[Humanist] 24.847 attracting students

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Mon Apr 4 10:47:00 CEST 2011


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 24, No. 847.
         Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Francois Lachance <lachance at chass.utoronto.ca>            (15)
        Subject: 8 1/2 Re: attracting students

  [2]   From:    Desmond Schmidt <desmond.schmidt at qut.edu.au>              (11)
        Subject: RE: [Humanist] 24.845 attracting students

  [3]   From:    Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>          (26)
        Subject: attracting students


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Sun, 3 Apr 2011 11:08:52 -0400
        From: Francois Lachance <lachance at chass.utoronto.ca>
        Subject: 8 1/2 Re: attracting students
        In-Reply-To: <20110403073733.8A807127381 at woodward.joyent.us>


A bit of forward looking on attracting students

Something to consider in a Humanist context

>From a news clipping:

<quote>
[Tilda] Swinton and her friend Mark Cousins, a film historian, are 
launching The 8 1/2 Foundation, an initiative funded by the Scottish 
government to introduce children to film classics they wouldn't get to see 
or rent in most venues. "We're making a website with clips of world cinema 
that Scottish children can click on, then they can write to us with the 
date of their 8 1/2 birthday, and we'll send them the film of their choice 
as a present, to inaugurate their film fandom," Swinton says
</quote>

For those curious ... http://eightandahalf.org/

Francois Lachance,Scholar-at-large
http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/~lachance



--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 4 Apr 2011 05:51:56 +1000
        From: Desmond Schmidt <desmond.schmidt at qut.edu.au>
        Subject: RE: [Humanist] 24.845 attracting students
        In-Reply-To: <20110403073733.8A807127381 at woodward.joyent.us>


Hi Tamara,

Others have also seen a contribution that humanists have already made to the development of computer science and to the human-computer interface in particular. 

But the discipline you may be seeking is HCI or Human-Computer Interaction. Perhaps we should, as you say, be more concerned with that. I wouldn't pretend to define what Humanities Computing is. But in essence it seems to be about the representation and computation of humanistic (usually literary) texts. There are many books on HCI, perhaps the most often cited is that by Ben Shneiderman: 'Designing the User Interface'.

Dr Desmond Schmidt
Information Security Institute
Faculty of Science and Technology
Queensland University of Technology
(07)3138-9509


--[3]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Mon, 04 Apr 2011 09:30:36 +0100
        From: Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
        Subject: attracting students
        In-Reply-To: <20110403073733.8A807127381 at woodward.joyent.us>

Research and teaching go together because they are symbiotic. Teaching 
duties of course interfere with time for research, and so become 
annoyances, esp when the students are apparently neither intelligent nor 
engaged. But without teaching the possible reminder (or just minder) of 
the beginner's vision of a field and of the motivation which comes from 
that vision slips away. I am thinking once again of Sunryu 
Suzuki-roshi's "beginner's mind" of many possibilities and great, 
open-eyed curiosity. It seems to me that to attract students we must 
exhibit such a beginner's mind and space in which it can, for a time, 
explore and grow and expand. (And we must stop giving students the 
mentally crippling script we currently hand them.)

Recently I was in a meeting of people who spoke of little more than 
infrastructure and support, very little about what the structure below 
supports. There were a number of occasions on which the few computer 
scientists in the room were referred to as "smart 'dumb computer 
scientists'". Then, some days later, I happened to watch a movie version 
of Kazuo Ishiguro's "Never Let Me Go".  So I wonder now about the 
relationship between Ishiguro's alternate world and our own.

Comments?

Yours,
WM
-- 
Professor Willard McCarty, Department of Digital Humanities, King's
College London; Centre for Cultural Research, University of Western
Sydney; Editor, Interdisciplinary Science Reviews (www.isr-journal.org);
Editor, Humanist (www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist/); www.mccarty.org.uk/





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