[Humanist] 24.779 impediments to authorship attribution

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Mon Mar 14 07:54:28 CET 2011


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 24, No. 779.
         Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    "Brett D. Hirsch" <brett.hirsch at uwa.edu.au>               (33)
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 24.776 impediments to authorship attribution?

  [2]   From:    James Rovira <jamesrovira at gmail.com>                      (12)
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 24.776 impediments to authorship attribution?

  [3]   From:    "David L. Hoover" <david.hoover at nyu.edu>                  (67)
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 24.776 impediments to authorship attribution?


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Sun, 13 Mar 2011 18:22:38 +0800
        From: "Brett D. Hirsch" <brett.hirsch at uwa.edu.au>
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 24.776 impediments to authorship attribution?
        In-Reply-To: <20110313070653.722D4116C09 at woodward.joyent.us>

> I'm trying to find sources that discuss this sort of problem. I'm looking in
> the usual places like JSTOR and the MLA Bibliography, and I've got one
> researcher's work I'm going to chase down (Joseph Rudman), but I was  wondering
> if anyone had any other good leads on this sort of thing.  Thanks in advance for
> any and all pointers.

There are a number of researchers active in authorship attribution
studies of early modern drama: Hugh Craig, Mac Jackson, John Burrows,
Thomas Merriam, Lene Petersen, Brian Vickers and Marcus Dahl, Jonathan
Hope and Michael Witmore, Maura Giles-Watson, Ward Elliott and Robert
Valenza, and others.

You might start with Hugh Craig's recent article in EMLS:
 http://extra.shu.ac.uk/emls/15-1/craistyl.htm . You might also get in
touch with the London Forum for Authorship Studies, which has
sponsored meetings with many of the aforementioned scholars to discuss
new methods and findings:
 http://ies.sas.ac.uk/events/seminars/LFAS/index.htm .

Also keep an eye out for relevant chapters on authorship and
collaboration in the forthcoming Oxford Handbook to Middleton (2010),
the Oxford Handbook to Shakespeare (2011), the Oxford Complete Works
of John Ford (2011-13), and the Cambridge World Shakespeare
Encyclopedia (2012).

Best wishes,
Brett

-- 
Dr. Brett D. Hirsch
University Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies (M208)
University of Western Australia
http://www.notwithoutmustard.net/

Coordinating Editor, Digital Renaissance Editions
http://digitalrenaissance.arts.uwa.edu.au/

Co-Editor, Shakespeare
http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/shakespeare



--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Sun, 13 Mar 2011 09:17:58 -0400
        From: James Rovira <jamesrovira at gmail.com>
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 24.776 impediments to authorship attribution?
        In-Reply-To: <20110313070653.722D4116C09 at woodward.joyent.us>

This type of work has been a part of biblical exegesis for quite some time.  Check out the tclist at yahoo.com -- there are program developers on that list, or there were.

Jim R



--[3]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Sun, 13 Mar 2011 14:15:41 -0400
        From: "David L. Hoover" <david.hoover at nyu.edu>
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 24.776 impediments to authorship attribution?
        In-Reply-To: <20110313070653.722D4116C09 at woodward.joyent.us>

It is important to remember that spelling, punctuation, and lineation 
are simply a few of the features in which authorship can be located. 
Word frequency, ngrams, collocations, syntactic patterns, and so forth 
are somewhat more resistant to the intervention of editors, compositors, 
etc., and there is a tremendous amount of literature on authorship 
attribution that suggests that the author's individuality can be 
discerned even through those confounding factors. Three exemplary 
book-length studies that discuss some of the problems of Elizabethan 
plays and collaboration are the following:

Harold Love, /Attributing Authorship/ (Cambridge UP, 2002)
Hugh Craig and Arthur Kinney, /Shakespeare, Computers, and the Mystery 
of Authorship/ (Cambridge UP, 2009)
Sir Brian Vickers/, /Shakespeare, Co-Author. A Historical Study of Five 
Collaborative Plays// (OUP 2002)/
/
David Hoover
/
/
On 3/13/2011 3:06 AM, Humanist Discussion Group wrote:
>                   Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 24, No. 776.
>           Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
>                         www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
>                  Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
>
>
>
>          Date: Fri, 11 Mar 2011 13:49:24 -0800 (PST)
>          From: Tom Salyers<tsalyers at yahoo.com>
>          Subject: Question for Humanist
>
>
> [A question about a complex authorship problem]
>
> I'm in the middle of my PhD thesis, which involves using stylometry for
> authorship attribution in collaboratively-written Elizabethan plays or (plays
> reworked by subsequent playwrights). I'm working on a chapter right now that
> revolves around how hard it is to distinguish one author's style from another
> when the original  manuscripts are unavailable. Since the texts from the period
> have  been through the hands of editors, compositors, etc., over the last four
> hundred years, trying to determine an author's individual style when  all traces
> of the original spelling, punctuation, lineation, and so on  have been lost is
> difficult at best and near-impossible at worst.
>
> I'm trying to find sources that discuss this sort of problem. I'm looking in
> the usual places like JSTOR and the MLA Bibliography, and I've got one
> researcher's work I'm going to chase down (Joseph Rudman), but I was  wondering
> if anyone had any other good leads on this sort of thing.  Thanks in advance for
> any and all pointers.
>
> --
> Tom Salyers
>
-- 
           David L. Hoover, Professor of English, NYU
        212-998-8832       https://files.nyu.edu/dh3/public/

     Most of her friends had an anxious, haggard look, . . .
Basil Ransom wondered who they all were; he had a general idea
they were mediums, communists, vegetarians.
            -- Henry James, The Bostonians (1886)





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