[Humanist] 24.793 GIS projects

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Fri Mar 18 07:26:49 CET 2011


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 24, No. 793.
         Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    "Postles, David A. (Dr.)" <pot at leicester.ac.uk>            (2)
        Subject: RE: [Humanist] 24.788 GIS projects

  [2]   From:    Karl Grossner <karlg at geog.ucsb.edu>                      (243)
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 24.788 GIS projects


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Thu, 17 Mar 2011 14:59:44 +0000
        From: "Postles, David A. (Dr.)" <pot at leicester.ac.uk>
        Subject: RE: [Humanist] 24.788 GIS projects
        In-Reply-To: <20110317073940.314AD11A552 at woodward.joyent.us>

Just a note that there are OpenSource GIS apps so that you do not have to shell out a fortune: GRASS (more complex) or QGIS (Quantum GIS) less complex.

For a brief introduction to QGIS (cross-platform app): http://www.historicalresources.myzen.co.uk


--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Thu, 17 Mar 2011 09:58:15 -0700
        From: Karl Grossner <karlg at geog.ucsb.edu>
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 24.788 GIS projects
        In-Reply-To: <20110317073940.314AD11A552 at woodward.joyent.us>


Greetings -- I've been a regular reader of this list for a few years, and
this question has prompted me to finally wade in. My recently completed
dissertation research (hmm...completed?) concerned semantic and temporal
extensions to typical GIS data models for representing historical knowledge
in the emerging genre of digital historical atlases.

I'll add this link to a recently completed 2-day conference here at UC Santa
Barbara, "Mapping Place: GIS and the Spatial Humanities"
http://www.ihc.ucsb.edu/mappingplace/. It was co-hosted by the
Interdisciplinary Humanities Center and the group I'm in, the Center for
Spatial Studies -- which is the most recent incarnation of a GIScience
research center here, following NCGIA and CSISS. A number of interesting
projects were presented, some on the lists provided by others.

I'll also add the point that what (lower case) geographic information
systems are is fluid. Many in the GIScience community are seeking to extend
functionality and in turn the range of disciplines they may be of use to.
Those who find that sort of software intriguing but weak in some aspects can
weigh in. Certainly, GIS is more than mapping technology, although they 'do'
maps. Needs vary -- thumbtacks and a time slider can very effectively
represent an argument; maps of spatial analytic results are another matter.
For what its worth, analytic results can be displayed in web maps readily
and dynamically, without the exchange of shapefiles!

I look forward to the Virginia Spatial Humanities site as a forum where
these ideas can continue to be be explored!
-Karl
___________________
Karl Grossner, PhD
karlg at geog.ucsb.edu
Center for Spatial Studies
Department of Geography
UC Santa Barbara
http://geog.ucsb.edu/~grossner

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