[Humanist] 27.129 computationalists and humanists

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Tue Jun 18 22:34:01 CEST 2013


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 27, No. 129.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org



        Date: Tue, 18 Jun 2013 06:10:51 +0100
        From: Alexander O'Connor <Alex.OConnor at scss.tcd.ie>
        Subject: Re:  27.126 computationalists and humanists
        In-Reply-To: <20130617210523.50BE4F92 at digitalhumanities.org>


Hi All,

Out of curiosity, and perhaps to ask a computationalist's questions, do we have an idea of the proportions of each constituency on this list?

 I am certainly an engineer / computer scientist by training and job, for one.   

 Hope it's not crass self-promotion, but I wrote on this a while ago. https://medium.com/i-m-h-o/82853fb99fc8

Regards

Alex--  
Dr. Alexander O'Connor
-
Research Fellow
-
Knowledge & Data Engineering Group
School of Computer Science & Statistics
Trinity College Dublin, Ireland.

On Monday 17 June 2013 at 22:05, Humanist Discussion Group wrote:

>  
> Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 27, No. 126.
> Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
> www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
> Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
>  
> [1] From: James Smithies <james.smithies at canterbury.ac.nz> (134)
> Subject: Re: 27.125 computationalists and humanists
>  
> [2] From: Amlan Dasgupta <amlan04 at gmail.com> (118)
> Subject: Re: 27.125 computationalists and humanists
>  
> [3] From: lachance at chass.utoronto.ca (12)
> Subject: town and gown
>  
>  
> --[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
> Date: Mon, 17 Jun 2013 00:26:25 +0000
> From: James Smithies <james.smithies at canterbury.ac.nz>
> Subject: Re: 27.125 computationalists and humanists
>  
> Wonderfully said, Chris. Your comment that "[t]he lamented conflict
> between "computationalists" and "humanists" arises
> as soon as we become afraid of our own courage and shy away from jumping
> across these two fault lines" reminds me of turning up for work with a
> technical Systems Analysis team, doctorate in History in hand, to find one
> of my new colleagues spoke 5 languages and was teaching himself ancient
> Greek, and another was a classical musician. I don't want to offer a
> misleading account, because prejudices against the humanities remain
> strong in some areas of the business / IT world I'm drawing my examples
> from, but generalisations often break down in the face of reality too.
>  
> Too often, as well, we assume that it's only the humanists who want to
> jump the divide, which is not true. Some of my most intellectually
> satisfying conversations have been undertaken over lunch, in a large open
> IT office, lazily discussing the interface between computer science and
> the humanities. Talk to people who know their predicate logic, classical
> music, ancient Greek, .xml, and Java, and you soon realise that the
> distinctions we're discussing here obfuscate more than they illuminate.
> I'm supportive of disciplinary specialisation, but there's something to be
> said for spaces - like the digital humanities - where cross-fertilisation
> is encouraged.
>  
> Regards,
> James
[...]





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