[Humanist] 26.146 publication/launch: musicology; geo-temporal interpretation

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Tue Jul 10 23:04:11 CEST 2012


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 26, No. 146.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    "Nowviskie, Bethany (bpn2f)"                              (12)
                <bpn2f at eservices.virginia.edu>
        Subject: Neatline for geo-temporal interpretation of archival
                collections

  [2]   From:    "J. Stephen Downie" <jdownie at illinois.edu>                (23)
        Subject: Very good computational musicology article in Boston Globe


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Tue, 10 Jul 2012 00:09:50 +0000
        From: "Nowviskie, Bethany (bpn2f)" <bpn2f at eservices.virginia.edu>
        Subject: Neatline for geo-temporal interpretation of archival collections

The Scholars’ Lab is proud to announce the launch of Neatline, a set of Omeka plugins for hand-crafted geo-temporal visualization and interpretation. 

1.0 versions of the software are available at: 

http://neatline.org/ 

-- where you can also see sample exhibits, play in the sandbox, and read more about our project, including news and history. Currently available are Neatline itself, Neatline Maps (an add-on for incorporating georeferenced historical maps and other web services), and stand-alone versions of our Neatline Features and Neatline Time plugins.

Neatline is a geotemporal exhibit-builder that allows you to create beautiful, complex maps and narrative sequences from collections of archives and artifacts in Omeka, and to connect your maps and narratives with timelines that are more-than-usually sensitive to ambiguity and nuance. In other words, Neatline lets you make hand-crafted, interactive stories as interpretive expressions of an archival or cultural heritage collection. This project is more about graphesis and humanities interpretation than about GIS analysis and algorithmic data visualization. Ours is a small-data approach in a big data world.

Stay tuned to the Scholars’ Lab blog (http://scholarslab.org/) and to our news feed at http://neatline.org for a series of posts and screencasts to be shared over the course of the next two weeks. We’ll be providing support for our open-source software on the Omeka forums and dev list -- and presenting the project at DH 2012 in Hamburg.

Neatline has been supported by generous funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the IMLS, and the Library of Congress.  The Scholars' Lab is a department of the University of Virginia Library.

Dr. Bethany Nowviskie
Director, Digital Research & Scholarship, UVA Library
Associate Director, Scholarly Communication Institute
President, Association for Computers & the Humanities
nowviskie.org | scholarslab.org | uvasci.org | ach.org



--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Tue, 10 Jul 2012 13:37:58 -0500
        From: "J. Stephen Downie" <jdownie at illinois.edu>
        Subject: Very good computational musicology article in Boston Globe

Hi colleagues:

I was recently interviewed for a Boston Globe article featuring music 
information retrieval and computational musicology research and 
development. The reporter did an excellent job of surveying a wide range 
of interesting projects. He also did very well at framing the issues and 
potentials of the kind of work we do as digital humanities researchers. 
I recommend it highly.

http://bostonglobe.com/ideas/2012/07/07/when-computers-listen-music-what-they-hear-when-computers-listen-music-what-they-hear/hzdqdfgsIgEPiWPRe66U8J/story.html

Paper version came out as part of the Sunday edition.

Hope to see you all in Hamburg.

Cheers,
Stephen
-- 
**********************************************************
    "Research funding makes the world a better place"
**********************************************************
J. Stephen Downie, PhD
Associate Dean for Research
Professor
Graduate School of Library and Information Science
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
[Vox/Voicemail] (217) 649-3839
NEMA Project Home: http://nema.lis.uiuc.edu





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