[Humanist] 23.703 events many & various

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Sat Mar 13 10:17:42 CET 2010


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 23, No. 703.
         Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Andy Miah <email at andymiah.net>                            (28)
        Subject: Posthuman Lifestyles

  [2]   From:    Arianna Ciula <ACiula at esf.org>                            (16)
        Subject: ESF-LiU Conference: Paying Attention: Digital Media Cultures
                andGenerational Responsibility

  [3]   From:    Arianna Ciula <ACiula at esf.org>                            (15)
        Subject: ESF Call for Exploratory Workshops now Open

  [4]   From:    "Tabata, Tomoji" <tabata at lang.osaka-u.ac.jp>              (69)
        Subject: Event: Osaka Workshop on Digital Humanities

  [5]   From:    Peter Robinson <P.M.Robinson at BHAM.AC.UK>                  (24)
        Subject: 2010 ESTS conference: Pisa and Florence, November 25-27

  [6]   From:    Emily Cullen <e.cullen at RIA.IE>                            (31)
        Subject: HII / GII Joint Programme in Digital Humanities - Lecture &
                Seminarby Professor Michael Shanks (Stanford) 24 & 25 March
                2010


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Fri, 12 Mar 2010 08:51:45 +0000
        From: Andy Miah <email at andymiah.net>
        Subject: Posthuman Lifestyles


Dear All, 

Please find below info about a wee lecture I'm giving in a couple of weeks.
It may appeal to some of you. We're hoping to live stream, but it'd be great
to see some friendly faces from afar.

Posthuman Lifestyles: Has the Future Arrived?
Inaugural lecture of Professor Andy Miah
University of the West of Scotland
23 March, 2010 @ the CCA, Glasgow, 6pm (arrivals)
http://www.andymiah.net/2010/03/10/posthuman-lifestyles-has-the-future-arriv
ed/

The year 2010 marks the 10-year anniversary of two technological revolutions
­ the genetic and the digital. It is also one of the most prominent years
projected as Œthe future¹ in 20th century science fiction. Professor Miah¹s
inaugural lecture will discuss his contribution to imagining the future and
critiquing the present, by outlining the successes and failures of an
emerging technological culture that marks the end of humanism.

To register, please email marketing at uws.ac.uk or call 0141 848 3598
Map to venue: http://tiny.cc/fgAxS

Best wishes,

Andy

PS: we do have limited space, so please get in touch with our marketing
team, if you'd like to come.

http://twitter.com/andymiah

Professor Andy Miah, BA, MPhil, PhD | http://www.andymiah.net
Chair of Ethics and Emerging Technologies
Faculty of Business & Creative Industries,
University of the West of Scotland,
Ayr Campus, KA8 0SR, UK



--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Fri, 12 Mar 2010 10:17:19 +0100
        From: Arianna Ciula <ACiula at esf.org>
        Subject: ESF-LiU Conference: Paying Attention: Digital Media Cultures and Generational Responsibility

ESF-LiU Conference: Paying Attention: Digital Media Cultures and Generational Responsibility 
Linköping, Sweden, 6-10 September 2010 
Closing date for applications: 1 May 2010
More information: www.esf.org/conferences/10316

"Paying Attention" concerns the politics, ethics and aesthetics of the attention economy. This is the social and technical milieu in which web native generations live much of their lives. It will address key questions like: What architectures of power are at work in the attention economy? How is it building new structures of experience? What kinds of value does this architecture produce? "Paying Attention" encourages dialogue between researchers from the fields of Cultural and New Media Studies, Education, Communications, Economics, Internet studies, Human Computer Interface Studies, Art and Design. It also seeks the input and insights of creative practitioners exploring critical and alternative uses of new media forms and technologies.

==
Dr. Arianna Ciula
Science Officer

European Science Foundation 
Humanities Unit
1 quai Lezay Marnésia 
BP 90015
F-67080 Strasbourg
France

Email: aciula at esf.org
Tel: +33 (0) 388767104



--[3]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Fri, 12 Mar 2010 10:22:18 +0100
        From: Arianna Ciula <ACiula at esf.org>
        Subject: ESF Call for Exploratory Workshops now Open

I am pleased to inform you that the 2010 Call for Exploratory Workshops proposals - aimed at events to be held in 2011 - is now available on the ESF website at http://www.esf.org/activities/exploratory-workshops.html.

The deadline for submitting proposals is 29 April 2010.

Each year, ESF supports approximately 50 Exploratory Workshops across all scientific domains.

These small, interactive group sessions are aimed at opening up new directions in research to explore new fields with a potential impact on developments in science. The workshops, which usually last 1-3 days, have a wide participation from across Europe and involve mature scientists as well as young, independent researchers and scholars with leadership potential. The relatively small scale (in terms of people involved) provides an ideal platform for focus on the topic and for all participants to contribute to discussions and plan follow-up collaborative work.  Interdisciplinary topics are greatly encouraged.

==
Dr. Arianna Ciula
Science Officer

European Science Foundation 
Humanities Unit
1 quai Lezay Marnésia 
BP 90015
F-67080 Strasbourg
France

Email: aciula at esf.org
Tel: +33 (0) 388767104



--[4]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Fri, 12 Mar 2010 20:05:27 +0900
        From: "Tabata, Tomoji" <tabata at lang.osaka-u.ac.jp>
        Subject: Event: Osaka Workshop on Digital Humanities
        In-Reply-To: <20100312072416.4DDA64F265 at woodward.joyent.us>

2010 Osaka Workshop on Digital Humanities

Period: Saturday 20th--Monday 22nd March 2010
Venue: Graduate School of Language and Culture, Toyonaka Campus, University of Osaka

===========================================
Flyer: English version http://www.lang.osaka-u.ac.jp/~dhw2010/Osaka_Workshop_poster_Blue.pdf
Flyer: Japanese version http://www.lang.osaka-u.ac.jp/~dhw2010/Osaka_Workshop_poster_Blue_JP.pdf
(Access map)| http://www.osaka-u.ac.jp/en/access/index.html
(Campus map)| http://www.osaka-u.ac.jp/en/access/toyonaka.html

Target Audience and the Aim of the Workshop
===========================================
Computers are coming to play a steadily more prominent role in the various fields of modern scholarship, including literature, linguistics, cultural studies, history, and religious studies. The goal of this workshop is to raise awareness of how we can apply digital technologies in humanities studies. Lectures by invited speakers will provide a general introduction to the state of the art in digital humanities as well as excellent examples of computer-assisted text analysis and creation and management of humanities digital resources. Hands-on workshop exercises will provide an opportunity for participants to acquire practical skills by trying out some of the resources and techniques demonstrated in the lectures. Discussion sessions will be held to complement the lectures and workshops, through which participants will have a chance to receive expert advice on how to initiate and develop their own projects.

Invited speakers
===========================================
Harold Short, John Lavagnino, Gerhard Brey (Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London)
Lisa Lena Opas-Hänninen(University of Oulu, Finland)
Espen S. Ore(University of Oslo, Norway)
Tomoji Tabata, Maki Miyake, Yu'ichiro Kobayashi (University of Osaka)

Registering for the Workshop
===========================================
Tuition fee: JPY 4,000 (including coffee/snack and teaching materials). A reduced rate of JPY 3,000 applies to students.
To sign-up, send e-mail to dhw2010 at lang.osaka-u.ac.jp with the following information.

1) Name
2) Affiliation
3) Contact: E-mail address
4) Operating System (OS) of your computer (e.g., Windows 7, Mac OS X, Windows XP, etc.)
5) The course to sign-up: A) Text analysis/Text mining or B) Digitization of scholarly humanities resources. 

Notes

* All participants are advised to bring their own laptops. Wi-Fi internet connection will be available in the venue.
* Unfortunately, we cannot offer accommodation for participants. But, [here are useful links for those who wish to find accommodation in Osaka.|http://www.hankyu-hotel.com/cgi-bin2/cms2/index_en.cgi?hid=23senrihh | http://www.holidaycityjapan.com/osakahotels/]

Provisional Timetable
===========================================
Sat. 20 March
Core programme (common to Rooms 1 & 2): Plenary introduction to ditigal humanities:

Time			Contents
12:00--			Registration
13:00--13:15	Opening
13:15--14:15	Harold Short (King's), Digital Humanities: Introduction and Overview 
14:20--15:20	Espen S. Ore (Oslo), Digitisation, databases and text encoding
15:20--15:50	Coffee Break
15:50--16:50	Lisa Lena Opas-Hänninen(Oulu), Text corpora / literary and linguistic analysis
17:00--18:00	John Lavagnino and Gerhard Brey (King's), Manuscripts and digital editions

Sun. 21 March
Parallel sessions
	◦	Room 1: Text analysis/Text mining
	▪	Lisa Lena Opas-Hänninen, Gerhard Brey, Tomoji Tabata, and Maki Miyake
	◦	Room 2: Digital database/Digitization of cultural heritage
	▪	Espen Ore, Kiyonori Nagasaki, and John Lavagnino

Time			Contents
10:00--12:00	Session 1 (Core Programme) Lecture & hands-on exercises
12:00--13:30
Lunch
13:30--15:30	Session 2 Lecture & hands-on exercises
16:00--18:00	Session 3 Lecture & hands-on exercises

Mon. 22 March
Parallel sessions & Common programme
	◦	Room 1: Text analysis/Text mining
	▪	Lisa Lena Opas-Hänninen, Tomoji Tabata and Yu'ichiro Kobayashi
	◦	Room 2: Digital database/Digitization of cultural heritage
	▪	Espen Ore, Kiyonori Nagasaki, and John Lavagnino
Time			Contents
09:30--10:50	Session 4 Advanced exercises
11:10--12:30	Session 5 Advanced exercises
12:30--14:00
Lunch
14:00--15:30	Session 6
15:30			Closing
===========================================

2010 Osaka Workshop on Digital Humanities Organizing Team
Contact/Queries: dhw2010 at lang.osaka-u.ac.jp


--[5]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Fri, 12 Mar 2010 19:53:34 +0000
        From: Peter Robinson <P.M.Robinson at BHAM.AC.UK>
        Subject: 2010 ESTS conference: Pisa and Florence, November 25-27
        In-Reply-To: <20100312072416.4DDA64F265 at woodward.joyent.us>

Dear everyone

We have pleasure in announcing the call for papers for the 2010  
conference of the European Society for Textual Scholarship, organized  
locally by the Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pisa, where the  
Thursday and Friday sessions will be held, with the Saturday session  
hosted by the Società Dantesca Italiana, and held in the Palagio  
dell'Arte della Lana, Florence.

Further information, with submission dates for proposals, etc, is at
http://www.ilc.cnr.it/ests2010
and
http://www.textualscholarship.eu/conference-2010.html

Best wishes

Peter Robinson

Institute for Textual Scholarship and Electronic Editing
Elmfield House, Selly Oak  Campus
University of Birmingham
Edgbaston B29 6LG
P.M.Robinson at bham.ac.uk
p. +44 (0)121 4158441, f. +44 (0) 121 415 8376
www.itsee.bham.ac.uk


--[6]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Thu, 11 Mar 2010 17:16:33 +0000
        From: Emily Cullen <e.cullen at RIA.IE>
        Subject: HII / GII Joint Programme in Digital Humanities - Lecture & Seminarby Professor Michael Shanks (Stanford) 24 & 25 March 2010
        In-Reply-To: <20100312072416.4DDA64F265 at woodward.joyent.us>


Professor Michael Shanks http://www.stanford.edu/%7Emshanks/ , Omar and Althea Dwyer Hoskins Professor of Classical Archaeology at Stanford University, a Visiting Professor as part of the joint HII / GII Programme in Digital Humanities, will visit UCD on 24 & 25 March 2010.  He will participate in two events during his stay.  Please forward details of these events to colleagues and students in your area.  If you are interested in attending either event please email hii at ucd.ie<mailto:hii at ucd.ie> to reserve a place.

Wednesday 24 March 2010 – Guest Lecture: Digital Humanities: an archaeological prospect from Silicon Valley
Venue: C108, Newman Building, Belfield
Time: 3 p.m.
Thursday 25 March 2010 – Seminar: Digital culture and the future of the Humanities
Venue: H204, UCD Humanities Institute Seminar Room
Time: 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. / 1.30 p.m. – 3.30 p.m.

Computation, information technology, digital media, and social software meet the Humanities. Institutional investment in the Digital Humanities is accelerating. Is this to be a new discipline? What of traditional forms of Humanistic scholarship? What are the implications of digital culture for the Academy? Professor Shanks will acknowledge new trends and ground a critique of digitally-enabled Humanities in a fresh perspective on humanistic scholarship since the eighteenth century, broadening the context from the Academy to cover new developments in digital culture, including social software, located and ubiquitous media, virtual worlds and Web 3.0. As an archaeologist, his focus is through memory practices and archives, long term historical trends, and cultural heritage, on issues such as cultural property, globalization and social justice, identity and documentation, and materiality/immateriality.

Prof Shanks will argue that the key issues facing the contemporary Humanities are to do with the basic practices of that cultural sector typically called the public sphere. The forms of text, image, publication, dissemination, critique, commentary, and debate are achieving a fungibility that prompts a radical evaluation of how the Humanities address matters of common and pressing concern, requiring even an examination of the qualities of humane living.
________________________________
Michael Shanks is the Omar and Althea Dwyer Hoskins Professor of Classical Archaeology at Stanford University, the heart of Silicon Valley. He is a Director of Stanford Humanities Lab and is a founder of Stanford Strategy Studio. His lab in Stanford Archaeology Center is called Metamedia. Michael has worked on the archaeology of early farmers in northern Europe, Greek cities in the Mediterranean, has researched the design of beer cans, and the future of mobile media for Daimler Chrysler; currently he is exploring the English borders with Scotland with new excavations of the Roman town of Binchester, and investigating the Anglo-American antiquarian tradition as a key to a fresh view of the early history of science.

His lab at Stanford, Metamedia, is pioneering the use of Web 2.0 technologies to facilitate collaborative multidisciplinary research networks in design history, media materialities and long-term historical trends. This comes after a long collaboration with the European performance company Brith Gof and with performance artists in an international collaborative research project - the Presence Project - arts practice in multimedia. As a Director of Stanford Humanities Lab, he has championed experimental research and development in transdisciplinary Arts and Humanities, building bridges to a bigger picture on our contemporary cultural condition. A key theme in his current lab projects is the future of The Archive.

A series of critical interventions in debates about the character of the archaeological past, including the books ReConstructing Archaeology (1987), Social Theory and Archaeology (1987), Experiencing the Past (1992), Art and the Early Greek State (1999) and Theatre/Archaeology (2001) have made him a key figure in contemporary archaeological thought. For Michael, archaeologists do not discover the past; they work on what remains. Archaeology, the discipline of things, design and making, is about our relationships with what is left of the past. This means we are all archaeologists now; cultural heritage lies at the core of who we think we are, and how we might respond to the challenges of today and tomorrow.
________________________________

--
Emily Cullen, Ph.D.,
Programme Co-ordinator
Digital Humanities Observatory
28-32 Upper Pembroke Street
Dublin 2
Ireland

Tel:+353(0)1-2342442
Fax:+353(0)1-2342400
E-mail: e.cullen at ria.ie<mailto:e.cullen at ria.ie>
http://dho.ie
--

-- A Project of the Royal Irish Academy --


More information about the Humanist mailing list