[Humanist] 23.690 collaborative data curation

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Wed Mar 10 07:25:01 CET 2010


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 23, No. 690.
         Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    René Audet <rene.audet at lit.ulaval.ca>                    (20)
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 23.686 collaborative data curation?

  [2]   From:    Jeff Drouin <jdrouin at gc.cuny.edu>                         (63)
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 23.686 collaborative data curation?


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Tue, 09 Mar 2010 06:46:01 -0500
        From: René Audet <rene.audet at lit.ulaval.ca>
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 23.686 collaborative data curation?


>                  Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 23, No. 686.
>          Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
>                        www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
>                 Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
> 
>         Date: Mon, 8 Mar 2010 11:31:17 -0600
>         From: Martin Mueller <martinmueller at northwestern.edu>
>         Subject: Collaborative data curation in the humanities
> 
> I would like to find out more about forms of collaborative data curation in
>  humanities projects projects that can serve scholarly and pedagogical
>  purposes. In particular, I am interested in "dispersed annotation," as it is
>  called by the authors of a review of similar projects in genome research,
>  "Community annotation: procedures, protocols, and supporting tools"
>  (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17065605).
> 
> Here are four projects, in no particular order, about which I know something.
>  I will be very grateful to hear about others, and I will be happy to share
>  whatever information I receive.
> 
> Distributed Proofreaders (http://www.pgdp.net/c/) engages volunteers (about
>  3,0000 a month) in the task of correcting transcriptional errors in Project
>  Gutenberg texts on a page-by-page basis.
[...]

Have a look to Bite-size Edits, a project of BookOven, a startup based in Montreal. It is not a digital humanities as such, but links to the production chain in the field of edition — such an interesting move from DH to the concrete world of editing a book outside of the academic world.

http://bitesizeedits.com/
http://bookoven.com

René Audet

______________________________________________________________
René Audet
Professeur, Département des littératures
Titulaire, Chaire de recherche du Canada en littérature contemporaine
Centre de recherche interuniversitaire sur la littérature et la culture québécoises (CRILCQ)
Université Laval, Québec

mail  rene.audet at lit.ulaval.ca
web  http://contemporain.info
bur   Pavillon Charles-De Koninck, bureau 7173
tél    418 656 2131, poste 2459
fax   418 656 2991


--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Tue, 9 Mar 2010 09:42:16 -0500
        From: Jeff Drouin <jdrouin at gc.cuny.edu>
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 23.686 collaborative data curation?
        In-Reply-To: <20100309062703.3194C4C1E1 at woodward.joyent.us>

Dear Martin,

I don't know if this is the kind of thing you're looking for, but I've had my 
students curate avant-garde periodicals at the Modernist Journals Project 
(modjourn.org) by means of an interactive timeline. As part of the process, 
they tagged content according to the major information types (author, genre, 
item title, periodical title, periodical date, topical and conceptual key 
terms, etc.), described the items, and linked to the items' image pages in 
the MJP. Students actively investigated literary modernism in its original 
context, while also learning a bit of textual and bibliographic criticism and 
an expanded awareness of how interactive media can be employed to study a 
text or a body of texts. It also reinforced the social responsibility of 
knowledge production.

The curation activity was a cumulative step toward collaborative and 
individual research essays, all of which were posted to the course website. 
Students applied meta-critical tags to both the primary material in the 
archive and the secondary material they produced.

The idea was that the course produced a resource that was useful to classmates 
and outside scholars alike, especially since modernist magazines are still a 
relatively untilled field. So it's research and pedagogy rolled into one.

The timeline and course website run on Drupal and an Exhibit/SIMILE script 
from MIT. The course ran at Brooklyn College but I put the technology on the 
Macaulay Honors College server because I didn't have enough access at BC.

http://macaulay.cuny.edu/seminars/material-modernism/timeline.html

Jeff



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