[Humanist] 26.381 alternative publishing & open access

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Mon Oct 15 09:40:39 CEST 2012


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 26, No. 381.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Daniel Allington <daniel.allington at open.ac.uk>            (20)
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 26.377 alternative publishing & open access

  [2]   From:    Toby Burrows <toby.burrows at uwa.edu.au>                     (9)
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 26.371 alternative publishing


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Sun, 14 Oct 2012 21:08:40 +0100
        From: Daniel Allington <daniel.allington at open.ac.uk>
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 26.377 alternative publishing & open access
        In-Reply-To: <20121014082317.0DC342D9E at digitalhumanities.org>

For an early career academic, publishing in the right places is like paying the rent: the penalties of not doing it are absolutely clear. In one case, you end up homeless; in the other, you end up unemployed. It's not about being averse to risk, but about averting disaster.

Unfortunately, many PhD students, postdocs, and teaching fellows don't learn this until too late, because there is a culture of letting them figure it out the hard way. Alexander Hay's message to this list on 6 July gave us all a good - although rather sad - example of that. But I'm sure that many of us could give others. Speaking for myself, I'd be embarrassed to admit how long it took me to work out that chapters in edited collections don't count for anything! (The realisation didn't stop me writing them - but when I do so now, it is with the knowledge that they are something in the vicinity of a luxury.)

I'm willing to admit, though, that my comments relate to a UK context. US academic employment practices are probably that much more enlightened.

Best wishes

Daniel

> 
> --[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
>        Date: Sat, 13 Oct 2012 14:04:35 -0700
>        From: virginia kuhn <vkuhn at cinema.usc.edu>
>        Subject: new PhDs are researchers! re:[Humanist] 26.371 alternative publishing+ advice
>        In-Reply-To: <mailman.3.1350122402.10156.humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org>
> 
> 
> While there *is* only one comment on the *THE* story, I disagree that that
> comment shows why open access publishing "can't work" for academics, early
> career or otherwise. Instead I see this comment as both reflecting and
> contributing to the culture of fear and risk-aversion that increasingly
> renders academe irrelevant.


--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 15 Oct 2012 10:34:28 +0800
        From: Toby Burrows <toby.burrows at uwa.edu.au>
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 26.371 alternative publishing
        In-Reply-To: <20121014082317.0DC342D9E at digitalhumanities.org>

Australian researchers should be aware that the current status of "open books" in the annual Higher Education Research Data Collection (HERDC) is problematic. 

The HERDC specifications for 2012 specifically excluded books and book chapters which were "only published electronically". To be eligible, books must have been "offered for sale" and "published by a commercial publisher". See Section 9 of this government document: 
http://www.innovation.gov.au/Research/ResearchBlockGrants/Documents/2012HERDCSpecifications.pdf 

A review of these criteria has been scheduled for 2012. A working group will "examine in detail the appropriate parameters by which research published electronically should be defined and included in future years".

HERDC results are used to calculate Federal Government "block research funding" for universities, hence the importance of their criteria!

Dr Toby Burrows | Manager (eResearch Support) 
The University of Western Australia M209
35 Stirling Highway CRAWLEY WA 6009
toby.burrows at uwa.edu.au





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