[Humanist] 23.560 why history

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Tue Jan 12 07:32:56 CET 2010


Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 23, No. 560.
Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

[1]   From:    Igor Kramberger <k at aufbix.org>                            (14)
Subject: Re: why history?

[2]   From:    renata lemos <me at renatalemos.org>                          (8)
Subject: why history?

[3]   From:    "Brian A. Bremen" <bremen at uts.cc.utexas.edu>              (56)
Subject: Re: [Humanist] 23.559 why history?

[4]   From:    Todd Lawson <todd.lawson at utoronto.ca>                     (86)
Subject: Re: [Humanist] 23.559 why history?

[5]   From:    "Helena Barbas" <hebarbas at fcsh.unl.pt>                     (7)
Subject: RE: [Humanist] 23.559 why history?

[6]   From:    "Rabkin, Eric" <esrabkin at umich.edu>                       (60)
Subject: RE: [Humanist] 23.559 why history?

[7]   From:    "Bleck, Bradley" <BradB at spokanefalls.edu>                 (11)
Subject: RE: [Humanist] 23.559 why history?

[8]   From:    Sterling Fluharty <phdinhistory at gmail.com>                (50)
Subject: Re: [Humanist] 23.559 why history?

--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
Date: Mon, 11 Jan 2010 10:24:16 +0100
From: Igor Kramberger <k at aufbix.org>
Subject: Re: why history?

Good morning,

I would suggest to read some of the studies published in this book:

Reinhart Koselleck, Futures Past: On the Semantics of Historical Time
(Studies in Contemporary German Social Thought.)

http://www.amazon.com/Futures-Past-Semantics-Historical-Contemporary/dp/0231127715/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1263201655&sr=1-4

Kind regards,

--
Igor
-----
Igor Kramberger, raziskovalec-urednik
http://www.ff.uni-mb.si/index.php?page_id=81&person=89
Koro'ska cesta 63, SI-2000 Maribor
pri Tom'si'c, Ulica Toma Brejca 11 a, SI-1241 Kamnik
Slovenija, Evropa

--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
Date: Mon, 11 Jan 2010 10:48:45 -0200
From: renata lemos <me at renatalemos.org>
Subject: why history?

RT @longnow Seminar: "The Wayfinders: Why Ancient Wisdom Matters in the
Modern World" with Wade Davis - 1/13/10. Tickets available:
http://bit.ly/4xViqb
http://bit.ly/4xViqb
http://twitter.com/longnow
--
renata lemos
http://www.renatalemos.org

--[3]------------------------------------------------------------------------
Date: Mon, 11 Jan 2010 06:54:48 -0600
From: "Brian A. Bremen" <bremen at uts.cc.utexas.edu>
Subject: Re: [Humanist] 23.559 why history?
In-Reply-To: <20100111091413.1403B44BED at woodward.joyent.us>

Napoleon Bonaparte said: "What is history but a fable agreed upon?"

not overly positive, but interesting.
cheers,
brian

Brian A. Bremen
Associate Professor
English Department
1 University Station, B5000
The University of Texas at Austin
Austin, TX   78712-0195

Office:  Parlin 127                       
email:  bremen at uts.cc.utexas.edu
Phone:  512-471-7842                                     
Fax: 512-471-4909

--[4]------------------------------------------------------------------------
Date: Mon, 11 Jan 2010 10:06:39 -0500
From: Todd Lawson <todd.lawson at utoronto.ca>
Subject: Re: [Humanist] 23.559 why history?
In-Reply-To: <20100111091413.1403B44BED at woodward.joyent.us>

Dear Willard,

I copy  herewith two excerpts that speak to the great question. With
the first I obviously carry coals to Newcastle. Please forgive.

Happy New Year!

Todd

I
It would perhaps be difficult to prove completely the axiom that objects do
not cease to exist when we have stopped looking at them. Yet it is hard to
see how we could maintain a consistent sense of reality without assuming it,
and everyone does so assume it in practice and would even assert it as the
first article of common sense. For some reason it is more difficult to
understand that events do not necessarily cease to exist when we have
stopped experiencing them, and those who would assert, as an equally obvious
fact, that all things do not dissolve in time any more than they do in space
are very rare. Frye. FS[1969].247

II
Because it has not had to confront the problems raised by what we
call the 'historical consciousness', philosophical thought in Islam
moves in two counter yet complementary directions: issuing from the
Origin (mabda'), and returning [ma'ad) to the Origin, issue and return
both taking place in a vertical dimension. Forms are thought of as being
in space rather than in time. Our thinkers perceive the world not as
'evolving' in a horizontal and rectilinear direction, but as ascending:
the past is not behind us but 'beneath our feet'. From this axis stem
 the meanings of the divine Revelations [...].

Henry Corbin. History of Islamic Philosophy. Translated by Liadain Sherrard
with the assistance of Philip Sherrard. London, 1993 [originally published
as Histoire de la  philosophie islamique. Paris, 1964 (p.18) &1986 (pp.
25-6) for the French.]

*************************B. Todd Lawson, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Islamic Thought
Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations
University of Toronto
Bancroft Hall
4 Bancroft Avenue
Toronto, Ontario M5S 1C1
Canada
Telephone +4169783080

http://toddlawson.ca

--[5]------------------------------------------------------------------------
Date: Mon, 11 Jan 2010 15:40:09 -0000
From: "Helena Barbas" <hebarbas at fcsh.unl.pt>
Subject: RE: [Humanist] 23.559 why history?
In-Reply-To: <20100111091413.1403B44BED at woodward.joyent.us>

From my literary bias I can recall two books: «What is History?» (1961) - E. Hallett Carr: «The belief in a hard core of historical facts existing objectively and independently of the interpretation of the historian is a preposterous fallacy, but one which it is very hard to eradicate» and «By and large, the historian will get the kind of facts he wants. History means interpretation.» Followed by the «Nouvelle Histoire» group, namely Paul Veyne - «Comment on écrit l'histoire: essai d'épistémologie» (1970) - roughly: «History is a narrative of events, and all the rest results from this fact.» and «History is a narration just like the novel, it selects, simplifies and reorganizes its events.»  The resulting problematic is summarized in Peter Brooke's preface to «New Perspectives on Historical Writing» (1992) - http://www.kowa.euv-frankfurt-o.de/iba_european_history/iba_european_history_text_p_burke_new_history.PDF
In spite of all this, it seems that history writing is till more useful (and serious) than just writing novels.

Best regards
Helena Barbas

--[6]------------------------------------------------------------------------
Date: Mon, 11 Jan 2010 11:17:12 -0500
From: "Rabkin, Eric" <esrabkin at umich.edu>
Subject: RE: [Humanist] 23.559 why history?
In-Reply-To: <20100111091413.1403B44BED at woodward.joyent.us>

Willard, in Borges' "Pierre Menard, Author of the Quixote," a fictional essayist analyzes a line from the fictional eponymous writer that begins "...truth, whose mother is history, rival of time, depository of deeds, witness of the past, exemplar and adviser to the present, and the future's counselor."  The analysis that follows is, to me, paradigmatic of the way this great story problematizes knowledge.

I found a pdf of it online at http://www.vahidnab.com/menard.pdf.

Enjoy!

Eric

----------------------------------------
Eric S. Rabkin
Arthur F. Thurnau Professor
Department of English
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1003
www.umich.edu/~esrabkin

--[7]------------------------------------------------------------------------
Date: Mon, 11 Jan 2010 08:21:24 -0800
From: "Bleck, Bradley" <BradB at spokanefalls.edu>
Subject: RE: [Humanist] 23.559 why history?
In-Reply-To: <20100111091413.1403B44BED at woodward.joyent.us>

Not sure if this qualifies as strongly positive, or even about history, but In Nature, Emerson writes in the introduction that "The foregoing generations beheld God and nature face to face; we, through their eyes. [Hence, the connection to history that I'm seeing. BB] Why should not we also enjoy an original relation to the universe? Why should we not have a poetry and philosophy of insight and not of tradition, and a religion by revelation to us, and not the history of theirs?"

It would seem that we can't have this original relationship without knowledge of the previous relationships, so, a call of sorts to understand the value of studying history.

Bradley Bleck
English Department
Spokane Falls CC
http://bleckblog.org
http://biketoworkspokane.org

--[8]------------------------------------------------------------------------
Date: Mon, 11 Jan 2010 13:14:41 -0500
From: Sterling Fluharty <phdinhistory at gmail.com>
Subject: Re: [Humanist] 23.559 why history?
In-Reply-To: <20100111091413.1403B44BED at woodward.joyent.us>

Willard,

You might find this useful:

http://www.historians.org/pubs/free/WhyStudyHistory.htm

Best wishes,
Sterling Fluharty

On Mon, Jan 11, 2010 at 4:14 AM, Humanist Discussion Group <
willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk> wrote:

>                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 23, No. 559.
>         Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
>                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
>                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org
>
>
>
>        Date: Mon, 11 Jan 2010 09:13:09 +0000
>        From: Willard McCarty <willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk>
>        Subject: why history?
>
> I am looking for strongly positive statements about the value of
> studying and writing history. I'd prefer something far more positive
> than Santayana's “Those who ignore history are compelled unknowingly to
> relive it”, from Reason in Common Sense (1905: 284), to counterbalance
> Stephen Daedalus' “History... is a nightmare from which I am trying to
> awake”, Ulysses I, and Karl Marx's "The tradition of all the dead
> generations weighs like a nightmare on the brain of the living [wie ein
> Alp auf dem Gehirne der Lebenden],” The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis
> Bonaparte (1852).
>
> Any suggestions?
>
> Thanks.
>
> Yours,
> WM
> --
> Willard McCarty, Professor of Humanities Computing,
> King's College London, staff.cch.kcl.ac.uk/~wmccarty/;
> Editor, Humanist, www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist;
> Interdisciplinary Science Reviews, www.isr-journal.org.




More information about the Humanist mailing list