[Humanist] 27.622 events: The Connected Past

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Sat Dec 14 08:23:40 CET 2013


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 27, No. 622.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org



        Date: Fri, 13 Dec 2013 02:21:15 -0800 (PST)
        From: Tom Brughmans <tom.brughmans at yahoo.com>
        Subject: Registration open The Connected Past conference in Paris


The Connected Past conference
(French version below)

We would like to invite you to The Connected Past conference on network
analysis in archaeology and history, held 26 April in Paris (just after the
Computer Applications and Quantitative methods in Archaeology conference in
Paris). More info and a programme can be found below or on our website:
http://connectedpast.soton.ac.uk/conference-2014/ . Registration is free but
since places are limited tickets will be allocated on a
first-come-first-serve basis.

Looking forward to seeing you there!

The Connected Past A satellite conference at CAA 2014, Paris

Held Saturday April 26th 2014 in Sciences Po, rooms Albert Sorel and Anatole
Leroy-Beaulieu, 27 rue Saint-Guillaume, 75007 Paris (metro
Saint-Germain-des-Prés or Rue du Bac). Building A on this map.

With the Support of Sciences Po, the DYREM research program, Médialab, the
CAA committee, and the French network of historical network analysis.
Organisers: Claire Lemercier (CNRS, Sciences Po, Paris), Tom Brughmans
(University of Southampton), The Connected Past steering committee.   The
conference aims to: 

	* Provide a forum for the presentation of network-based research applied to
archaeological or historical questions

	* Discuss the practicalities and implications of applying network
perspectives and methodologies to archaeological and historical data in
particular

	* Strengthen the group of researchers interested in the potential of
network approaches for archaeology and history

	* Foster cross-disciplinary dialogue and collaborative work towards
integrated analytical frameworks for understanding complex networks

	* Stimulate debate about the application of network theory and analysis
within archaeology and history in particular, but also more widely, and
highlight the relevance of this work for the continued development of
network theory in other disciplines

Read the complete call for papers

The conference will be held immediately after the CAA conference (Computer
Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology), also happening in
Paris, allowing participants to easily attend both – but participants from
other disciplines, especially history, are also most welcome. A “The
Connected Past” practical workshop, “Introduction to network analysis
for archaeologists” will also be organized during CAA2014 in Paris (see
the CAA programme).

Oral presentations will be limited to 15 minutes so as to leave room for
discussion. Most talk will be given in English, but some might be given in
French and accompanied by English abstracts and presentations. French
questions or answers will be welcome and translated during the debates.
Posters will also be displayed and, in addition to specific conversations
taking place during the pauses, their authors will be given 2 minutes each
for a very short oral presentation.

There are no attendance fees. Although this event is free of charge,
registration is required and the number of places is limited. Places will be
allocated on a first-come-first-serve basis. The Connected Past is a
community led by a multi-disciplinary international steering committee. It
aims to provide discussion platforms for the development of original and
critical applications of network and complexity approaches to archaeology
and history. To this purpose The Connected Past organises international
conferences, focused seminars and practical didactic workshops.

Programme

All the presentations and posters have been confirmed, but the exact
programmeis still subject to minor changes

Saturday 26 April

9-9.45 Welcome coffee and introduction
9.45-11 First session: Mobility through networks
Eivind Heldaas Seland: Tracing trade routes as networks: From Palmyra to
the Persian Gulf in the first three centuries CE
Henrik Gerding and Per Östborn: Network analyses of the diffusion of
Hellenistic fired bricks
Marie Lezowski: Cohesion through mobility : the networks of relics in
17th-century Lombardy
11-11.15 Coffee break
11.15-12.30 Second session: Dynamics and cross-period comparisons
Habiba, Jan C. Athenstädt and Ulrik Brandes: Inferring Social Dynamics from
Spatio-Temporal Network Data in the US Southwest
Ana Sofia Ribeiro: Resilience in times of Early Modern financial crises: the
case study of Simon Ruiz network, 1553-1606
Marion Beetschen: Social Network Analysis as a Complementary Methodological
Tool in History
12.30-13.45 Lunch break
13.45-15 Third session: Cross-cultural networks
Angus A. A. Mol and Floris W. M. Keehnen: Tying up Columbus: A historical
and material culture study of the networks that resulted from the first
European voyages into the Caribbean (AD 1492-1504)
Francisco Apellaniz: Cooperating in Complex Environments: Cross-cultural
Trade, Commercial Networks and Notarial Culture in Alexandria (Egypt) :
1350-1500
Florencia Del Castillo and Joan Anton Barceló: Inferring the intensity of
Social Network from radiocarbon dated Bronze Age archaeological contexts
15-15.15 Coffee break
15-15.50 Fourth session: Political interactions
Stanley Théry: Social network analysis between Tours notables and Louis XI
(1461-1483)
Laurent Beauguitte: Models of historical networks: A methodological proposal
15.50-16.45 Final session, including a very short (2 minutes) oral
presentation for each poster, discussion of the posters and final general
discussion

Posters by:

Zeynep Aktüre: The Ancient Theatre Network in the Mediterranean: A
Structuralist Interpretation Inspired from Fernand Braudel’s Three Planes of
Historical Time
Thibault Clérice and Anthony Glaise: Network analysis and distant reading: The
Cicero’s Network
Damian Koniarek, Renata Madziara and Piotr Szymański: Towards a study of the
structure of the business & science social network of the 2nd Polish
Republic
Susana Marcos: Familial alliances, social links et geographical network. The
example of the province of Lusitania in the Roman Empire (to be confirmed)
Stefania Merlo Perring: The ChartEx Project. Reconstructing spatial
relationships from medieval charters: a collaboration between Data Mining and
Historical Topography
Sébastien Putniak: Archaeology as practical mereology: an attempt to analyze a
set of ceramic refits using network analysis tools
Grégoire van Havre: Interactions and network analysis of a rock art site in
Morro do Chapéu, Bahia, Brazil
Beatrice Zucca Micheletto: Network analysis and gender's studies: some issues
from the Italian case (Turin, 17th-18th centuries)
16.45 Drinks and informal discussion

—- French version —–

The Connected Past
Dans le cadre du congrès CAA 2014 (informatique et méthodes quantitatives en
archéologie) à Paris

Un événement organisé par le
réseau “The Connected Past”
Avec le soutien de Sciences Po
Paris, du programme de recherche DYREM, du Médialab, the CAA committee, et du groupe Res-Hist, Réseaux et Histoire

Samedi 26 avril 2014 à Sciences
Po, amphithéâtres Albert Sorel et Anatole Leroy-Beaulieu, 27 rue
Saint-Guillaume, 75007 Paris (métro Saint-Germain-des-Prés ou Rue du Bac)

Organisation : Claire Lemercier
(CNRS, Sciences Po, Paris), Tom Brughmans (University of Southampton), le
comité scientifique de The Connected Past

“The Connected Past” est un
groupe de chercheurs doté d’un comité scientifique international et
interdisciplinaire. Son objectif est d’offrir des lieux de discussion autour du
développement d’applications originales des approches en termes de réseaux et
de complexité en archéologie et en histoire. Pour cela, il organise depuis 2011
des colloques, séminaires et ateliers de formation.

Les objectifs de la journée sont de :
* Proposer un lieu commun de présentation pour des recherches appliquant des approches des réseaux à des questions archéologiques ou historiques
* Discuter les spécificités et les implications de ces approches pour ces questions et types de données particuliers
* Contribuer à la constitution d’un groupe de chercheur.se.s intéressé.e.s par le potentiel de ces approches en archéologie et en histoire
* Encourager le dialogue interdisciplinaire et la recherche collective dans le domaine des réseaux complexes
* Faire vivre les débats sur l’application des théories et méthodes sur les réseaux, en histoire, archéologie, et en retour dans d’autres disciplines.
Lire l'appel à comunications complet en versions
anglaise et française.

La journée de Paris se tiendra dans la foulée du congrès d’archéologie CAA,
afin de permettre à ses participants d’être présents s’ils le souhaitent ; mais
les propositions pour la journée émanant d’autres disciplines et notamment de
l’histoire sont tout à fait bienvenues, indépendamment de toute participation
au congrès CAA.

Les présentations orales seront limitées à 15 minutes, de
manière à laisser un temps important aux discussions. La plupart des
communications orales seront présentées en anglais, mais certaines seront en
français avec des résumés et supports visuels en anglais. Il sera possible
d’intervenir en français dans les discussions. Des posters seront également affichés
et, en plus des discussions auxquelles ils pourront donner lieu pendant les
pauses, une session sera dédiée à leur présentation orale très rapide (2
minutes) et à une discussion générale à leur sujet.
Il n’y a pas de frais
d’inscription, mais, du fait de la taille des amphithéâtres, il est nécessaire
de s’inscrire au préalable (en cas d’inscriptions trop nombreuses, seuls les
premiers pourront entrer !).
Notez enfin deux autres
événements connexes auxquels nous vous encourageons également à participer
* Un atelier pratique “The Connected Past” dans le cadre de la CAA : introduction aux réseaux sociaux pour archéologues (en anglais), voir CAA.
* Les 9-11 avril 2014 à Toulouse, les secondes rencontres Res-Histsur l’analyse de réseaux en histoire, avec des invités étrangers, des présentations de recherches en cours et des ateliers pratiques de formation.
Programme
(certains détails d'organisation interne peuvent changer)
Samedi 16 avril
9h-9h45 Accueil, café, introduction
9h45-11h Première session : Réseaux et mobilités
Eivind Heldaas Seland : Tracing trade routes as networks: From Palmyra to
the Persian Gulf in the first three centuries CE
Henrik Gerding et Per Östborn : Network analyses of the diffusion of
Hellenistic fired bricks
Marie Lezowski : Cohesion through mobility : the networks of relics in
17th-century Lombardy
11h-11h15 Pause café
11h15-12h30 Deuxième session : Dynamique des réseaux et comparaisons entre
périodes
Habiba, Jan C. Athenstädt et Ulrik Brandes : Inferring Social Dynamics from
Spatio-Temporal Network Data in the US Southwest
Ana Sofia Ribeiro : Resilience in times of Early Modern financial crises: the
case study of Simon Ruiz network, 1553-1606
Marion Beetschen : Social Network Analysis as a Complementary Methodological
Tool in History
12h30-13h45 Pause déjeuner
13h45-15h Troisième session : Echanges inter-culturels
Angus A. A. Mol etFloris W. M. Keehnen : Tying up Columbus: A historical
and material culture study of the networks that resulted from the first
European voyages into the Caribbean (AD 1492-1504)
Francisco Apellaniz : Cooperating in Complex Environments: Cross-cultural
Trade, Commercial Networks and Notarial Culture in Alexandria (Egypt) :
1350-1500
Florencia Del Castillo etJoan Anton Barceló : Inferring the intensity of Social
Network from radiocarbon dated Bronze Age archaeological contexts
15h-15h15 Pause café
15h-15h50 Quatrième session : Interactions politiques
Stanley Théry : Social network analysis between Tours notables and Louis XI
(1461-1483)
Laurent Beauguitte : Models of historical networks: A methodological proposal
15h50-16h45 Dernière session. Courtes présentations orales (2 mn) des
posters, discussions des posters et discussion générale
Posters de :
Zeynep Aktüre : The Ancient Theatre Network in the Mediterranean: A
Structuralist Interpretation Inspired from Fernand Braudel’s Three Planes of
Historical Time
Thibault Clérice et Anthony Glaise : Network analysis and distant reading: The
Cicero’s Network
Damian Koniarek, Renata Madziara et Piotr Szymański : Towards a study of the
structure of the business & science social network of the 2nd Polish
Republic
Susana Marcos : Familial alliances, social links et geographical network. The
example of the province of Lusitania in the Roman Empire (to be confirmed)
Stefania Merlo Perring : The ChartEx Project. Reconstructing spatial
relationships from medieval charters: a collaboration between Data Mining and
Historical Topography
Sébastien Putniak : Archaeology as practical mereology: an attempt to analyze a
set of ceramic refits using network analysis tools
Grégoire van Havre : Interactions and network analysis of a rock art site in
Morro do Chapéu, Bahia, Brazil
Beatrice Zucca Micheletto : Network analysis and gender's studies: some issues
from the Italian case (Turin, 17th-18th centuries)
16h45 Pot de clôture et discussions informelles




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