[Humanist] 26.414 things to be read

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Wed Oct 24 07:34:43 CEST 2012


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 26, No. 414.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>          (13)
        Subject: open access

  [2]   From:    Andrew Prescott <andrew.prescott at kcl.ac.uk>               (80)
        Subject: New Arcadia funded report on Measuring the Impactof Digital
                Resources

  [3]   From:    Claire Clivaz <claire.clivaz at unil.ch>                      (6)
        Subject: Ebook Reading Tomorrow


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Tue, 23 Oct 2012 12:18:23 +0100
        From: Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
        Subject: open access

Many here will enjoy reading Adeline Koh's "Open Access Ahoy: An 
Interview with Ubiquity Press", ProfHacker, The Chronicle of Higher 
Education, 23 October 2012, 
http://chronicle.com/blogs/profhacker/ubiquity/43312?cid=wc&utm_source=wc&utm_medium=en.

Yours,
WM
-- 
Willard McCarty, FRAI / Professor of Humanities Computing & Director of
the Doctoral Programme, Department of Digital Humanities, King's College
London; Professor, School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics,
University of Western Sydney; Editor, Interdisciplinary Science Reviews
(www.isr-journal.org); Editor, Humanist
(www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist/); www.mccarty.org.uk/


--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Tue, 23 Oct 2012 15:36:04 +0100
        From: Andrew Prescott <andrew.prescott at kcl.ac.uk>
        Subject: New Arcadia funded report on Measuring the Impactof Digital Resources
        In-Reply-To: <DF2913EBC56FF04E9FB0331013DAA43F3C799A3690 at KCL-MAIL03.kclad.ds.kcl.ac.uk>


Dear Colleagues,

Measuring the Impact of Digital Resources: The Balanced Value Impact Model

The full report is now available:

http://www.kdcs.kcl.ac.uk/innovation/impact.html

The Balanced Value Impact Model (BVI Model) draws evidence from a wide
range of sources to provide a compelling account of the means of
measuring the impact of digital resources and using evidence to advocate
how change benefits people. The aim is to provide key information and a
strong model for the following primary communities of use: the cultural,
heritage, academic or creative industries.

For the purposes of this Model, the definition of Impact is:

The measurable outcomes arising from the existence of a digital resource
that demonstrate a change in the life or life opportunities of the
community for which the resource is intended.

The outcome of this cross disciplinary research is a new and targeted
model of Impact Assessment for the primary communities of use identified
above. The Balanced Value Impact Model brings together aspects from
disparate Impact Assessment communities into a cohesive and logical
process for Impact Assessment.

The Balanced Value Impact Model is intended to aid the thinking and
decision making of those wishing to engage in Impact Assessment. It also
acts as a guide through the process of Impact Assessment to enable the
core values most appropriate to the assessment to be brought to the fore
and given a balanced consideration when evaluating outcomes. It presumes
that the assessment will be measuring change within an ecosystem for a
digital resource.

Who should use the BVI Model?

The aim of this report is to provide key information and a strong model
for the following primary communities of use:

·Memory institutions and cultural heritage organizations, such as
libraries, museums and archives.

·Funding bodies who wish to promote evidence-based impact assessment of
activities they support.

·Holders and custodians of special collections.

·Managers, project managers and fundraisers who are seeking to justify
further investment in digital resources.

·Academics looking to establish digital projects and digital scholarship
collaborations with collection owners.

·Publishing, media and business sectors which may be considering the
best means to measure the impact of their digital resources and are
looking to collaborate and align with collection owners, with academia
or with memory institutions.

·Impact Assessment practitioners considering an Impact Assessment of a
digital resource.

What can you do with this document?

This document synthesizes information from the whole Impact Assessment
sector and then proposes the Balanced Value Impact Model as a means to
effectively carry out an Impact Assessment relating to the benefits of
digitization and digital resources in general. It seeks to help the
communities identified above to provide a compelling argument for future
work. Thus, you will find in this document information on:

·Where the value and impact can be found in digital resources,

·Who are the beneficiaries gaining from the impact and value,

·How to measure change and impact for digital resources,

·What makes for good indicators of change in people’s lives,

·How to do an Impact Assessment using the Balanced Value Impact Model, and

·How to present a convincing evidence-based argument for digital resources?

Re-use, copy, distribute, divide and repackage this document for your
needs and non-commercial benefit. Please attribute the source/authorship
according to the licence.

Citing the document:

Tanner, S. (2012) Measuring the Impact of Digital Resources: The
Balanced Value Impact Model. King’s College London, October 2012.
Available at: www.kdcs.kcl.ac.uk/innovation/impact.html
 http://www.kdcs.kcl.ac.uk/innovation/impact.html 

Thanks for your attention,

Simon**

*____________________________________________*

*Simon Tanner*

*Department of Digital Humanities
King's College London*
26-29 Drury Lane
London WC2B 5RL

**

*Email*: simon.tanner at kcl.ac.uk
*Web: *www.kcl.ac.uk/ddh/  http://www.kcl.ac.uk/ddh/  and
www.kdcs.kcl.ac.uk  http://www.kdcs.kcl.ac.uk/ **
*Twitter: *@SimonTanner  http://twitter.com/#!/SimonTanner **
*Phone: *+44(0)7887-691716 (direct)   +44(0)20-7848-2861 (Dept Office)
Blog: http://simon-tanner.blogspot.co.uk/



--[3]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Tue, 23 Oct 2012 17:59:24 +0200
        From: Claire Clivaz <claire.clivaz at unil.ch>
        Subject: Ebook Reading Tomorrow
        In-Reply-To: <DF2913EBC56FF04E9FB0331013DAA43F3C799A3690 at KCL-MAIL03.kclad.ds.kcl.ac.uk>

Dear all,

The first Swiss DH collected essays, «Reading Tomorrow / Lire Demain», is now available here as ebook:

http://www.ppur.com/produit/549/9782889141494/Lire%20demain

The full table on contents can be checked on the website. Pages 1-79 can be freely read online. Some contributions are in two languages. The ebook offers 50% of English texts, 50% of French texts.

Main authors: David Bouvier, François Bovon, Claire Clivaz, Mary Ebbott and Leonard Muellner, David Hamidovic, Frédéric Kaplan, Philippe Kaenel, Jean-Yves Mollier, David Parker, Christian Vandendorpe.

For the editorial team: Claire Clivaz, Lausanne (CH)





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