[Humanist] 26.194 fundamental research questions

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Sat Jul 28 01:51:15 CEST 2012


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 26, No. 194.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    "Totosy de Zepetnek, Steven" <clcweb at purdue.edu>          (24)
        Subject: totosy Re: [Humanist] 26.188 fundamental research questions

  [2]   From:    Richard Lewis <richard.lewis at gold.ac.uk>                  (36)
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 26.172 fundamental research question?


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Thu, 26 Jul 2012 20:21:18 -0400
        From: "Totosy de Zepetnek, Steven" <clcweb at purdue.edu>
        Subject: totosy Re: [Humanist] 26.188 fundamental research questions
        In-Reply-To: <20120726232018.F37F5286713 at woodward.joyent.us>


dear daniel: indeed! however, the fact remains and my colleagues at ghent university have tried everything to no avail to get away from the requirement that humanities scholars have to publish -- to get any credit -- in no other but ISI indexed journals and phd students are reeling under the must of publishing articles in ISI indexed journals to get their phd-s (instead of writing a dissertation!); the sorry state of affairs is such that the situation is getting to be policy in not only belgium but in most other countries in europe, e.g., spain, portugal, all of the nordics, etc.; best, steven totosy

On Jul 26, 2012, at 7:20 pm, Humanist Discussion Group wrote:

>                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 26, No. 188.
>            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
>                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
>                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
> 
> 
> 
>        Date: Thu, 26 Jul 2012 00:12:16 +0100
>        From: Daniel Allington <daniel.allington at open.ac.uk>
>        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 26.185 fundamental research questions
>        In-Reply-To: <20120725221029.60C282869F1 at woodward.joyent.us>
> 
> 
>> 
>> for example in belgium where a humanities dissertation is no book any more but minimum five articles which must be published in thomson reuters ISI indexed journals 
>> 
>> all the best, steven
> 
> Given the Thomson-Reuters bias towards English-language publications, I find that depressing on very many levels.
> 
> Daniel
> 


--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Fri, 27 Jul 2012 15:07:06 +0100
        From: Richard Lewis <richard.lewis at gold.ac.uk>
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 26.172 fundamental research question?
        In-Reply-To: <20120719203426.857EB28575A at woodward.joyent.us>

At Thu, 19 Jul 2012 15:44:44 +0200
Claire Clivaz wrote:

> Digital Humanities are Humanities *made with the fingers*, the Latin
> *digitus*.

That's not really true. "Digital" is just the current popular
adjective prepended to things and practices to make clear that
computing machinery (and sometimes more specific applications thereof
such as, very commonly, the Web) is going to be involved. In the past
this adjective has been "eletronic" and "computational". I expect that
"digital" will eventually become dated and unpopular.

The etyomology of "digital" in this usage is its connotation of number
and counting. Its meaning can, of course, be traced back to fingers
through their application as a counting aid, but that is really a red
herring in "digital humanities".

In computer science, digital also has strong connotations of discrete,
referring to the use of atomic, indivisible numerical values in
computations. It's sometimes considered an antonym of "analogue"
although in fact "continous" would be more appropriate. Analogue
computation really refers to computing machinery in which electrical
circuits are constructed for modelling particular real-world phenomena
(compare this to the universal Turing machine and the stored program
computer); the circuit is an analogue of the phenomena under study. In
digital computers, it's the program that (potentially) functions as a
model.

Richard
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ISMS, Computing
Goldsmiths, University of London
t: +44 (0)20 7078 5134
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