[Humanist] 24.646 using WordPress

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Fri Jan 14 11:01:20 CET 2011


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 24, No. 646.
         Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Тома Тасовац <ttasovac at transpoetika.org>       (51)
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 24.644 who is using WordPress?

  [2]   From:    Thomas Crombez <thomas.crombez at ua.ac.be>                  (75)
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 24.644 who is using WordPress?

  [3]   From:    Aurélien_Berra <Aurelien.Berra at gmail.com>                (50)
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 24.644 who is using WordPress?

  [4]   From:    John Levin <john at anterotesis.com>                         (19)
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 24.644 who is using WordPress?

  [5]   From:    Julia Flanders <julia_flanders at brown.edu>                 (48)
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 24.644 who is using WordPress?

  [6]   From:    Joseph Vaughan <vaughan at hmc.edu>                          (51)
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 24.644 who is using WordPress?

  [7]   From:    Cathy Moran Hajo <cathy.hajo at nyu.edu>                     (15)
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 24.644 who is using WordPress?

  [8]   From:    "Bleck, Bradley" <BradB at spokanefalls.edu>                  (9)
        Subject: RE: [Humanist] 24.644 who is using WordPress?


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2011 08:56:47 +0100
        From: Тома Тасовац <ttasovac at transpoetika.org>
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 24.644 who is using WordPress?
        In-Reply-To: <20110113065038.25F62D3717 at woodward.joyent.us>


Dear John,

Wordpress is a good choice, not only because of what it does on its own, 
but because there are thousands of plug-ins that can extend it --
and a very large developer community that can help you code things 
yourself. 

I want to give you one example. At the Belgrade Center for Digital 
Humanities, we started a small project last year called Reklakaza.la 
(Serbian for "hearsay") which we described as an experiment in "joyful 
lexicography at the intersection of historical linguistics and gossip." 
We set up a Wordpress blog on which we publish selected (unusual, 
archaic, "weird", funny etc) entries from a classic 
19th-century Serbian dictionary by Vuk Stefanovic. 
The entries from the blog are also automatically distributed via Twitter 
(http://twitter.com/Vuk_Karadzic) and Facebook 
(http://facebook.com/reklakaza.la).  

The result? More than 24,000 fans on Facebook: a wild success 
considering the obscurity of the topic. 

Now, the interesting thing is that our readers comment almost 
exclusively on Facebook and not on the blog, which, I believe, says 
enough about the centrifugal power of social media. But the Wordpress 
blog was essential for us in that it gave us a very simple, highly 
usable editorial interface for this project. 

I hope this helps. Good luck with your seminar!

All best,
Toma 
Toma Tasovac
Center for Digital Humanities (Belgrade, Serbia) 
http://humanistika.org http://transpoetika.org

--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2011 09:32:09 +0100
        From: Thomas Crombez <thomas.crombez at ua.ac.be>
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 24.644 who is using WordPress?
        In-Reply-To: <20110113065038.25F62D3717 at woodward.joyent.us>


I find the CommentPress theme and plugin for WordPress still very useful 
for offering students a number of text fragments and images & let them 
start a discussion about it. CommentPress allows users to insert 
comments on every single paragraph or image of a page. (Here's an 
example from my course on philosophy of art, mainly in Dutch: 
http://webhost.ua.ac.be/theso/commentpress/?page_id=3D9)

We are also looking into using the multisite version of WordPress as a 
portfolio website for students of the Academy of Fine Arts, but that's 
still work in progress. If anyone out there has attempted this before, 
I'd be glad to hear of your experiences.

Best, Thomas Crombez
University of Antwerp // Royal Academy of Fine Arts, Antwerp

--[3]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2011 11:45:16 +0100
        From: Aurélien_Berra <Aurelien.Berra at gmail.com>
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 24.644 who is using WordPress?
        In-Reply-To: <20110113065038.25F62D3717 at woodward.joyent.us>


Dear John,

It might be of interest to you and others to know that Hypotheses.org is using WordPress (http://hypotheses.org). This is a large, diverse and rapidly growing platform for scholarly blogs in the humanities and social sciences. To date it comprises 155 blogs. Some of them are associated with ongoing seminars or collaborative research projects and the digital humanities are a recurrent topic (for a list and typology of the "carnets de recherche", please see http://www.revues.org/?page=catalogue&pubtype=carnet). Though mostly peopled by French academics and graduate students, the platform started hosting blogs in other languages (English and Spanish so far). As a recent member of the scientific council, I can say that this international development is one of its goals for the years to come.

Hypotheses.org is an initiative of the Centre pour l'édition électronique ouverte (Cléo, http://cleo.cnrs.fr), which also maintains Revues.org, the oldest French platform for scholarly journals (http://www.revues.org). The Cléo organised THATCamp Paris in May 2010. During this event a "Manifesto for the Digital Humanities" was drafted, whose English version is online (http://tcp.hypotheses.org/411).

I am myself building up a blog on Hypotheses.org, which will reflect the contents of a seminar on ancient texts and digital humanities (Philologie à venir, http://philologia.hypotheses.org). This work started with a short survey of the field. For the moment, I have been sharing online my references. Needless to say, I am very interested in your syllabus and similar enterprises.

Regards,

Aurélien

--

Aurélien Berra
Université Paris-Ouest & UMR ANHIMA



--[4]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2011 12:06:13 +0000
        From: John Levin <john at anterotesis.com>
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 24.644 who is using WordPress?
        In-Reply-To: <20110113065038.25F62D3717 at woodward.joyent.us>

On 13/01/2011 06:50, Humanist Discussion Group wrote:
>          Date: Wed, 12 Jan 2011 08:27:17 -0600
>          From: John Laudun<jlaudun at mac.com>
>          Subject: Who is using WordPress?
>
> I know there is a lot more open source software out there, both being used, adapted, and developed by many of you. Is there a list of it maintained somewhere? Is that something worth doing? (I am thinking it might be a course project that could be assigned.)
>

There is Dirt, Digital Research Tools
https://digitalresearchtools.pbworks.com/w/page/17801672/FrontPage
that lists many handy apps for DH projects, both free (in both meanings) 
and proprietary. But as far as I know, there isn't a specific resource 
for open source software useful for the digital humanities, nor one for 
floss apps produced by the DH community.

John

-- 
John Levin
http://www.anterotesis.com
johnlevin at joindiaspora.com
http://twitter.com/anterotesis



--[5]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2011 09:24:12 -0500
        From: Julia Flanders <julia_flanders at brown.edu>
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 24.644 who is using WordPress?
        In-Reply-To: <20110113065038.25F62D3717 at woodward.joyent.us>

John Melson and I will be using WordPress in a very similar way in a course we're teaching this semester on digital scholarship and public humanities. We're going to ask students to post almost all of their assignments to the WordPress blog (as well as whatever other informal postings they want to make), and to comment on each other's assignments, with the goal of helping them to think of their professional writing as something that can comfortably be done in a collegial environment and for an audience from the start. 

We are also planning ask the students to tag their postings with various keywords the class agrees upon, and to use WP plugins to generate some visual representations of things like the topic domains represented in our class "corpus", or the range of geographical reference, or the range of genres under discussion, that kind of thing. We're hoping that this may also encourage students to tag thoroughly/consistently (as well as illustrating the dynamics of crowd-sourced tagging) and that it may provide a more vivid sense of the blog as a single discursive space with many intellectual dimensions, rather than just as a repository where individuals drop things in. 

We'll see how it goes!

best, Julia

Julia Flanders
Director, Women Writers Project
Center for Digital Scholarship, Brown University Library


--[6]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2011 06:38:17 -0800
        From: Joseph Vaughan <vaughan at hmc.edu>
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 24.644 who is using WordPress?
        In-Reply-To: <20110113065038.25F62D3717 at woodward.joyent.us>

The comment press plugin for word press is a great way to have a group 
comment on a text, paragraph by paragraph. 
http://www.futureofthebook.org/commentpress/

Joseph Vaughan
CIO/Vice-President for Computing
and Information Services
Harvey Mudd College
vaughan at hmc.edu
909 621 8613

free/busy info at http://tinyurl.com/vaughanfreebusy




--[7]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2011 11:11:46 -0500
        From: Cathy Moran Hajo <cathy.hajo at nyu.edu>
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 24.644 who is using WordPress?
        In-Reply-To: <20110113065038.25F62D3717 at woodward.joyent.us>

Last semester I taught a course for NYU's Archives and Public History graduate program called Creating Digital History. Students located and digitized historical objects using Omeka as their content management system, created an Omeka exhibit, as well as projects building maps and timelines. This semester the course focused on the history of Greenwich Village. 
I used Wordpress for a blog on Researching Greenwich Village history. Students contributed a post a week on a number of categories--ranging from Interesting Facts, Interesting Web Resources, etc. and comment on each other's posting. The students liked using Wordpress, though they thought once a week postings was too many, and I was generally pleased with the results.

https://greenwichvillagehistory.wordpress.com/ 
Cathy Moran Hajo, Ph.D.
Associate Editor/Assistant Director
The Margaret Sanger Papers Project
Department of History, New York University
53 Washington Square South
New York, NY 10012
(212) 998-8666
(212) 995-4017 (fax)
cathy.hajo at nyu.edu

Visit our website at: http://www.nyu.edu/projects/sanger

--[8]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2011 08:26:47 -0800
        From: "Bleck, Bradley" <BradB at spokanefalls.edu>
        Subject: RE: [Humanist] 24.644 who is using WordPress?
        In-Reply-To: <20110113065038.25F62D3717 at woodward.joyent.us>

John,

I'm not a wordpress person (drupal for me) but you may want to talk to Keith Dorwick on your campus (and if your department!) if you haven't done so already. I don't know that he's a wordpress person, but I think he'd be a great resource to you. 

Bradley Bleck
Department of English
Spokane Falls Community College
bleckblog.org



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