[Humanist] 26.456 when amplification makes new; usefulness of mapping interface

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Tue Nov 6 07:41:30 CET 2012


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 26, No. 456.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    John Laudun <jlaudun at me.com>                              (61)
        Subject: Re:  26.454 when does amplification make new?

  [2]   From:    Malte Rehbein <malte.rehbein at unl.edu>                     (99)
        Subject: Re:  26.425 report on interactive mapping interface


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 05 Nov 2012 08:48:37 -0600
        From: John Laudun <jlaudun at me.com>
        Subject: Re:  26.454 when does amplification make new?


Doesn't this inquiry connect back to previous threads about the location of "ability" or "knowledge" when using tools? Certainly, if one follows the work of cognitive anthropologists like Charles Frake and Edwin Hutchins, who argue that in cognition is embedded (often) in a larger process which includes materiel outside the human body, then the skilled operator does indeed possess the ability. That's Frake notion, to some degree, when discussing the Medieval sailor's use of the compass rose and also Hutchins' notion when exploring the expanded socio-technological landscape of modern ship navigation, a landscape he ultimately describes as "distributed cognition."

john laudun

--
John Laudun
Department of English
University of Louisiana – Lafayette
Lafayette, LA 70504-4691
337-482-5493
laudun at louisiana.edu
http://johnlaudun.org/

On Nov 5, 2012, at 12:27 AM, Humanist Discussion Group <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk> wrote:

> 
>                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 26, No. 454.
>            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
>                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
>                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
> 
> 
> 
>        Date: Sun, 04 Nov 2012 20:55:14 +0000
>        From: Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
>        Subject: when amplification makes something new
> 
> In George R Stibitz and Jules A Larrivee, Mathematics and Computers 
> (1957), the authors mention "a notion advanced by Warren Weaver that an 
> increase in any ability by a factor of 10 or 100 is in effect a new 
> *kind* of ability" (vi). Does anyone know where in print Weaver wrote 
> that? And what do you make of such an assertion?
> 
> With regards to intelligence I have certainly met people in another league 
> altogether -- e.g. when a teenager a fellow about my age who was in
> mathematical ability (and, as far as I could tell, only in that respect) 
> simply a different kind of creature. Olympic athletes suggest the same --
> as one colleague said (she is prone to exaggeration) "like gods". In 
> evolutionary terms we use a Linnaean scheme that distinguishes one 
> kind from another by physiological criteria. Darwin advised that attempts 
> to distinguish humans from animals systematically were by their 
> number and differences shown to be in vain. Whatever Weaver intended,
> Stibitz and Larrivee were suggesting that having the computer (as it
> was then) meant having an ability. If I say that with this computer I am
> now using, for example, I *have* thus and such an ability, in what sense
> do I *have* it?
> 
> Comments?
> 
> Yours,
> WM
> -- 
> Willard McCarty, FRAI / Professor of Humanities Computing & Director of
> the Doctoral Programme, Department of Digital Humanities, King's College
> London; Professor, School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics,
> University of Western Sydney; Editor, Interdisciplinary Science Reviews
> (www.isr-journal.org); Editor, Humanist
> (www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist/); www.mccarty.org.uk/


--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 5 Nov 2012 13:01:28 -0600
        From: Malte Rehbein <malte.rehbein at unl.edu>
        Subject: Re:  26.425 report on interactive mapping interface
        In-Reply-To: <20121026054748.BFB182DEF at digitalhumanities.org>

Können wir davon etwas gebrauchen? Turned uns das an? :-)

On 26.10.2012 00:47, Humanist Discussion Group wrote:
>                   Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 26, No. 425.
>              Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
>                         www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
>                  Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
>
>
>
>          Date: Thu, 25 Oct 2012 10:33:03 +0200
>          From: Loet Leydesdorff <loet at LEYDESDORFF.NET>
>          Subject: interactive mapping of patents; both geographically and in terms of patent classificaitons
>
>
> Interactive Overlay Maps for US Patent (USPTO) Data
>   http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.6456
> based on International Patent Classifications (IPC)
>
> We report on the development of an interface <at
> http://www.leydesdorff.net/ipcmaps> to the US Patent and Trademark Office
> (USPTO) that allows for the mapping of patent portfolios as overlays to
> basemaps constructed from citation relations among all patents contained in
> this database during the period 1976-2011. Both the interface and the data
> are in the public domain; the freeware program VOSViewer can be used for the
> visualization.
>
> These basemaps and overlays can be generated at both the 3-digit and 4-digit
> levels of the International Patent Classifications (IPC) of the World
> Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO). The basemaps provide a stable
> mental framework for analysts to follow developments over searches for
> different years, which can be animated. The full flexibility of the advanced
> search engine of USPTO is available for generating sets of patents which can
> thus be visualized and compared. This instrument allows for addressing
> questions about technological distance, diversity in portfolios, and
> animating the developments of both technologies and technological capacities
> of organizations over time.
>
> Loet Leydesdorff, (a)
> Duncan Kushnir, (b) &
> Ismael Rafolsc, (d)
>
>    _____
>
> Mapping (USPTO) Patent Data using Overlays to Google Maps
>   http://arxiv.org/abs/1110.5712
> [JASIST 63(7) (2012) 1442-1458]
>
> A technique is developed using patent information available online (at the
> US Patent and Trademark Office) for the generation of Google Maps. The
> overlays indicate both the quantity and quality of patents at the city
> level. This information is relevant for research questions in technology
> analysis, innovation studies and evolutionary economics, as well as economic
> geography. The resulting maps can also be relevant for technological
> innovation policies and R&D management, because the US market can be
> considered the leading market for patenting and patent competition. In
> addition to the maps, the routines provide quantitative data about the
> patents for statistical analysis. The cities on the map are colored
> according to the results of significance tests. The overlays are explored
> for the Netherlands as a "national system of innovations," and further
> elaborated in two cases of emerging technologies: "RNA interference" and
> "nanotechnology." The routines are available (as freeware) at
> http://www.leydesdorff.net/patentmaps .
>
> Loet Leydesdorff & Lutz Bornmann (e)
>
> a Amsterdam School of Communication Research (ASCoR), University of
> Amsterdam, Kloveniersburgwal 48, 1012 CX Amsterdam, The Netherlands;
> loet at leydesdorff.net; http://www.leydesdorff.net; * corresponding author.
>
> b Environmental Systems Analysis, Chalmers University of Technology,
> Göteborg, Sweden; duncan.kushnir at chalmers.se.
>
> c SPRU (Science and Technology Policy Research), University of Sussex,
> Freeman Centre, Falmer Brighton, East Sussex BN1 9QE, United Kingdom;
> i.rafols at sussex.ac.uk.
>
> d Ingenio (CSIC-UPV), Universitat Politècnica de València, València, Spain.
>
> e Division for Science and Innovation Studies, Administrative Headquarters
> of the Max Planck Society, Hofgartenstr. 8, D-80539 Munich, Germany;
> bornmann at gv.mpg.de


-- 
Dr. Malte Rehbein
Assistant Professor of History
Faculty Fellow, Center for Digital Research in the Humanities
University of Nebraska
624 Oldfather Hall
Lincoln, NE 68588





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