[Humanist] 27.591 mass surveillance; Twitter for research

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Wed Dec 4 08:09:52 CET 2013


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 27, No. 591.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    "Prescott, Andrew" <andrew.prescott at kcl.ac.uk>            (53)
        Subject: Re:  27.588 mass surveillance

  [2]   From:    "Clutterbuck, Hanna" <Hanna_Clutterbuck at hms.harvard.edu>   (9)
        Subject: RE:  27.566 Twitter for research?


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Tue, 3 Dec 2013 10:34:16 +0000
        From: "Prescott, Andrew" <andrew.prescott at kcl.ac.uk>
        Subject: Re:  27.588 mass surveillance
        In-Reply-To: <20131203065225.2B1497743 at digitalhumanities.org>


Dear Willard,

Anybody interested in seeking historical parallels to the issues described in Ronald Reuss’s article will find a great deal of interest in a remarkable Ph D thesis by my former colleague at the British Library, Robert Henderson, 'Vladimir Burtsev and the Russian revolutionary emigration: surveillance of foreign political refugees in London, 1891-1905’ (Queen Mary University of London, 2008), available online here: http://qmro.qmul.ac.uk/jspui/handle/123456789/1461. Chapters Three and Four are particularly relevant. They describe how, despite (or perhaps because of) its reputation as (in Trotsky’s words) a ‘sanctuary’ for political exiles, the British Museum gave readers’ tickets to plain clothes policemen from Scotland Yard to enable them to keep an eye on refugees working in the Reading Room. Following the Greenwich Observatory bomb outrage of 1894 (the inspiration for Conrad’s Secret Agent) it was found that information on the explosives had been taken from a book in the British Museum, and the Museum’s authorities agreed to remove a second edition of the book on explosives from the catalogue and keep it in a reserved collection. (Apparently the origins of the collection of books suppressed on security or legal grounds which was still in place when I worked at the Library, when copies of ’Spycatcher’ received under legal deposit were placed in a Deputy Keeper’s cupboard under lock and key). This eventually led to the arrest of the writer and journalist Vladimir Burtsev by one of the plain clothes policemen with a reader's  ticket as he left the Museum Reading Room. Burtsev was subsequently the first Russian exile to be imprisoned in Britain. The case of Regina v. Bourtzeff remains central to law in this area and was recently cited, as Robert points out,  in the litigation concerning the deportation of Abu Al Hamza.

Andrew
 
Professor Andrew Prescott FRHistS 
Head of Department 
Department of Digital Humanities 
King's College London 
26-29 Drury Lane 
London WC2B 5RL 
@ajprescott 
www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/ddh 
digitalriffs.blogspot.com 
+44 (0)20 7848 2651 

On 3 Dec 2013, at 06:52, Humanist Discussion Group <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk> wrote:

>                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 27, No. 588.
>            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
>                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
>                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
> 
> 
> 
>        Date: Mon, 2 Dec 2013 16:39:30 +0100 (CET)
>        From: "Victoria HF Scott" <vhfscott at gmx.de>
>        Subject: Mass Surveillance, Academic Libraries, and Data Protection
> 
> 
> Hello!
> 
> A friend and I recently translated a German article by Roland Reuss about the
> significance of the NSA revelations for academic libraries, students, and
> scholars. It details how Google has transformed academic library catalogues
> into machines for mass surveillance. The article is specifically about what is
> happening in Germany, but it is an international phenomenon that is, in my
> opinion, beyond disturbing. There has been some discussion about libraries and
> the NSA in the US, but not *academic* libraries and the NSA. I am hoping the
> translation might change that.
> 
> The original German article can be consulted here:
> http://www.faz.net/aktuell/feuilleton/buecher/themen/datenschutz-in-
> bibliotheken-sie-nennen-es-service-dabei-ist-es-torheit-12659003.html 
> 
> The English translation is attached.
> 
> Please feel free to circulate widely.
> 
> All my best,
> Victoria H.F. Scott
> The_Art_History_Guild
> 
> *** Attachments:
>    http://www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist/Attachments/1385998922_2013-12-02_humanist-owner@lists.digitalhumanities.org_29850.2.pdf




--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Tue, 3 Dec 2013 08:54:51 -0500
        From: "Clutterbuck, Hanna" <Hanna_Clutterbuck at hms.harvard.edu>
        Subject: RE:  27.566 Twitter for research?
        In-Reply-To: <20131128060952.2A35376FD at digitalhumanities.org>


Good morning!

Dr. Priego, someone may have pointed this out before but the survey will not allow you to submit a completed entry; it insists that the 'country' field has no text in it.

Thanks!
-Hanna

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Processing Assistant, Center for the History of Medicine and
Project Coordinator, Medical Heritage Library  (http://www.medicalheritage.org/)
617-432-7393
 Hanna_Clutterbuck at hms.harvard.edu





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