[Humanist] 23.667 Yale, the past, the future -- & comp lit

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Mon Mar 1 07:39:21 CET 2010


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 23, No. 667.
         Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    "Totosy de Zepetnek, Steven" <clcweb at purdue.edu>         (140)
        Subject: totosy Re: [Humanist] 23.663 Yale, the past and the future

  [2]   From:    DrWender at aol.com                                           (8)
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 23.663 Yale, the past and the future

  [3]   From:    Richard Heinzkill <heinzkil at uoregon.edu>                   (5)
        Subject: Comparative Literature as a discipline


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Sun, 28 Feb 2010 12:46:15 +0000
        From: "Totosy de Zepetnek, Steven" <clcweb at purdue.edu>
        Subject: totosy Re: [Humanist] 23.663 Yale, the past and the future
        In-Reply-To: <20100228083212.E06CA40FE5 at woodward.joyent.us>

willard: the parallel you intend to draw is problematic because comparative literature as a discipline is under much pressure and constriction in Europe, Canada, as well as the US for many years now (and there is ample material published about this), although the pronouncements of the discipline's death by such as Susan Bassnett or Gayatry Chakravorty Spivak appear to be misguided: while the death of the discipline is indeed an issue in the "center," in the so-called periphery (i.e., Lastin America, Asia, etc.) the discipline is growing. what i am trying to say is that the parallel of digital humanities and comparative literature is not a parallel i would like consider; in addition, comparative literature as a discipline has been in a "perpetual crisis" (weissstein 1966) since its inception in the nineteenth century and institutionally there has been one single country where it was able to establish itself in numbers (i.e., departments), structure, institutional relevance, etc., and that was the US and there in the last many years this established institutional relevance has been dissipating. i discuss several of these aspects in an article: Totosy de Zepetnek, Steven. "The New Humanities: The Intercultural, the Comparative, and the Interdisciplinary." Globalization and the Futures of Comparative Literature. Ed. Jan M. Ziolkowski and Alfred J. López. The Global South 1.2 (2007): 45-68.
 
best, steven

steven totosy de zepetnek ph.d. professor
http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/clcweblibrary/totosycv
editor, clcweb: comparative literature and culture
http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/clcweb/ clcweb at purdue.edu
series editor, purdue books in comparative cultural studies
http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/clcweblibrary/seriespurdueccs &
http://www.thepress.purdue.edu/comparativeculturalstudies.html
8 sunset road, winchester, ma 01890 usa
	think of trees before printing this email

On Feb 28, 2010, at 8:32 am, Humanist Discussion Group wrote:

> 
>                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 23, No. 663.
>         Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
>                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
>                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
> 
>  [1]   From:    Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>          (24)
>        Subject: parallels to Yale?
> 
>  [2]   From:    Amanda Gailey <amanda.gailey at gmail.com>                   (46)
>        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 23.659 Yale, the past and the future
> 
>  [3]   From:    "Joe Raben" <joeraben at cox.net>                            (1)
>        Subject: Yale, the past and future
> 
> 
> --[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
>        Date: Thu, 25 Feb 2010 08:07:20 +0000
>        From: Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
>        Subject: parallels to Yale?
> 
> The thought has circulated for years that as a field the digital 
> humanities bears some structural resemblance to comparative literature, 
> i.e. that comp-lit and digital humanities have similar institutional 
> qualities. This leads me to wonder about the establishment of comp-lit 
> as an institutional entity, in particular because of the discussion of 
> the Yale conference, whether similar things happened when it became an 
> academic entity. Did it show up late at places like Yale after there had 
> been departments, centres or quasi-departments at less prestigious 
> institutions, and if so, did its institutionalization there make a big 
> difference? Are there other, perhaps closer parallels for us to consider?
> 
> I recall that at Toronto the three senior professors who began comp-lit 
> (this includes Northrop Frye) had first to teach it informally, on their 
> own time, and then to resign or threaten to do so for the administration 
> finally to recognize it. At King's College London it remains a programme 
> rather than a department. In particular instances it would be 
> interesting to know how comp-lit has established its particular identity 
> as a discipline.
> 
> Yours,
> WM
> -- 
> Willard McCarty, Professor of Humanities Computing,
> King's College London, staff.cch.kcl.ac.uk/~wmccarty/;
> Editor, Humanist, www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist;
> Interdisciplinary Science Reviews, www.isr-journal.org.
> 
> 


--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Sun, 28 Feb 2010 11:31:33 EST
        From: DrWender at aol.com
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 23.663 Yale, the past and the future
        In-Reply-To: <20100228083212.E06CA40FE5 at woodward.joyent.us>


In einer eMail vom 28.2.2010 09:32:26 Westeuropäische Normalzeit schreibt 
willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk: 

> Are there other, perhaps closer parallels for us to consider?

Statistics as 'transdisciplinary discipline' holds chairs in departments of 
economical or social sciences, defines a clear cutted field of research, 
but is - when I see it right - at least in Germany not installed as 
'department'.

Herbert



--[3]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Sun, 28 Feb 2010 16:46:17 -0800
        From: Richard Heinzkill <heinzkil at uoregon.edu>
        Subject: Comparative Literature as a discipline
        In-Reply-To: <20100228083212.E06CA40FE5 at woodward.joyent.us>

You might want to consult the following for a start----

Title:  Comparative literature as academic discipline : a statement of principles, praxis, standards
Author:  Robert J Clements
Publisher:  New York : Modern Language Association of America,1978.

Richard Heinzkill, retired Humanities Librarian, University of Oregon Library





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