[Humanist] 24.788 GIS projects

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Thu Mar 17 08:39:40 CET 2011


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 24, No. 788.
         Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Leif Isaksen <leifuss at googlemail.com>                     (81)
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 24.786 GIS projects?

  [2]   From:    "Nowviskie, Bethany (bpn2f)"                              (55)
                <bpn2f at eservices.virginia.edu>
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 24.786 GIS projects?

  [3]   From:    Sara Schmidt <saschmidt8 at gmail.com>                       (59)
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 24.786 GIS projects?


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Wed, 16 Mar 2011 11:00:27 +0000
        From: Leif Isaksen <leifuss at googlemail.com>
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 24.786 GIS projects?
        In-Reply-To: <20110316062051.2A9141178E0 at woodward.joyent.us>

Dear John

I think this may very much depend on your views as to the scope of
Digital Humanities. Within Archaeology GIS is now so prevalent that it
has to some degree become the norm rather than the exception for
excavations. It is slightly less ubiquitous within research projects
due to the technical skills required, but conferences like Computer
Applications in Archaeology are probably about 50% geospatial in
content. On the other hand I'm aware that the 'Digital Humanities' and
'Digital Archaeology' communities don't overlap perhaps as much as
they should (perhaps not?) and GIS isn't so common in the more
text-oriented disciplines.

As an extension to this thought I'd suggest that GIS, while certainly
here to stay, is being superceded to some extent by so-called
'NeoGeography' (i.e. Webmapping) within the Digital Humanities. There
seem to be two reasons for this - the first is that it's generally
easier to pick up than full-blown GIS skills and often provides a
sufficient level of functionality for a DH project. It often also
provides better means of representing (and interacting with) time.
Secondly (and perhaps even more importantly) it is easier to
disseminate, or better put, webmapping is the very act of
dissemination. It has certainly been our experience on the HESTIA
project that content that was immediately available online picked up
more interest than work we did using a GIS, for which we would need to
send, e.g. shapefiles around (or serve them over WMS/WFS, which takes
us back to webmapping).

I'd certainly be interested to know who else is working at the
text-space-place interface though, so if you're setting up a wiki page
(which I'd wholeheartedly support) you might want to kick off with:

HESTIA (http://www.open.ac.uk/Arts/hestia/)
Google Ancient Places (GAP) (http://googleancientplaces.wordpress.com/)
Pelagios (http://pelagios-project.blogspot.com/)

For a digital take on the very first Geographic Information System
(Ptolemy's Geographia), you might also enjoy a paper I've just written
for the forthcoming ICA Digital Approaches to Cartographic Heritage
workshop:
http://leifuss.files.wordpress.com/2011/03/ica-dachisaksen.pdf

Best wishes

Leif

On Wed, Mar 16, 2011 at 6:20 AM, Humanist Discussion Group
<willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk> wrote:
>                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 24, No. 786.
>         Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
>                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
>                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
>
>
>
>        Date: Tue, 15 Mar 2011 19:00:19 +0000
>        From: John Levin <john at anterotesis.com>
>        Subject: Digital Humanities GIS projects
>
> Hi,
>
> I'm hoping the list can help me with a little project that seems obvious
> and useful, but that doesn't seem to exist, namely a list of digital
> humanities projects that use Geographic Information Systems (GIS) or
> similar cartographical technologies.
>
> I'm currently going through my voluminous bookmarks, and have found a
> few, but know that I haven't recorded every one I've seen or heard about.
>
> Is there already such a list in existence? What DH GIS projects do the
> list know of?
>
> TIA
>
> John
> --
> John Levin
> http://www.anterotesis.com
> johnlevin at joindiaspora.com
> http://twitter.com/anterotesis


--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Wed, 16 Mar 2011 09:56:49 -0400
        From: "Nowviskie, Bethany (bpn2f)" <bpn2f at eservices.virginia.edu>
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 24.786 GIS projects?
        In-Reply-To: <20110316062051.2A9141178E0 at woodward.joyent.us>

Dear John (and all),

This is as good a time as any to share the news that, within a few weeks, the Scholars' Lab at the University of Virginia Library will make public a community-driven "Spatial Humanities" website through which we hope to crowd-source listings and recommendations about exemplary digital humanities projects using GIS and spatial technology.

The website is one outcome of an NEH-funded "Institute for Enabling Geospatial Scholarship" held last year at the Scholars' Lab: http://lib.virginia.edu/scholarslab/geospatial/

The Spatial Humanities site will feature project lists and a growing research bibliography to which end users can contribute, using Zotero.  (The initial listings have been created by fellows of our NEH Institute, and draw heavily on research on the "spatial turn" by Dr. Jo Guldi of the Harvard Society of Fellows.)  The site will also aggregate Twitter feeds and social bookmarks related to the #geoinst hashtag, and GIS-related threads from Digital Humanities Questions and Answers (DH Answers) and the GIS Stack Exchange.  Finally, it will include an edited publication called "Step By Step," in which scholars and GIS professionals share easy-to-follow tutorials and guides to getting things done in spatial teaching and research.

I'll post again to Humanist when we unveil the project in a few weeks!  In the meantime, a quick peek at Q&A threads tagged "GIS" in DH Answers reveals some recommended projects and even more readings on spatial humanities, which themselves contain project references: 

http://digitalhumanities.org/answers/tags/gis 

DH Answers itself would be another great place to ask this question!  I'm looking forward to the responses you get here and perhaps there, and to our opportunity to add them to the forthcoming "Spatial Humanities" clearinghouse.

Best,
Bethany

Bethany Nowviskie, MA Ed., Ph.D.
Director, Digital Research & Scholarship, UVa Library
Associate Director, Scholarly Communication Institute
VP, Association for Computers & the Humanities
bethany at virginia.edu | http://nowviskie.org/ | @nowviskie

--[3]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Wed, 16 Mar 2011 15:12:43 -0500
        From: Sara Schmidt <saschmidt8 at gmail.com>
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 24.786 GIS projects?
        In-Reply-To: <20110316062051.2A9141178E0 at woodward.joyent.us>


Ian Gregory's Historical GIS site ( http://www.hgis.org.uk ) has a list of
online historical gis projects:

http://www.hgis.org.uk/resources.htm#online_hgis

Mapping the Lakes: a literary gis

http://www.lancs.ac.uk/mappingthelakes/

The Map of Early Modern London

http://mapoflondon.uvic.ca/

Digital Literary Atlas of Ireland, 1922-1949

http://www.tcd.ie/longroomhub/digital-atlas/

Stanford U. Library's  Humanities GIS page has a list of projects

http://www-sul.stanford.edu/depts/gis/humanitiesgis.html

the Association of American Geographers' Historical GIS Clearinghouse and
Forum has a list of HGIS projects:

http://www.aag.org/cs/projects_and_programs/historical_gis_clearinghouse/hgis_projects_programs



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