[Humanist] 26.129 as head-turning as the Higgs boson? digital bits in a dissertation?

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Thu Jul 5 23:02:17 CEST 2012


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 26, No. 129.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>          (22)
        Subject: a question

  [2]   From:    Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>          (22)
        Subject: digital dissertations


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Thu, 05 Jul 2012 17:27:37 +1000
        From: Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
        Subject: a question

Here's a question for you, but first the background, from NYTimes.com:

> --------------------------------------
>  - TOP NEWS -
> Physicists Find Elusive Particle Seen as Key to
> Universe
> Researchers said they had discovered what looked for all the
> world like the Higgs boson, a long-sought particle that
> could lead to a new understanding of how the universe began.
> http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/05/science/cern-physicists-may-have-discovered-higgs-boson-particle.html?nl=todaysheadlines&emc=tha2_20120705
>

And so the question(s): how is what we do as important, or more 
important, than this? If it isn't, how could it become so? What kind of 
questions would we have to begin asking?

Yours,
WM
-- 
Willard McCarty, FRAI / Professor of Humanities Computing & Director of
the Doctoral Programme, Department of Digital Humanities, King's College
London; Professor, School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics,
University of Western Sydney; Editor, Interdisciplinary Science Reviews
(www.isr-journal.org); Editor, Humanist
(www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist/); www.mccarty.org.uk/



--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Fri, 06 Jul 2012 06:57:19 +1000
        From: Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
        Subject: digital dissertations

For the MA or PhD degree in the humanities, has anyone worked out 
possible relationships between traditional prose submissions and work in 
software with data? Have any dissertations structured in such 
unconventional ways been approved?

Years ago, for an undergraduate degree, I invented a genre I called the 
"essay-report", which combined the formal properties of the traditional 
essay and the scientific laboratory report. One PhD student here has 
arrived more or less at the same format independently. It seems to me 
that if a dissertation is written on the basis of genuinely experimental 
work in the digital humanities its format has to reflect that work. 
Fortunately for us the natural scientists have been at it for quite a 
long time and so have something to contribute here.

Comments?

Yours,
WM
-- 
Willard McCarty, FRAI / Professor of Humanities Computing & Director of
the Doctoral Programme, Department of Digital Humanities, King's College
London; Professor, School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics,
University of Western Sydney; Editor, Interdisciplinary Science Reviews
(www.isr-journal.org); Editor, Humanist
(www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist/); www.mccarty.org.uk/





More information about the Humanist mailing list