[Humanist] 25.932 events: Leipzig eHumanities Seminar; lecture

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Wed May 2 07:26:42 CEST 2012


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 25, No. 932.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Marco Büchler <mbuechler at e-humanities.net>               (21)
        Subject: The 2012 Leipzig eHumanities Seminar

  [2]   From:    Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>          (32)
        Subject: Harold Short at Virginia


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Tue, 01 May 2012 10:26:38 +0200
        From: Marco Büchler <mbuechler at e-humanities.net>
        Subject: The 2012 Leipzig eHumanities Seminar

The Leipzig eHumanities Seminar establishes a new forum for the 
discussion of digital methods applied within the Humanities. Topics 
include text mining, machine learning, network analysis, time series, 
sentiment analysis, agent-based modelling, or efficient visualization of 
massive and humanities relevant data.

The seminars take place every Wednesday afternoon (16:30 - 19:00)from 
October to Novemberat the Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science in 
Leipzig, Germany. All accepted papers will be published in a printed 
volume. Furthermore, a small budget for travel cost reimbursements is 
available.

Abstracts of no more than 1000 words should be sent by June, 15th, 
2012to seminar at e-humanities.net. Notifications and program announcements 
will be sent by the end of July.

If you have any questions please contact at seminar at e-humanities.net.

Seminar board (in alphabetical order):
Marco Büchler (Natural Language Processing),
Elisabeth Burr (Digital Romance Linguistics),
Gregory Crane (Digital Classics, Digital Libraries),
Gerhard Heyer (Natural Language Processing,
Gerik Scheuermann (Visualisation),
Ulrich Johannes Schneider (Cultural Studies, University Library).



--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Tue, 01 May 2012 17:50:05 +0100
        From: Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
        Subject: Harold Short at Virginia

Ælfwine and Montaigne’s Cat: New engagements with person, place and event

Professor Harold Short, Department of Digital Humanities, King's College 
London;
Monday, May 14, 5:00-6:00 pm, with reception to follow, in the Harrison 
Small Institute, Auditorium, University of Virginia

Network analysis, big data, linked data, ontologies, visualization, 
mapping, social media, crowd-sourcing… These and related phenomena are a 
far cry from the scholar patiently and carefully sifting through 
fragmented source materials looking for scraps of evidence that might 
fill out the details known about someone or link him (usually male) to 
another person so as to shed light on his life and career and those of 
his associates – which might have been a reasonably typical description 
of the ‘traditional’ prosopographer.

In those pre-digital times, the methods of prosopography (often termed 
‘collective biography’) were quite distinct from those of biography, 
focused as it was on the single individual, and of ‘humanities’ from 
‘social science’ prosopography, the differences here relating often to 
spread and consistency of the source data.

The digital revolution, however, has been changing–often quite 
radically–the way such research is done, and as in many other areas of 
enquiry is rapidly breaking down barriers between disciplines that once 
seemed fixed for all time.

This paper sets out to review and reflect on the changes in method that 
have already occurred and are continuing apace in the study of persons, 
of their relationships to each other and to place, and of the events 
that encompass their individual and collective lives, along with the 
challenges and opportunities that the new and emerging landscape presents.

-- 
Professor Willard McCarty, Department of Digital Humanities, King's
College London; Professor (fractional), University of Western Sydney;
Editor, Interdisciplinary Science Reviews (www.isr-journal.org); Editor,
Humanist (www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist/); www.mccarty.org.uk/





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