[Humanist] 24.49 how quaint the revolution

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Sun May 23 07:29:57 CEST 2010


                  Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 24, No. 49.
         Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
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        Date: Sat, 22 May 2010 09:55:10 -0400
        From: Patrick Durusau <patrick at durusau.net>
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 24.46 how quaint the revolution
        In-Reply-To: <20100522070256.1E18C5A428 at woodward.joyent.us>

Charles,

On 5/22/2010 3:02 AM, Humanist Discussion Group wrote:
>                    Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 24, No. 46.
>           Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
>                         www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
>                  Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
>
>
>
>          Date: Sat, 22 May 2010 07:28:39 +0200
>          From: Charles Ess<cmess at drury.edu>
>          Subject: Re: [Humanist] 24.44 how quaint the revolution
>          In-Reply-To:<20100521063211.E509D590C5 at woodward.joyent.us>
>
>
>    
On 22 May 2010 Charles Ess wrote:
> Hi Willard et co.
>
> On 5/21/10 8:32 AM, "Humanist Discussion Group"
> <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>  wrote:
>
>    
>> I wonder, what are we doing to ensure that amidst all the shouting
>> of revolution and the rearguard action against change we clear a space in
>> which the changes may be contemplated and the choices we must make are well
>> informed? What are we doing to observe rather than merely assert? To train
>> the next generation of scholars to be able to *see* what is happening? To be
>> able to recognize the new?
>>      
> Funny you should mention ...
> I've just completed a bit of a review of the following, then "revolutionary"
> promises and developments in computing, humanities computing and
> computer-mediated communication:
>
>    
<snip>So maybe a quick answer to your question is: a little historical 
sensibility
> as a counterpart to especially 1980s' and 1990s' post-modern enthusiasms for
> discarding the past as no longer relevant?
>
>    

Just curious which "post-modern enthusiasms" you see as "discarding the 
past"?

I have recently been adding to my collection of Umberto Eco's published 
essays and I would not characterize them as "discarding the past."

Hard to make generalizations about something as diverse as 
post-modernists but that hasn't been my impression of post-modernists 
overall.

Granting that in my CS reading, there appears to be a lack of knowledge 
of or interest in what I would call the recent past (20 or 30 years) in 
CS. I don't think that is attributable to being "post-modern."

Hope you are having a great weekend!

Patrick

-- 
Patrick Durusau
patrick at durusau.net
Chair, V1 - US TAG to JTC 1/SC 34
Convener, JTC 1/SC 34/WG 3 (Topic Maps)
Editor, OpenDocument Format TC (OASIS), Project Editor ISO/IEC 26300
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Homepage: http://www.durusau.net





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