[Humanist] 23.549 events: Dictionary in Print & Cloud; logic

Humanist Discussion Group willard.mccarty at mccarty.org.uk
Fri Jan 8 07:31:18 CET 2010


                 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 23, No. 549.
         Centre for Computing in the Humanities, King's College London
                       www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist
                Submit to: humanist at lists.digitalhumanities.org

  [1]   From:    Geoff Sutcliffe <geoff at cs.miami.edu>                      (30)
        Subject: LPAR-16 deadline extended

  [2]   From:    Michael Hancher <mh at umn.edu>                              (26)
        Subject: cfp: The Dictionary in Print and in the Cloud


--[1]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Fri, 8 Jan 2010 05:22:43 +0000
        From: Geoff Sutcliffe <geoff at cs.miami.edu>
        Subject: LPAR-16 deadline extended


                             CALL FOR PAPERS

                                  LPAR-16
           
                 16th International Conference on Logic for
             Programming, Artificial Intelligence and Reasoning

                           April 25 - May 1, 2010
                               Dakar, Senegal
                        http://www.lpar.net/lpar-16/

                ============================================
                SUBMISSION DEADLINE EXTENDED TO 13th JANUARY
                ============================================

The series of International Conferences on Logic for Programming, Artificial 
Intelligence and Reasoning (LPAR) is a forum where, year after year, some of 
the most renowned researchers in the areas of logic, automated reasoning, 
computational logic, programming languages and their applications come to 
present cutting-edge results, to discuss advances in these fields, and to 
exchange ideas in a scientifically emerging part of the world. The 16th 
edition will be held in Dakar, Senegal.

Logic is a fundamental organizing principle in nearly all areas in Computer 
Science. It runs a multifaceted gamut from the foundational to the applied. 
At one extreme, it underlies computability and complexity theory and the 
formal semantics of programming languages. At the other, it drives billions 
of gates every day in the digital circuits of processors of all kinds. Logic 
is in itself a powerful programming paradigm but it is also the quintessential 
specification language for anything ranging from real-time critical systems 
to networked infrastructures. Logical techniques link implementation and 
specification through formal methods such as automated theorem proving and 
model checking. Logic is also the stuff of knowledge representation and 
artificial intelligence. Because of its ubiquity, logic has acquired a 
central role in Computer Science education.

[...]

--[2]------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Date: Fri, 08 Jan 2010 00:04:27 -0600
        From: Michael Hancher <mh at umn.edu>
        Subject: cfp: The Dictionary in Print and in the Cloud


Call for proposals for possible Special Session at the Modern Language 
Association convention, Los Angeles, January 6-9, 2011.  Benedict 
Anderson's "philological-lexicographic revolution" and after. Cultural 
standardization and fixity in the regime of print-capitalism; 
implications of fluid lexicographical practice and access online.

In _Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of 
Nationalism_ (1983) Benedict Anderson closely identified the 
standardizing effects of lexicography with what he called 
"print-capitalism," itself linked to "the origins of national 
consciousness." Anderson's schematic references to "the lexicographical 
revolution in Europe" invite exemplification and critique. Also, in 
recent decades the lexicographical revolution has moved from print to 
cyberspace and the cloud. What do projects like dictionary.com, 
Wiktionary, le-dictionnaire.com, and DWDS, as well as Google's "define:" 
function, imply about communities constructed by "the dictionary" online 
today? Abstracts of proposed 15- or 20-minute presentations on either 
topic or both are welcome by March 15; please send them to mh at umn.edu. 
In March I'll organize a panel for the MLA program committee to 
consider. The committee reports its decisions in May.

Given sufficient interest I may edit a group of such papers for 
publication; therefore I invite proposals also from people who will not 
attend the MLA convention.

Michael Hancher
Professor of English, University of Minnesota
President, Dictionary Society of North America 
(http://www.dictionarysociety.com )





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