[Humanist] 27.594 events: mediations of the visual; alt-uses of applications for creative purposes

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Thu Dec 5 10:37:30 CET 2013


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 27, No. 594.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    kcl - cerch <cerch at kcl.ac.uk>                             (13)
        Subject: CeRch Seminar: Détournement of applications as a creative
                tool (lecture/performance)

  [2]   From:    "Prescott, Andrew" <andrew.prescott at kcl.ac.uk>            (28)
        Subject: Cultural Mediations of the Visual


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Wed, 4 Dec 2013 13:14:42 +0000
        From: kcl - cerch <cerch at kcl.ac.uk>
        Subject: CeRch Seminar: Détournement of applications as a creative tool (lecture/performance)


CeRCH Seminar for 10 December:
Détournement of applications as a creative tool (lecture/performance) - 
Brian Reffin Smith, Collège de 'Pataphysique, Paris

Date: Tuesday, 10th December, 2013 from 6:15 PM to 7:30 PM (GMT)
Location: Anatomy Museum Space, 6th Floor, King's College London (Strand campus)
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/campuslife/campuses/strand/Strand.aspx

Attendance is free and open to all, but registration is requested:
https://www.eventbrite.com/event/8348553749
The seminar will be followed by wine and festive nibbles.

All the best,

Valentina Asciutti

Abstract: The French word "Détournement", loosely translatable as hijacking, leading astray or appropriation, describes the sideways or "alt" use of computer applications outside their original fields: for example the use of medical imaging software to make movies, of spelling checkers to scramble text, or of fluid behaviour modelling software to make drawings. It is a two-way process and win-win situation, because "unauthorised" or simply crazy uses of apps can feed back ideas into their mainstream application as well as leading to creative splurges in other disciplines. Examples, some interactive, will be shown of hijacking computer software and iPad apps into areas of art, sound, text, cognitive psychology and because of the venue, anatomy (it is recommended not to eat before this seminar).

Bio: Brian Reffin Smith is a writer, artist, theoretician, zombie and musician. He has spent about 40 years teaching ideas of "détournement", using them for art and writing about them, and is a pioneer of computer based conceptual art. He won the very first Golden Nike (the 'Oscars' of computer art) at Ars Electronica, Linz, Austria and his art and text works are shown internationally. His fields of activity are computer-based art and general creativity, performance art, Zombie studies and 'Pataphysics, the science of imaginary solutions. He is a book reviewer for Leonardo. He was for 25 years a French civil servant, as Professeur, Art et Informatique, in the École Nationale Supérieure d'Art, Bourges, France. He holds the Chair of Catachemistry and Speculative Metallurgy in the Paris-based Collège de 'Pataphysique, and lives in Berlin, Germany.



--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Wed, 4 Dec 2013 13:53:44 +0000
        From: "Prescott, Andrew" <andrew.prescott at kcl.ac.uk>
        Subject: Cultural Mediations of the Visual


Cultural Mediations of the Visual

Location
Council Room K2.29 Strand Campus King's College London
Category
Seminar
When
06/12/2013 (13:00-14:00)
Contact
digitalhumanities at kcl.ac.uk

Cultural Mediations of the Visual: At the nexus of database, narrative and archive.  Hosted by the Department of Digital Humanities.

Associate Professor Hart Cohen,  School of Humanities and Communication Arts,  University of Western Sydney, addresses the re-mediation of archival images as a basis for a form of cultural repatriation, based on his research with the Ntaria communities in Australia. He  is the Chief Investigator of the  Australia Research Council project titled, Digital Archives and Discoverability: Conceptualising the Strehlow collection as a new knowledge resource for remote indigenous communities.

Dr Cohen writes:

From the mid 1990s my research engagements have centred on the Strehlow Collection in the context of its primary community of interest at Hermannsburg(Ntaria), about 130 kilometres west of Alice Springs, Central Australia. Currently, this work is being developed as part of an Australian Research Council project titled, Digital Archives and Discoverability: Conceptualising the Strehlow collection as a new knowledge resource for remote indigenous communities.  Earlier projects focused on the Stehlow Film Archive and his memoir, Journey to Horseshoe Bend.

The ascendency of the visual in anthropology has been marked by a tension surrounding the use of images that have been collected and sequestered in archives. Two tendencies have converged recently: the use of digital technology in the re-mediating of image collections and an interest in the repatriation of material culture by communities of interest from collecting agencies.

Our project has embraced these two tendencies in exploring the idea of digital repatriation as a means of addressing the knowledge interests in respect of a specific Indigenous community. To support the idea of digital repatriation, we have partnered with the Northern Territory Library Service’s Community Stories Database project to collaborate on the establishment of an iteration of this Database at Hermannsburg as a potential digital hub or repository. Second, we have focussed on narrative strategies as a means ofproviding access to the archive with digital storytelling and on-line storyengines in collaboration with the Ntaria School.

This presentation addresses the re-mediation of archival images as a basis for a form of cultural repatriation reconceptualised as an interest in how images of all kinds can become the space where embodied knowledge and community interest in cultural history cross. Our project’s interests can be summarized in three interrelated questions: How will the digitisation of these archives enable us to find the knowledge flows within and across the Strehlow Collection? Can engagement with contemporary Aboriginal knowledge practicesinform the concept of a cultural landscape? Can Aboriginal people discover and create their own relationships to the content of the Strehlow collection within contemporary database models?

*Note: The paper is based on work in collaboration with co-investigators, Dr Juan Francisco Salazar and Dr Rachel Morley of the School of Humanities and Communication Arts, University of Western Sydney as well as other members of the research team including Wendy Cowan (Ntaria School), Mark Inkamala (W.Arrarnta traditional owner), Rex Kantawara (Cultural Advisor, Ntaria School),Adam Mcfie (SRC). 

Hart Cohen is Associate Professor in Media Arts in the School of Humanities & Communication Arts at the University of Western Sydney, Australia. He is Director, Research and Postgraduate Studies for the School. 
Professor Andrew Prescott FRHistS 
Head of Department 
Department of Digital Humanities 
King's College London 
26-29 Drury Lane 
London WC2B 5RL 
@ajprescott 
www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/ddh 
digitalriffs.blogspot.com 
+44 (0)20 7848 2651 





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