[Humanist] 26.437 out into the world to try its fortunes

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Wed Oct 31 07:28:03 CET 2012


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 26, No. 437.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org



        Date: Mon, 29 Oct 2012 07:46:56 -0700 (PDT)
        From: Laval Hunsucker <amoinsde at yahoo.com>
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 26.422 out into the world to try their fortune
        In-Reply-To: <20121026054431.DF5602DC0 at digitalhumanities.org>

> that the folkloric sending out to try its fortune among the people
> who may chance to read it expresses a far more reasonable act, much
> more likely to fit what happens, than our seeking after accursed
> Impact;
> [ . . . ]
> Comments?

Willard,

Apparently you here mean not genuine impact ( effect, result,
influence ) -- even of the sort of which those in the "performance
measurement" world speak -- but rather what is pervertedly and
pretentiously and flat-out incorrectly and misleadingly termed
"impact", all too often, in so-called bibliometric/scientometric
circles and by those sheepish habitués who have been infected
by such charlatanism.

In which case, who could really disagree with you ?

- Laval Hunsucker
  Antwerpen, België

----- Original Message -----
> From: Humanist Discussion Group <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
> To: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
> Cc:
> Sent: Friday, October 26, 2012 7:44 AM
> Subject: [Humanist] 26.422 out into the world to try their fortune
>
>
>                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 26, No. 422.
>             Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
>                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
>                 Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
>
>
>
>         Date: Thu, 25 Oct 2012 10:54:52 +0100
>         From: Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
>         Subject: a different way of thinking
>
>
> Thomas Fuller, M.D., begins his preface "To the Reader", in
> Gnomologia:
> Adagies and Proverbs; Wise Sentences, and Witty Sayings, Ancient and
> Modern, Foreign and British (1732), by imagining, as a parent would of a
> child, the future of his work:
>
>> All of us forget more than we remember, and therefore it hath been my
>> constant Custom to note down and record whatever I thought of my
>> self, or receiv'd from Men, or Books worth preserving.... And having
>> at length collected more than ever any Englishman has before me, I
>> have ventur'd to send them forth, to try their Fortune among the
>> People....
>>
>> All that I take upon me here to do, is only to throw together a vast
>> confus'd heap of unsorted Things, old and new, which you may pick
>> over and make use of, according to your Judgment and Pleasure....
>>
>> I use the alphabetical Order of the initial Words, not as any help to
>> the Reader, but to my self, that I might the better avoid
>> Repetitions, which otherwise would be extreamly difficult to do, in
>> the writing out of so many thousand Sentences, at different times.
>
> The following strikes me:
>
> 1. that the folkloric sending out to try its fortune among the people
> who may chance to read it expresses a far more reasonable act, much more
> likely to fit what happens, than our seeking after accursed Impact;
>
> 2. that the unsorted mass in preference to any sorting he might have
> done differs interestingly though by not all that much from what we do
> (I use an OCR'd pdf, but digitizing this we might attempt to fit
> multiple classifications, perhaps expressing scholarly "added value");
>
> 3. that the loss of enforced serendipity is not an inconsiderable loss.
>
> Comments? If you're charmed by Fuller's Gnomologia, it may be found in
> the Internet Archive, with a pdf from Google Books.
>
> Yours,
> WM
> --
> Willard McCarty, FRAI / Professor of Humanities Computing & Director of
> the Doctoral Programme, Department of Digital Humanities, King's College
> London; Professor, School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics,
> University of Western Sydney; Editor, Interdisciplinary Science Reviews
> (www.isr-journal.org); Editor, Humanist
> (www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist/); www.mccarty.org.uk/




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