[Humanist] 26.158 should I quit

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Sat Jul 14 01:40:25 CEST 2012


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 26, No. 158.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org



        Date: Thu, 12 Jul 2012 17:17:34 -0400
        From: Lew Schwartz <lew1716 at gmail.com>
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 26.155 should I quit
        In-Reply-To: <20120712203800.4143E285E62 at woodward.joyent.us>


Well said and observed.

-Lew Schwartz
On Jul 12, 2012 4:38 PM, "Humanist Discussion Group" <
willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk> wrote:

>                  Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 26, No. 155.
>             Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
>                        www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
>                 Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
>
>
>
>         Date: Thu, 12 Jul 2012 17:15:26 +0200
>         From: "Dr. Hartmut Krech" <kr538 at zfn.uni-bremen.de>
>         Subject: Re: [Humanist] 26.148 should I quit
>         In-Reply-To: <20120711204242.AC0E52848B6 at woodward.joyent.us>
>
>
> Not as a reply or a commentary, but rather as a side note,
> it may perhaps be permitted to quote an anecdote about Guy
> Debord (1931-1994), that early critic of the "global
> theater" (Marshall McLuhan) and founder of the Situationist
> International in 1957 "out of the fusion of two and a half
> existing groups, the Movement for an Imaginist Bauhaus, the
> Lettrist International, and the London Psychogeographical
> Association (the last was represented by its only member,
> Ralph Rumney)":
>
> "Deadlines, delays, and debts. These are the three
> inevitable topics around which Debord's letters circle.
> [...] Late in life he was to say: "I have been a good
> professional — but of what?" While the question was meant to
> be rhetorical, one not entirely implausible answer would be,
> "secretary."
>
> When he wrote the first letter in this volume, Debord had
> [...] drawn around himself the motley collection of drunks,
> drifters, and geniuses known as the Letterist International.
> He had painted its slogan by the banks of the river Seine:
> "Never work!" And had done his best to live up to that
> injunction. He was coming to realize that it implied
> another, and even harder discipline, the unwritten slogan:
> "Make no art!" (McKenzie Wark, in: Guy Debord
> Correspondence. The Foundation of the Situationist
> international (June 1957-August 1960). Los Angeles, CA:
> Semiotext(e), 2009, 5).
>
> Of course, such a view will not pay anybody's bills. But
> what may be meant here, is a very meaningful distinction
> between work as an individual's achievement and work as a
> mere contribution to the "society of the spectacular" to
> uphold the stage scenes among which we move. With the means
> to produce and acquire knowledge having become ubiquitous
> after the digital divide, it is perhaps both possible and
> necesssary to redistribute public recognition of scholarly
> work, at least in the humanities that lack the laboratory
> infrastructure of the natural sciences. Crowd sourcing,
> crowd authoring, crowd curating, crowd revising, etc. are
> intelligent replies to those shifts between the groups of
> "professional" and "amateur" scholars and scientists. But we
> must never forget that even digital humanists are not
> digital at all, but humans with basic needs as to be able to
> live from what they have invested into their skills and
> learning.
>
> Best regards, Hartmut
> http://ww3.de/krech




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