[Humanist] 26.469 events: literature & science; biological research

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Fri Nov 9 07:24:29 CET 2012


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 26, No. 469.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>          (27)
        Subject: cfp: British Society for Literature and Science Conference
                2013

  [2]   From:    Chiara Ambrosio <c.ambrosio at UCL.AC.UK>                    (58)
        Subject: STS Seminar Series 2012-13


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Thu, 08 Nov 2012 21:35:18 +0000
        From: Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
        Subject: cfp: British Society for Literature and Science Conference 2013

British Society for Literature and Science Conference 2013

Call for Papers
Cardiff University and the University of Glamorgan

The British Society for Literature and Science invites proposals for 
papers and panels to be delivered at its eighth annual conference to be 
held in Cardiff, 11-13 April 2013. The BSLS Conference does not have a 
theme (as it its usual practise) but especially welcomes proposals on 
the state of the field of literature and science as well as its relation 
too ther fields. This year we would be particularly interested to 
receive proposals that reflectupon the interdisciplinary study of 
literature and science in the context of the debate about the present 
position of the humanities in academia. However, the Society remains 
committed to supporting proposals on all aspects of literature and 
science across all periods. Proposals for papers of 15-20 minutes should 
be sent in the body of the email text (no attachments, please), to 
bsls2013 at yahoo.co.uk, with the subject line ‘BSLS 2013abstract’.

Submissions should include the title of the paper, an abstract of no 
more than 300 words, a maximum of 3 keywords (placed at the end of the 
abstract), and the name and contact details of the speaker.

-- 
Willard McCarty, FRAI / Professor of Humanities Computing & Director of
the Doctoral Programme, Department of Digital Humanities, King's College
London; Professor, School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics,
University of Western Sydney; Editor, Interdisciplinary Science Reviews
(www.isr-journal.org); Editor, Humanist
(www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist/); www.mccarty.org.uk/


--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Thu, 8 Nov 2012 22:52:33 +0000
        From: Chiara Ambrosio <c.ambrosio at UCL.AC.UK>
        Subject: STS Seminar Series 2012-13

STS Seminar Series 2012-13
Department of Science and Technology Studies
University College London

The series is free and open to the public

Monday 12 November, 4.15 pm
Sabina Leonelli , Centre for Genomics and Society (Egenis), Exeter
"Life in the Digital Age: The Impact of Open Data and Data-Sharing
Technologies on Biological Research"

Venue: Roberts Building, room 106
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/estates/roombooking/building-location/?id=045

The seminar will be followed by a reception at the Grant Museum of 
Zoology and Comparative Anatomy

Abstract:
The so-called ‘data deluge’, caused by the overwhelming quantity of 
information available to scientists through new technologies for the 
production, storage and dissemination of data, keeps making headlines. 
Online databases and data mining tools are gaining authority as the best 
ways not only to disseminate data, but also to understand their 
scientific significance – in other words, to transform data into 
knowledge. Perhaps unsurprisingly, Microsoft researchers have taken the 
lead in dubbing data-intensive approaches as a brand new paradigm in the 
history of science. Equally unsurprising is the position of scholars in 
the history, philosophy and social studies of science, who are taking a 
more cautious stand on both the novelty and the revolutionary potential 
of these developments. This talk examines some implications of this 
shift in research practices within the biological and biomedical 
sciences. Are we witnessing the rise of a new scientific epistemology, 
centred upon data-intensive research methods? And what opportunities and 
dangers are associated to it? This talk will consider these questions 
from a philosophical perspective informed by empirical studies of data 
curation in model organism biology and plant science, as well as 
involvement in policy discussions of Open Science and ‘intelligent’ data 
dissemination.

Forthcoming Seminars:

Monday 26 November, 4.15 pm
Helen Curry, HPS, Cambridge
"Atoms in agriculture: nuclear science as agricultural outreach in the
United States, 1945-1960"
Venue: Room 105, 24 Gordon Square
Building Location:
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/estates/roombooking/building-location/?id=026

Monday 10 December, 4.15 pm
Jack Stilgoe, STS, UCL
"Governing intent: Experiments in responsible geoengineering"
Venue: Room 105, 24 Gordon Square
Building Location:
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/estates/roombooking/building-location/?id=026

--
Dr. Chiara Ambrosio
Lecturer in History and Philosophy of Science
Department of Science and Technology Studies
University College London
Gower Street
London WC1E 6BT

Phone: +44 02076790166
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/sts/staff/ambrosio
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/sts
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/basc





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