[Humanist] 25.829 recursive-reflective? iPad for teaching?

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Tue Mar 20 07:40:16 CET 2012


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 25, No. 829.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    maurizio lana <maurizio.lana at gmail.com>                   (21)
        Subject: use of iPad for teching?

  [2]   From:    Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>          (17)
        Subject: recursive-reflective


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 19 Mar 2012 18:35:25 +0100
        From: maurizio lana <maurizio.lana at gmail.com>
        Subject: use of iPad for teching?

dear all,
could anyone point me to reports about the use of iPad's in teaching 
courses?
and/or about innovative didactic ebook products for iPad ? in the sense 
that many innovative 'books' exist, speaking of interface; but do they 
produce measurable/evident advantages for students?
many thanks
maurizio

-- 
But just one question still remains
To which we must respond
Two roads lead from where we are,
Which side are you on?
(Arlo Guthrie, Which side, 1979)
-------
il mio corso di informatica umanistica:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=85JsyJw2zuw
-------
Maurizio Lana - ricercatore
Università del Piemonte Orientale, Dipartimento di Studi Umanistici
via Manzoni 8, 13100 Vercelli - tel. +39 347 7370925



--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 19 Mar 2012 22:16:54 +0000
        From: Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
        Subject: recursive-reflective

I am looking for a word, preferably not my clumsy 
"recursive-reflective", to denote an ongoing, repetitive process between 
inventor and invention. The idea to be communicated is that the 
invention in some non-trivial sense mirrors the inventor, and the 
inventor seeing this self-image reflected back adopts it as his or her 
identity, then having changed changes the invention, and so on and so 
forth. Feedback and feed-forward (I. A. Richards' contribution) don't 
really do it, because the cybernetic process, as I understand it, aims 
at homeostasis, whereas I want to denote ongoing metamorphosis.

Any ideas?

Yours,
WM
-- 
Professor Willard McCarty, Department of Digital Humanities, King's
College London; Professor (fractional), University of Western Sydney;
Editor, Interdisciplinary Science Reviews (www.isr-journal.org); Editor,
Humanist (www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist/); www.mccarty.org.uk/





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