[Humanist] 27.140 computationalists and humanists

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Thu Jun 20 22:02:58 CEST 2013


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 27, No. 140.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org



        Date: Thu, 20 Jun 2013 09:24:10 +0800
        From: Tim Finney <tjf at tfinney.net>
        Subject: Re:  27.133 computationalists and humanists
        In-Reply-To: <20130619200947.7CDB32DE2 at digitalhumanities.org>


Dear All,

I reject the assertion that I am an outlier, but judge for yourself:

An infinitesimal, it is said,
isn't enough to do in your head;
what you really need for that,
is to consider old Fermat.

Best,

Tim Finney
No fixed academic address

On 06/20/2013 04:09 AM, Humanist Discussion Group wrote:
>                   Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 27, No. 133.
>              Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
>                         www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
>                  Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
>
>
>
>          Date: Tue, 18 Jun 2013 21:28:13 +0000
>          From: Martin Mueller <martinmueller at northwestern.edu>
>          Subject: Re:  27.125 computationalists and humanists
>          In-Reply-To: <20130616200327.BFD8A2E34 at digitalhumanities.org>
>
> A wonderful post, but Kleist was an outlier in more than one way and the
> odds of increasing the number of people who can do calculus and write
> verse is quite small. And coming from a somewhat different there is a
> colleague who once said something like "the problem of the Digital
> Humanities is that there are very few problems that humanists find useful
> and computer scientists find interesting." A lot of good projects have
> probably been done by folks from different parts of the aisle whose
> private views about the other are not necessarily printable.
>
> At a practical and institutional level, it may well be that good solutions
> will come from renegotiating traditional ways of dividing work among
> academic departments, libraries, and IT departments.  Adenauer is supposed
> to have said "Man muss die Menschen nehmen wie sie kommen, denn es gibt
> keine anderen" or "you have to take people as they come because there are
> no others." And people as they come tend to be very much on one side or
> the other. So we need to find institutional solutions that make them work
> together in tolerable harmony.
>
> There is a charming quote about diplomatics in Wikipedia: Christopher
> Brooke  a distinguished teacher of diplomatics, referred to the reputation
> of the discipline in 1970 as that of "a formidable and dismal science ...
> a kind of game played by a few scholars, most of them medievalists,
> harmless so long as it does not dominate or obscure historical enquiry;
> or, perhaps, most commonly of all, an aid to understanding of considerable
> use to scholars and research students if only they had time to spare from
> more serious pursuits".
>
> Quite a few of the current problems of DH are captured in that remark. And
> come to think of it, a lot of digital humanists started as medievalists.
>
>
>
>
>
> Martin Mueller
>
> Professor of English and Classics
> Northwestern University





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