty cites Edward W. Hall's
> Philosophical Systems: A Categorical Analysis (1960) but as far as I can
> tell imports it from elsewhere.) Rorty's The Linguistic Turn (1967)
> seems to have marked its emergence into common usage. Google's n-gram
> viewer has it starting its steep ascent ca 1980 -- and shows it
> beginning to descend in 2003. Timothy Williamson's "Past the Linguistic
> Turn", published in Brian Leiter's The Future for Philosophy in 2004,
> suggests the same.
>
> "The spatial turn" begins its steep rise ca 1986-7. What other turns are
> there? Is this a case of linguistic contagion? By all this turning will we
> (with apologies to Elder Joseph) in any sense "come 'round right"?
> What does the metaphor itself suggest is going on?
>
> Yours,
> WM

-- 
Prof. Dr. Manfred Thaller
Historisch-Kulturwissenschaftliche Informationsverarbeitung, Universität
zu Köln
Humanities Computer Science, University at Cologne
Postadresse / Mailing address: Albertus-Magnus-Platz, D 50923 Köln
Besuchsadresse / Visiting address: Kerpener Str. 30, Eingang Weyertal, II. Stock
Tel. +49 - 221 - 470 3022, FAX +49 - 221 - 470 7737





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