[Humanist] 25.506 where the thrill is

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Thu Nov 24 07:29:43 CET 2011


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 25, No. 506.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Todd Lawson <todd.lawson at utoronto.ca>                     (39)
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 25.504 where the thrill is

  [2]   From:    Jascha Kessler <urim1 at verizon.net>                        (13)
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 25.504 where the thrill is


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Wed, 23 Nov 2011 09:33:35 -0500
        From: Todd Lawson <todd.lawson at utoronto.ca>
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 25.504 where the thrill is
        In-Reply-To: <20111123084815.EDCD020969B at woodward.joyent.us>


Can it be that the thrill resides to some degree in the  "sweet unrest"  in which the process is simultaneously instrument and music (as in the case of normal languages)?

Todd Lawson
On 2011-11-23, at 3:48 AM, Humanist Discussion Group wrote:

>                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 25, No. 504.
>            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
>                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
>                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
> 
> 
> 
>        Date: Tue, 22 Nov 2011 09:06:05 +0000
>        From: Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
>        Subject: getting to the thrill
> 
> 
> I take Stephen Woodruff's point, in Humanist 25.500, that hackers love 
> to play with the tools and build things, while end-users just want the 
> thing to work. But what I suppose I was really getting at was in Daniel 
> Alllington's analogy to the musician and instrument. While I don't want 
> to deny the pleasures and achievements of hacking -- far from that, I 
> once was an assembly-language programmer and *loved* twiddling the bits 
> -- I think we're feeling our way toward a third kind of relationship, to 
> use Allington's metaphor: between the instrument maker and the listener 
> is the musician. 
> 
> I think the concept "end-user" seriously inhibits our ability to think beyond 
> the Fordist model of industrial manufacturing, in its deleterious effects no 
> more vividly illustrated than by Charlie Chaplin in Modern Times (1936, 
> also the year of Turing's paper). As I like to ask, what sorts of 
> people do we call "users"? Do we really want to be positioning our 
> audience at the end of a production-line?
> 
> Yours,
> W
> -- 
> Professor Willard McCarty, Department of Digital Humanities, King's 
> College London; Professor (fractional), University of Western Sydney; 
> Editor, Interdisciplinary Science Reviews (www.isr-journal.org); Editor, 
> Humanist (www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist/); www.mccarty.org.uk/



--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Wed, 23 Nov 2011 10:14:19 -0800
        From: Jascha Kessler <urim1 at verizon.net>
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 25.504 where the thrill is
        In-Reply-To: <20111123084815.EDCD020969B at woodward.joyent.us>


And...Willard's "musician" is my car's mechanic.  I dont look under the
hood, except to replenish the water for the windshield wipers.  I DRIVE
that beast, Ford, or post-Ford...and the last ten years have included a
host of disastrous electronic controls to make the car "smarter."  Too
smart by half.  Getting locked out and driven too fast, for instance?

Jascha K



-- 
Jascha Kessler
Professor of English & Modern Literature, UCLA
Telephone/Facsimile: 310.393.4648
www.jfkessler.com
www.xlibris.com





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