[Humanist] 24.302 getting involved

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Wed Sep 1 01:55:33 CEST 2010


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 24, No. 302.
         Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org



        Date: Tue, 31 Aug 2010 08:28:29 -0400
        From: Allen Beye Riddell <allen.riddell at duke.edu>
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 24.280 getting involved
        In-Reply-To: <20100824211205.0EE8E61C20 at woodward.joyent.us>


> I wish that I could challenge your assumptions and experience, but...
> a computer scientist who reads enough of the right books can become a
> good enough humanist in a much shorter time than a humanist can become
> an equally competent programmer.

There are some important counterexamples out there. I've run across a
fair number of PhDs in Computer Science who have a BA in Classics. One
concentration seems to be in Massachusetts -- with UMass (CS), Tufts,
and Harvard.

On Tue, 2010-08-24 at 21:12 +0000, Humanist Discussion Group wrote:
> Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 24, No. 280.
>          Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
>                        www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
>                 Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
> 
> 
> 
>         Date: Mon, 23 Aug 2010 17:20:39 -0400
>         From: James Rovira <jamesrovira at gmail.com>
>         Subject: Re: [Humanist] 24.275 getting involved
>         In-Reply-To: <20100823195833.1721365417 at woodward.joyent.us>
> 
> I think that Alan's advice is very good.  There are a great many tasks
> in humanities study that is made much easier with digital tools; a
> humanist who is interested in these tasks can probably become excited
> at the tools allowing them to do so.
> 
> But, I've been thinking along the lines of the following:
> 
> > When I reflect on the amount of time I had to devote to my major in
> > Computer Science as compared to my major (or even Ph.D.) in English I
> > think this is absolutely true.  Getting an interested computer
> > scientist situated in a humanities discipline would likely take much
> > less time than getting a humanist trained in advanced math (I say this
> > provocatively in the hopes that someone challenges my assumption and
> > experience).
> 
> I wish that I could challenge your assumptions and experience, but...
> a computer scientist who reads enough of the right books can become a
> good enough humanist in a much shorter time than a humanist can become
> an equally competent programmer.
> 
> I think that if we changed our education systems so that students
> couldn't graduate college without at least two full years of calculus,
> the situation might be different.  That's a change I'd favor, by the
> way...
> 
> Jim R




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