[Humanist] 26.185 fundamental research questions

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Thu Jul 26 00:10:29 CEST 2012


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 26, No. 185.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    "Totosy de Zepetnek, Steven" <clcweb at purdue.edu>          (61)
        Subject: totosy Re: [Humanist] 26.184 fundamental research questions

  [2]   From:    Frédéric Clavert <frederic at clavert.net>                 (32)
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 26.181 fundamental research questions


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 23 Jul 2012 17:18:34 -0400
        From: "Totosy de Zepetnek, Steven" <clcweb at purdue.edu>
        Subject: totosy Re: [Humanist] 26.184 fundamental research questions
        In-Reply-To: <20120723200734.73E44285232 at woodward.joyent.us>


dear claire (if i may): this re your posting today: your designation "les humanites delivrees" with regard to its double meaning re "out of the book" or "delivered outside of the book" or "freed from the book" could also mean what is happening in many countries re dissertations in the humanities and credit and valuation of a book publication: for example in belgium where a humanities dissertation is no book any more but minimum five articles which must be published in thomson reuters ISI indexed journals or in taiwan where an article not published in an ISI indexed journal means nothing, etc.; all this is not necessarily a good thing, methinks, because a book in the humanities is a different animal and long&deep insight necessitates a book; pls don't misunderstand me: i am all in favor of online publishing (in fact, i publish since 1999 one of the very few humanities online journals anywhere that is ISI indexed) but the move away from books -- in the humanities -- is in many ways "dumbing down"… this is of course not the case in the sciences or medicine which is yet another animal

all the best, steven

steven totosy de zepetnek phd professor
http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/clcweblibrary/totosycv
*editor, clcweb: comparative literature and culture
http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/clcweb/ clcweb at purdue.edu
*series editor, purdue books in comparative cultural studies
http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/clcweblibrary/seriespurdueccs &
http://www.thepress.purdue.edu/series/comparative-cultural-studies 
8 sunset road, winchester, massachusetts 01890 usa
totosysteven at purdue.edu 1-781-729-1680
On Jul 23, 2012, at 4:07 pm, Humanist Discussion Group wrote:

>                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 26, No. 184.
>            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
>                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
>                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

>  [2]   From:    Claire Clivaz <Claire.Clivaz at unil.ch>                     (27)
>        Subject: History of authorship and fundamental question in HD
> 
>   
> --[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
>        Date: Sun, 22 Jul 2012 23:07:50 +0200
>        From: Claire Clivaz <Claire.Clivaz at unil.ch>
>        Subject: History of authorship and fundamental question in HD
>        In-Reply-To: <20120722201523.C8BE7284635 at woodward.joyent.us>
> 
> 
> Dear Ashley,
> 
> Of course the question of the authorship is not specific to the DH research,
> but the digital culture provokes an amount of transformations in the
> understanding of that question.
> 
> The first discussions around the digital culture in Lausanne (CH) happened
> in 2009 around the history of authorship. My colleague Jerome Meizoz - who
> worked with Bourdieu in sociology of the French literature - published in
> 2007 his essay on the «literary posture» of the authors. He was
> considering it as efficient only in modernity. In working together, we
> noticed that his theory of the literary postures was efficient already in
> Antiquity (I am a New Testament scholar), and that the digital culture was
> allowing us to consider the history of authorship in its continuities and
> discontinuities. Meizoz explains this shift in his theory in his second
> volume (2011), and he prepares now a meeting on the figures of authorship
> through centuries in Lausanne (20-21 June 2013;
> http://www.unil.ch/fdi/page88711.html#2).
> 
> For all scholars working on «texts» and «writing», the authorship and
> its history is one of the most hot questions in the DH, I think. From the DH
> culture, we are able to reconsider all the previous products of the printed
> «Humanities». With some French speaking colleagues, we have begun to speak
> about «les Humanités délivrées» as a possible title of a future
> meeting. In French, this double sense expression means that Humanities «out
> of the book» (dé-livrées) are «free Humanities», Humanities liberated
> («délivrées»).
> 
> I am more and more convinced that DH allow the Humanities to be delivered,
> out of the cover of the book. Les Humanités délivrées.
> 
> Claire Clivaz
> 
> 



--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Wed, 25 Jul 2012 08:38:19 +0200
        From: Frédéric Clavert <frederic at clavert.net>
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 26.181 fundamental research questions
        In-Reply-To: <20120722201523.C8BE7284635 at woodward.joyent.us>

Dear Humanists,

I tried to answer Claire's interrogation on DH "big" research question on
my blog (http://www.clavert.net/) in French.

To make it short: concerning history, I think that Digital Humanities are
widening even further the big historiographic trend of the XXth century,
which was the extension of the historical domain: from a history dominated
by politics, Historians (for instance with the French Annales school)
extended their research to social history, economic history, climate
history... to everything, in fact, and even to a more clever political
history. The main point here, is that starting from the interwar period,
everything could become a historical subject and everything could become a
historical primary source. Digital Humanities can now help historians to
widen this perspective. In this aspect, Lauren Klein's paper at DH 2012 was
exemplar, as she's using network analysis and visualization to write the
history of the unnamed (ie slaves).

See: Klein, L. F. (2012). Social Network Analysis and Visualization in “The
Papers of Thomas Jefferson.” *Digital Humanities 2012*. Presented at the
Digital Humanities 2012. Retrieved from
http://www.dh2012.uni-hamburg.de/conference/programme/abstracts/social-network-analysis-and-visualization-in-the-papers-of-thomas-jefferson/
.

But there is another question that is important. In some parts of
contemporary history, Digital Humanities are just a question of survival.
If you consider the most recent parts of history, sources from the 1990's
will start to be available in 8 years. So, progressively, starting in 2020,
historians will have to deal with a huge amount of born-digital primary
sources. If historians don't want to become silent, stilfled by their
sources, they have to be prepared. And it is not the case yet.

Best,
Frédéric Clavert

--
Centre Virtuel de la Connaissance sur l'Europe - http://www.cvce.eu/
Digital Humanities Lab (coordinator)





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