[Humanist] 24.109 vending machines and cartoons

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Mon Jun 14 07:27:12 CEST 2010


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 24, No. 109.
         Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    { brad brace } <bbrace at eskimo.com>                        (66)
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 24.106 vending machine to experimental device

  [2]   From:    Jascha Kessler <urim1 at verizon.net>                        (76)
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 24.107 cartoon physics


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Sun, 13 Jun 2010 06:08:45 -0700 (PDT)
        From: { brad brace } <bbrace at eskimo.com>
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 24.106 vending machine to experimental device
        In-Reply-To: <20100613071851.5C76362B5A at woodward.joyent.us>


you are numbered
you are product
you are doomed

PROXY Gallery
http://cart.iabrace.com

now showing: Profile Portraits (the california collection)
build your own exhibition + catalogue

PROXY Gallery (the california collection): Your profile photo may be in these
Profile Portraits! Thousands of enlarged (custom, patented algorithms) and enhanced
photographs (now, likely several hundred thousands, soon over a million,) mostly
low-res cellphone, web-cam, and low-end digital camera self-portraits
(self-packaging), culled from dating/social websites -- as you might expect, there
is some explicit content (more than is permitted here unfortunately: you really
should see them all, but it probably makes little difference) -- fascinating and
occasionally disturbing. I've decided to also add a painting-filter. You may realize
that this is not the first time I've collected anonymous found-public imagery:
notably dumpster-diving at photofinishers' in the 70's. And of course, the
"Insatiable Abstraction Engine" -- collections from newsgroups. But come to think
it, nearly all my work involves repeated multiples or collections of imagery.
Whenever possible I retained any color casts, cropping and lighting. The portraits
are actually very considered, sometimes selections made/altered merely to obscure
the identity that they wished to presumably portray initially. Sunglasses are a
popular ruse, as are close-ups of cleavage, butts, tattoos, feet and groins.
(Curiously, I've yet to see a picture of hands... ok, now I have: some intricate
fingernails and the love/hate finger-tats.) Many feature-obilerating
camera-flash-portraits in the bathroom mirror. And some, but surprisingly few, are
filched from somewhere online, but this must be a risky choice in the event of an
'actual encounter.' How much introductory information/description do you want to put
out there to begin with? There are some very creative, even artful, solutions to
this dilemma. Various select groups of portraits are included in each PDF
ebook/catalogue for $250 (sorry about the price but it was a hellish amount of work
and I guarantee you won't be disappointed or YMB), and must be ordered directly. The
images contain sufficient resolution to print them out on letter-size/A4 paper for
an instant exhibition. Use my verified Paypal account to have the DVD delivered at
no charge: [bbrace at eskimo.com; http://bbrace.laughingsquid.net/buy-into.html] Having
been recently kicked-off Facebook (there was a depicted nipple!), and losing 5,000
so-called friends - the perfect place to host a social-media
profile-portrait-museum, I've decided to also open an online storefront where
individual high-res files will sell for only $1/each. [http://cart.iabrace.com] The
prints of course required different custom algorithms and some masterful retouching
-- they look great!  Technically given the incredibly diverse range of imagery it
was difficult to make them all equally legible; despite a variety of intricate
processing directives, the scripts would inevitably crash or be unable to render a
decent image. These were handled individually as were the painting-filters. If I
receive a reasonable number of orders, I'll offer additional states of the union or
countries... but California had to be the place to begin. Sure to be a collectors'
(socio-anthropologists') item! An amazing and compelling, collective portrait! The
interspersed military imagery (or maybe something else), also introduces a new spin
on the hopes for this already tenuous social-media culture. I've had to
organize/sub-divide these in some fashion, so by state/country seems to be the
prevailing approach. And given how often workers are compelled to move around,
there's more of a local difference in cultural self-perception, body language, and
social-sexual proclivity than you might expect. It really is a perhaps overlooked
(overly-present), socially significant era when a massive proportion of the
population is able to individually exorcise their self-imagery instead of being
routinely dependent on existing systematized systems of portraiture and presentation
-- which is not to say that it's entirely free from stylistic-cultural-corporate
constraints and codification (and why, for now at least, I left the imagery in a
nearly random arrangement), but the individual, probably for the first time ever, is
seen freely negotiating a shifting porous skein of varied reception... well,
something like that...

PROXY Gallery
http://cart.iabrace.com

now showing: Profile Portraits (the california collection)
build your own exhibition + catalogue

/:b



--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Sun, 13 Jun 2010 11:27:29 -0700
        From: Jascha Kessler <urim1 at verizon.net>
        Subject: Re: [Humanist] 24.107 cartoon physics
        In-Reply-To: <20100613073202.4972662E0D at woodward.joyent.us>


re the synthesized music: I have found of late that say 90% of new late
night films, mainly classed as "action" or "mystery" or " thriller" and
including lots of copulation action [filmed in bright, daylight-lit rooms]
are driven along by very fast beating soundtracks, whether cars or orgasms,
all the same.  It is almost impossible to watch any of these productions,
including the jouncing naked bodies, before sleeptime, say 12 am, because of
the drumming and screeching.  A lot lost in all this stuff, by "composers"
who playwith dials, and but the one single drumming pulsation, and not the
sort of orchestral or instrumental variations of sound, volume, pacing to
fit or enhance action.   Everything, real people doing real things on film
is now a space video action hype.
Jascha Kessler

On Sun, Jun 13, 2010 at 12:32 AM, Humanist Discussion Group <
willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk> wrote:

>
> Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 24, No. 107.
> Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
> www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
> Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
>
> Date: Sun, 13 Jun 2010 08:14:49 +0100
> From: Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
> Subject: cartoon physics
>
> For some years I have been now and again pursuing the origins of a
> childhood memory of a cartoon in which a figure runs or walks off a
> cliff, then keeps on walking until the fatal moment when he (invariably
> in memory) notices where he is and falls suddenly straight down. A
> remark in a television series, about being "a Wile E. Coyote", led me to
> the character in question, and so to the very helpful Wikipedia entry on
> Coyote, which refers to "cartoon physics" and to Stephen Gould's
> article, "Looney Tuniverse: Ther is a crazy king of physics at work in
> the world of cartoons", New Scientist 1905, 25 December 1993, p. 56.
> (This Stephen Gould, by the way, is a financial training consultant and
> amateur physicist, not the famous American evolutionary biologist.)
> Apparently the Law of Cartoon Physics illustrated by Wile E. Coyote is
> also exemplified by Daffy Duck, though in a quieter formulation: "Any
> body suspended in space will remain in space until made aware of its
> situation" ("Cartoon Laws of Physics",  funnies.paco.to/cartoon.html).
>
> I did refer to Wile E. Coyote a few days ago on Humanist but give fuller
> reference here to the literature in order to make sure that the deep
> insight which this Law contains will be in active circulation among us.
> It's rhetorically quite effective to point out that someone who goes
> right on thinking and/or saying X when X is clearly, obviously in
> contravention of the facts or of reason, or both, belongs in a cartoon
> world. I won't say that we encounter such people more than others do,
> though I wouldn't be surprised if this turned out to be the case.
>
> But a question. In computer games cartoon physics (and cartoon biology etc)
> often obtain -- to give a very simple example, in a simulation of pinball
> in
> which the coefficient of elasticity of the balls and friction are
> parameters
> rather than constants. Something similar obtains, I would suppose, with
> digitally generated music, in which anything goes, and so constraints have
> to be set by the composer that in musical production using older
> instruments
> are fixed properties of those instruments. Not "virtual reality" in the
> mimetic sense but completely open-ended simulation. Has anyone studied this
> phenomenon (if that's the right word) and its implications? When is it not
> computer art?
>
> Yours,WM
>
> --
> Willard McCarty, Professor of Humanities Computing,
> King's College London, staff.cch.kcl.ac.uk/~wmccarty/;
> Editor, Humanist, www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist;
> Interdisciplinary Science Reviews, www.isr-journal.org.

-- 
Jascha Kessler
Professor of English & Modern Literature, UCLA
Telephone/Facsimile: 310.393.4648
www.jfkessler.com
www.xlibris.com






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