[Humanist] 25.499 events: editing; movement

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Mon Nov 21 07:46:52 CET 2011


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 25, No. 499.
            Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Stuart Dunn <stuart.dunn at kcl.ac.uk>                       (50)
        Subject: Loc(i) Motion: Current technologies and computational
                methodologiesfor exploring,human movement in the past and
                present

  [2]   From:    "Stolz, Michael (GERM)" <michael.stolz at germ.unibe.ch>     (22)
        Subject: InterNational and InterDisciplinary Aspects of Scholarly
                Editing (Bern, 15-18 Feb 2012)


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Sun, 20 Nov 2011 10:14:24 +0000
        From: Stuart Dunn <stuart.dunn at kcl.ac.uk>
        Subject: Loc(i) Motion: Current technologies and computational methodologiesfor exploring,human movement in the past and present


Loc(i) Motion: Current technologies and computational methodologies for
exploring human movement in the past and present
http://www.southampton.ac.uk/caa2012/

Session Code: Theory6

Human movement and mobility has always been a challenging topic in the field
of archaeology – involving research both in past and contemporary
settings- due to the static nature of material culture which usually
conditions both its interpretation and reception. In addition, research on
movement features in a variety of discourses pertinent to spatial
perception, wayfinding and embodied experience providing thus, an ideal
ground for interdisciplinary research.

Mobility in past societies can be considered a scalar phenomenon whose study
requires the consideration of diverse temporal and spatial scales. In order
to understand how people travelled and moved during the past, it is
necessary to delve into a series of theoretical and practical issues that
range from the basic variables and factors that affect human movement such
as physiology, perception, and social relationships, to the specific
conditions of the environment in which the studied society lived. In the
past decade, a wide range of computational approaches in different
disciplines has been developed helping us to shed light into a variety of
hypothesis related to human movement.

Similarly, current technological advances in motion capture, tracking
systems and simulation techniques enable the study of human movement and the
experience of moving both in real and virtual spaces; and to extrapolate
from one to the other. This has unlocked a variety of new territories for
research and practice-led work which informs the computer-mediated fields of
heritage such as site and visitor management, fieldwork, serious games in
cultural heritage, museology and visitor experience studies. It also allows
us to (re) consider some of the assumptions that lie behind the capture and
presentation of 3D imagery of archaeological features and environments.

The purpose of this session is to bring together the various technologies
and computational methodologies used by archaeologists and other specialists
that explore past and present human movement. We also welcome papers that
examine potential lines of collaboration on this topic between a diversity
of fields like physiology, psychology, archaeology, heritage management,
design and computer science

--Dr Stuart Dunn
Research Fellow
Centre for e-Research
King's College London

www.stuartdunn.wordpress.com

Tel +44 (0)207 848 2709
Fax +44 (0)207 848 1989
stuart.dunn at kcl.ac.uk

Centre for e-Research
26-29 Drury Lane
London WC2B 5RL
UK

Geohash: http://geohash.org/gcpvj1zm7yp1




--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Sun, 20 Nov 2011 15:06:52 +0000
        From: "Stolz, Michael (GERM)" <michael.stolz at germ.unibe.ch>
        Subject: InterNational and InterDisciplinary Aspects of Scholarly Editing (Bern, 15-18 Feb 2012)
        In-Reply-To: <20111120081554.5A17F2076B3 at woodward.joyent.us>


Dear subscribers,

I am pleased to announce that the Conference on "InterNational and
InterDisciplinary Aspects of Scholarly Editing", jointly organized by the
ESTS and the Arbeitsgemeinschaft für germanistische Edition (University of
Bern, 15.­18. February 2012), is now open for registration.

For the programme, registration and local details such as hotels etc.
please consult the website on:

http://www.parzival.unibe.ch/Bern2012/index.html

The organization committee is looking forward to welcome you in Bern in
February 2012.

With best wishes

Michael Stolz

-- 
Prof. Dr. Michael Stolz
Universitaet Bern
Institut fuer Germanistik
Laenggass-Str. 49
CH-3000 Bern 9

Tel.: +41 31 631 83 04
Fax: +41 31 631 37 88
E-mail: michael.stolz at germ.unibe.ch
URL: http://www.parzival.unibe.ch/stolz/





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