[Humanist] 26.68 aesthetic computing

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Thu Jun 7 22:08:24 CEST 2012


                  Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 26, No. 68.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org



        Date: Wed, 6 Jun 2012 15:38:38 -0700
        From: Jascha Kessler <urim1 at verizon.net>
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 26.67 aesthetic computing
        In-Reply-To: <20120606210633.D3B4A28243E at woodward.joyent.us>


The only difficulty in this notion is that Æsthetics, as a branch of
philosophy, traditional, is even more vague and ambiguous a realm, and
resistant to [the absolute of] definition that is the Moral branch [pace E.
Kant].

How can it be blithely assumed that more than a [funded(?)] coven may have
a useful clue about the matter?

Jascha Kessler

On Wed, Jun 6, 2012 at 2:06 PM, Humanist Discussion Group <
willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk> wrote:

>                  Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 26, No. 67.
>            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
>                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
>                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
>
>
>
>        Date: Thu, 07 Jun 2012 07:04:20 +1000
>        From: Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
>        Subject: aesthetic computing
>
>
> Some here may know of a movement known as aesthetic computing, begun by
> Paul Fishwick and others at the University of Florida, launched at a
> conference in Dagstuhl, Germany, in July 2002, and now discussed in an
> edited volume, Aesthetic Computing (MIT Press, 2006) as well as in
> numerous other places, including Fishwick's site, "The Content is in the
> Machine", http://www.cise.ufl.edu/~fishwick/aescomputing/. The following
> is quoted from his introduction to the book:
>
> > Aesthetic computing is the application of aesthetics to computing.
> > The goal of aesthetic computing is to affect areas within computing,
> > which for our purposes, will be defined broadly as the area of
> > computer science. With respect to aesthetics, this goal also includes
> > the idea that the application of aesthetics to computing and
> > mathematics, the formal foundations for computing, can extend beyond
> > classic concepts such as symmetry and invariance to encompass the
> > wide range of aesthetic definitions and categories normally
> > associated with making art.
>
> It will come as no surprise to anyone familiar with computing in the
> arts that the journal Leonardo and its executive editor Roger Malina are
> deeply involved.
>
> What seems to me especially significant about this movement for the
> digital humanities is the reversal of the usual tendency to think of
> computing as an external impacting force coming down on the disciplines
> of the humanities to which the disciplines then respond. And this is
> much more than formulating interesting problems for computer scientists
> to solve so that people in the arts can get on with their work. This, it
> seems to me, is a partial realisation of the much overlooked fact that,
> as Michael Mahoney used to insist, Turing's gift is a scheme for the
> devising of indefinitely many computings, limited only by the human
> imagination (which of course has no limits).
>
> So what about the other disciplines with which we are concerned? How
> about a *literary* computing in Fishwick's sense? Or, to bring back a
> discarded term, how about a *humanities* computing?
>
> Comments?
>
> Yours,
> WM
>
> --
> Willard McCarty, FRAI / Professor of Humanities Computing & Director of
> the Doctoral Programme, Department of Digital Humanities, King's College
> London; Professor, School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics,
> University of Western Sydney; Editor, Interdisciplinary Science Reviews
> (www.isr-journal.org); Editor, Humanist
> (www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist/); www.mccarty.org.uk/


-- 
Jascha Kessler
Professor of English & Modern Literature, UCLA
Telephone/Facsimile: 310.393.4648
www.jfkessler.com
www.xlibris.com





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