[Humanist] 24.157 text-analysis in the popular media

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Wed Jun 30 09:18:55 CEST 2010


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 24, No. 157.
         Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
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        Date: Tue, 29 Jun 2010 10:53:49 +0100
        From: Martin Wynne <martin.wynne at oucs.ox.ac.uk>
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 24.151 text analysis in the popular media?
        In-Reply-To: <20100626071815.2C4565A5C8 at woodward.joyent.us>

Hi Mark,

Word clouds made it into the popular media in the recent UK election 
campaign. The BBC coverage of the leaders' debates included word clouds 
for each participant immediately after the end of the debate, and word 
and tag clouds of twitter contributions on the topic of the debates 
(although the journalist who presented it clearly didn't know how to 
interpret them!). It was a live TV broadcast and I can't find a record 
of it for you, unfortunately.

They also appear fairly regularly in the press - see for example 
http://blogs.ft.com/westminster/2010/06/budget-word-cloud/.

Best wishes,
Martin

On 26/06/10 08:18, Humanist Discussion Group wrote:
>                   Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 24, No. 151.
>           Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
>                         www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
>                  Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
>
>
>
>          Date: Fri, 25 Jun 2010 14:28:24 -0600
>          From: Mark Davies<Mark_Davies at byu.edu>
>          Subject: Popular media use of text analyses
>
> In a week or two I'm giving a conference presentation where I'd like to spend just a bit of time looking beyond "high level" corpus and text analyses to see what types of things are percolating down to the popular media (or even newspapers). So I'm looking for examples where popular media and newspapers have done informal text analyses, which are presented in user-friendly graphical format -- something like http://www.nytimes.com/ref/washington/20070123_STATEOFUNION.html, and probably more than just a  simple Wordle word cloud. If you have a link or two and might send them my way, I'll post a list of the links.
>
> Thanks in advance,
>
> Mark Davies
>
> ============================================
> Mark Davies
> Professor of (Corpus) Linguistics
> Brigham Young University
> (phone) 801-422-9168 / (fax) 801-422-0906
> Web: http://davies-linguistics.byu.edu
>
> ** Corpus design and use // Linguistic databases **
> ** Historical linguistics // Language variation **
> ** English, Spanish, and Portuguese **
> ============================================
   

-- 
Martin Wynne
Research Technologies Service&
Oxford e-Research Centre

Oxford University Computing Services
7-19 Banbury Road
Oxford
UK - OX2 6NN
Tel: +44 1865 283299 or +44 1865 610677
Fax: +44 1865 273275
martin.wynne at oucs.ox.ac.uk





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