[Humanist] 25.813 events: decoding; archaeology & ancient places; digital humanities

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Tue Mar 13 07:52:46 CET 2012


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 25, No. 813.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Michael Pidd <m.pidd at sheffield.ac.uk>                     (26)
        Subject: Digital Humanities Congress 2012 - Call for Papers

  [2]   From:    "Stewart, Deb" <BrownD at DOAKS.ORG>                         (21)
        Subject: CFP: Managing Archaeological Data in the Digital Age

  [3]   From:    Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>          (55)
        Subject: London Seminar in Digital Text and Scholarship

  [4]   From:    Richard Lewis <richard.lewis at gold.ac.uk>                  (24)
        Subject: DDH London Meeting 28 March


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 12 Mar 2012 14:33:36 +0000
        From: Michael Pidd <m.pidd at sheffield.ac.uk>
        Subject: Digital Humanities Congress 2012 - Call for Papers



Dear Colleagues,

Apologies for cross-posting.

I'm pleased to announce the Call for Papers for a new bi-annual
conference, hosted by the Humanities Research Institute, which will take
place in Sheffield during September 2012:

http://hridigital.shef.ac.uk/dhc2012

I would be grateful if you could circulate this link and the attached
Call document to other interested colleagues.

With best wishes
Mike

-- 
Michael Pidd
HRI Digital Manager

Humanities Research Institute
University of Sheffield
34 Gell Street
Sheffield
S3 7QY

Tel: 0114 222 6113
Fax: 0114 222 9894
Email: m.pidd at sheffield.ac.uk
Web: http://www.shef.ac.uk/hri

Times Higher Education University of the Year

-----
*** Attachments:
    http://www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist/Attachments/1331562618_2012-03-12_humanist-owner@lists.digitalhumanities.org_105.2.pdf

--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 12 Mar 2012 13:15:09 +0000
        From: "Stewart, Deb" <BrownD at DOAKS.ORG>
        Subject: CFP: Managing Archaeological Data in the Digital Age


> From: "Stewart, Deb" <BrownD at doaks.org<mailto:BrownD at doaks.org>>
> Date: Thu, 8 Mar 2012 20:49:19 +0000
> Subject: CFP: Managing Archaeological Data in the Digital Age

At the last business meetings, the Medieval and Post-Medieval Archaeology of Greece interest group of the Archaeological Institute of America (MAPMAG) and the Forum for Classics, Libraries, and Scholarly Communications group of the American Philological Association (FCSLC) agreed to co-sponsor a colloquium at the 2013 APA/AIA annual meeting, Seattle, January 3-6 on a topic related to the management of archaeological datasets. The proposed colloquium is described below (please note: a fuller abstract for the colloquium as a whole will be prepared based on individual paper proposals). Our goal is to attract archaeologists, IT professionals, librarians, and other members of the AIA/APA community as presenters and as audience members with the hope that shared experiences and shared knowledge can benefit current and future projects.

We need to submit the colloquium abstract and information on the individual papers by March 25th. If you have a suitable paper or idea, please send Deb (BrownD at doaks.org<mailto:BrownD at doaks.org> or deb1130 at gmail.com<mailto:deb1130 at gmail.com>) your contact information, paper title, the approximate length of time for your presentation, and an abstract (no more than 400 words and further instructions below) by March 20th.

Please feel free to forward this notice to anyone who might be interested. Sorry for the late notice!
Deborah Brown, Dumbarton Oaks, BrownD at doaks.org<mailto:BrownD at doaks.org>
Lucie Wall Stylianopoulos, University of Virginia, lws4n at virginia.edu<mailto:lws4n at virginia.edu>

Managing Archaeological Data in the Digital Age: Best Practices and Realities: CALL FOR PAPERS

In recent decades, archaeological projects have been inundated with digital data - spreadsheets, databases, GIS data, CAD files, digital images, and the like. Not only is it hard to stay informed about the latest technologies, it is also a challenge to design strategies for the collection, storage, and sharing of copious and complex digital data. This colloquium aims to bring together archaeologists and information professionals to share experiences, discuss best practices, and offer workable solutions for the benefit of current and future projects.

We invite papers that address the following topics:

*                 What technologies are projects using in the field, in the dig-house, and at home? What has worked and what hasn't worked?

*                 How can projects take advantage of the Web for collaborative research? For public outreach?

*                 How do projects curate digital data in the long-term?
*             Why do we need metadata standards for data from archaeological projects?  How can archaeologists contribute to these discussions?
*             Where can projects find support and funding to help with technologies and with data management?
Especially welcome are papers that discuss these issues based on the experiences of specific projects (excavations, surveys, an individual's research project, institutional archives).

Guidelines for abstracts:

>From the AIA website:
"The title of a proposed presentation should indicate its specific content in clear terms. The abstract must not exceed 400 words and must conform to the "AIA Style Guidelines for Annual Meeting Abstracts<http://aia.archaeological.org/pdfs/annualconference/AIA_Style_Guidelines.pdf>," available in PDF format in the Annual Meeting section of the AIA website. The research described should be referred to in the present tense rather than in the future tense. (e.g., "I present an analysis of three sealed deposits," rather than, "I will present an analysis of three sealed deposits."). While limited use of in-text citations (in author:year format) is acceptable, bibliographical references and footnotes should not be included and will be removed.

"An abstract for a paper session presentation or a poster presentation should indicate in a clear and succinct fashion the problem addressed in the presentation, the materials and/or data analyzed in relation to this problem, the analytical method employed, the results obtained, and the conclusions reached as a result of this work. As relevant, it should also indicate in a clear fashion the culture, site or region, and time period with which the presentation is concerned."



--[3]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 12 Mar 2012 17:07:17 +0000
        From: Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
        Subject: London Seminar in Digital Text and Scholarship

London Seminar in Digital Text and Scholarship
Thursday, 15 March, 17.30-19.30
Senate House, room 265
tiny.cc/LondonSeminar/
All welcome.

Discovering and using ancient place data
Elton Barker (Open University) and Leif Isaksen (University of Southampton)

Digital resources are fast revolutionising the way that books can be 
mined for data and how information can be usefully displayed. In two 
digital projects, we are bringing together these approaches in the 
discovery of data relating to ancient places and the visualization of 
the results: GAP (Google Ancient Places) aims to find ancient places in 
the Google Books corpus; Pelagios (Pelagios: Enable Linked Ancient 
Geodata In Open Systems) brings together a consortium of projects 
exploring the ancient world in order to link all kinds of data (not 
limited to texts) related to ancient places. In both cases we are 
interested in exploiting the digital medium to display the data that can 
be retrieved. In this paper we outline the background to both projects, 
the approaches that we have taken in order to facilitate the discovery 
of places, and some of the technologies that we have been developing in 
order to visualise and make use of the results. We will be particularly 
concerned to highlight the challenges that we have faced in identifying 
ancient places, to explain the role of the Geoparser, which tags places 
in texts and then resolves them to a gazetteer, and to showcase some of 
the uses to which finding out about ancient places can be put.  Bios: 
Elton Barker is a lecturer in Classical Studies at The Open University. 
He has published widely on ancient Greek literature, and is Principal 
Investigator of three digital classics projects: as well as the 
Google-funded GAP project and JISC-funded Pelagios project, he won an 
Early Career Fellowship with the Arts and Humanities Research Council 
for the HESTIA project, which employs the latest digital technology to 
examine the ways in which Herodotus talks about places in his narrative 
of the war between Greeks and Persians.

Elton Barker is a lecturer in Classical Studies at The Open University. 
He has published widely on ancient Greek literature, and is Principal 
Investigator of three digital classics projects: as well as the 
Google-funded GAP project and JISC-funded Pelagios project, he won an 
Early Career Fellowship with the Arts and Humanities Research Council 
for the HESTIA project, which employs the latest digital technology to 
examine the ways in which Herodotus talks about places in his narrative 
of the war between Greeks and Persians. Leif Isaksen is a Research 
Fellow in Archaeology at the University of Southampton and specialises 
in digital approaches to problems of place and geography in the Ancient 
World. He is Co-Investigator on the Google Ancient Places and Pelagios 
projects and completing a PhD in Computer Science (also at Southampton).

Leif Isaksen is a Research Fellow in Archaeology at the University of 
Southampton and specialises in digital approaches to problems of place 
and geography in the Ancient World. He is Co-Investigator on the Google 
Ancient Places and Pelagios projects and completing a PhD in Computer 
Science (also at Southampton).

-- 
Professor Willard McCarty, Department of Digital Humanities, King's
College London; Professor (fractional), University of Western Sydney;
Editor, Interdisciplinary Science Reviews (www.isr-journal.org); Editor,
Humanist (www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist/); www.mccarty.org.uk/



--[4]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 12 Mar 2012 22:46:07 +0000
        From: Richard Lewis <richard.lewis at gold.ac.uk>
        Subject: DDH London Meeting 28 March


Decoding Digital Humanities (DDH) London will be meeting again on

 * Wednesday 28 March 18:00 *

at The Plough, 27 Museum Street, London, WC1A 1LH
 http://g.co/maps/vftpw 

This month we will be reading:

Carlson, S., and Anderson, B. (2007). What are data? The many kinds of
data and their implications for data re-use. Journal of
Computer-Mediated Communication, 12(2), article 15.
 http://jcmc.indiana.edu/vol12/issue2/carlson.html 

Please feel free to disseminate this announcement, which is
encapsulated in the following page:  http://tinyurl.com/6oukjsj .

We look forward to seeing you in The Plough.

Best wishes,
Richard
-- 
-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
Richard Lewis
ISMS, Computing
Goldsmiths, University of London
Tel: +44 (0)20 7078 5134
Skype: richardjlewis
JID: ironchicken at jabber.earth.li
http://www.richardlewis.me.uk/






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